Tom Ainslee has a charming wife and a dear little baby. Still he is a discontented husband, only too ready to see as much as possible of Nina Harrington, the flirtatious wife of ... See full summary »
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Eugenie Forde
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Tom Ainslee has a charming wife and a dear little baby. Still he is a discontented husband, only too ready to see as much as possible of Nina Harrington, the flirtatious wife of kind-hearted, good-natured Jim Harrington, who had but recently arrived in the West and rented a cozy shack near the Ainslees. Of course, the inevitable happens; Martha Ainslee comes into a room unexpectedly and discovers her husband embracing his neighbor's wife. As soon as the woman goes, Martha pleads with her husband, but to no avail, for no sooner is his wife's back turned, than he follows Nina and again tells her of his love. Martha, when she discovers his absence, takes the baby and follows him. This time she pleads with Nina, who merely laughs at her misery and turns gaily away. The next day, as soon as Tom leaves the house to meet Nina, which fact Martha has learned from a note which she had deftly extracted from her husband's pocket, Martha takes her rifle and follows Tom. From the other side, Jim, ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Short | Drama

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26 June 1912 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Its rather trying situation is handled in a clean, wholesome way
10 December 2016 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

A strongly dramatic picture of passion, set in Western backgrounds that are somewhat rough and primitive. It is an effective human and truthful story yet its rather trying situation is handled in a clean, wholesome way. Indeed, the moral wisdom of the story is one of its highest qualities. Four people have prominent roles in it, two couples, with the flirtatious wife of one man and the light-headed husband of the other woman as the victims of their own folly. That all concerned become victims before the end need, hardly be said. It is a tragedy of disillusion; there is no killing in it. The characters are drawn in a vivid, clear-cut way, showing much imagination in both the producer and the players. The scene closing and photography could hardly have been improved upon. It is a desirable picture. - The Moving Picture World, July 6, 1912


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