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Inspector Bellamy (2009) More at IMDbPro »Bellamy (original title)


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12 items from 2011


New Release: Mammuth DVD

7 October 2011 3:22 PM, PDT | Disc Dish | See recent Disc Dish news »

Release Date: Dec. 6, 2011

Price: DVD $29.95

Studio: Olive Films

Gerard Depardieu and Isabelle Adjani hit the road in Mammuth.

France’s great Gérard Depardieu (Inspector Bellamy)—sporting a wild mane of hair—stars in the 2010 comedy-drama movie Mammuth, co-starring the usually-fine and always-beautiful Isabelle Adjani (Ishtar).

The movie turns on a 60-year-old working-class man named Serge (Depardieu), who decides to retire and reap his pensioner’s rewards. Unfortunately, Serge runs into the implacable wall of bureaucracy after finding out that his former employers have neglected to declare his earnings. To receive full benefits, he needs to go back to them and gather the missing affidavits. Encouraged by his wife, Serge climbs onto his old 1970s Mammoth motorcycle and sets off on a trip to recover his lost wages—unaware that he’s also due to encounter some buried memories. As he reconnects with old friends, Serge discovers that their idea of »

- Laurence

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New Release: The Names of Love DVD

20 September 2011 2:47 PM, PDT | Disc Dish | See recent Disc Dish news »

Release Date: Oct. 18, 2011

Price: DVD $29.95

Studio: Music Box

Sara Forestier isn't shelfish about her politics in The Names of Love.

The 2010 French comedy movie The Names of Love tells the tale of a woman who uses sex as a weapon — a political weapon!

Directed by Michel Leclerc (La Tete de Maman), the foreign film follows Baya Benmahmoud (Sara Forestier, Wild Grass), who’s a young, extroverted liberal who goes to bed with her right-wing opponents in order to manipulate them towards her left-wing causes.

A weapon of “mass seduction,” Baya has a remarkably high success rate — until she meets her match in Arthur Martin (Jacques GamblinInspector Bellamy), a Jewish middle age, middle-of-the road scientist. The two are destined to fall in love, of course, but not even fate can predict what will happen when their parents all come together for the first time. Will the issues of Arab-Jewish relationships, »

- Laurence

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Celebs Off a Plane: 10 Famous Problem Flyers

4 September 2011 4:43 PM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Actor Gerard Depardieu and Green Day frontman Billie Joe Armstrong both experienced some turbulence recently when they attempted to take flight. Depardieu, who really, really had to go, urinated on a plane, and Armstrong got bumped because his pants were just too darn saggy for one Southwest Airlines flight attendant. Maybe they shouldn't feel too bad. The twin histories of celebrity and air travel have seen their share of famous folks experiencing flight-related troubles. Read on for a list of high-profile problem flyers. "Inspector Bellamy" star Gerard Depardieu proved to be quite the »

- Tim Kenneally

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Contest: Win French comedy Potiche on DVD

14 July 2011 8:49 AM, PDT | Disc Dish | See recent Disc Dish news »

The contest is now over. Congratulations to the three winners (chosen by Random.org): Prakash Natarajan, Daniel Thornton Jr. and Susan Smoaks! Please email your mailing address to sam@discdish.com to claim your prize.

Thanks to everyone who entered. Keep check back for more giveaways.

Aaah, the wonderful Catherine Deneuve (Park Benches) and brilliant Gerard Depardieu (Inspector Bellamy) in a movie about women’s liberation in the 1970s. How can it go wrong? Potiche arrives on DVD and Blu-ray on July 19 from Music Box Films, and Disc Dish is giving away three copies to lucky readers.

If you’re into foreign films, especially French ones, you’ll be thrilled to know Potiche is directed by the fabulous filmmaker Fancois Ozon (Hideaway). If you aren’t familiar with his work, trust us, it’s worth it to take a look.

Potiche gets its name from the French word for »

- Sam

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New Release: Potiche DVD and Blu-ray

12 July 2011 11:59 AM, PDT | Disc Dish | See recent Disc Dish news »

The French comedy Potiche, a satire about the war between the sexes and classes by the prolific François Ozon (Hideaway), arrives on DVD and Blu-ray in the U.S. on July 19 from Music Box Films.

Starring French film legends Gerard Depardieu (Inspector Bellamy) and Catherine Deneuve (Park Benches), Potiche is a loose adaptation of the popular 1970s French stage play by Pierre Barillet and Jean-Pierre Gredy (Cactus Flower).

Set in a provincial French town in 1977, the movie tells the story of Suzanne Pujot (Deneuve), who’s the housebound trophy wife of the tyrannical industrialist Robert Pjuol (Fabrice Luchini, Moliere). When the workers go on strike and her husband has a heart attack, Suzanne steps into the manager’s chair and proves herself a very capable woman of action. But when she gets romantically involved with her ex-beau, the union leader (Depardieu), things get complicated.

Incidentally, the title, Potiche, is a »

- Sam

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New Release: Claude Chabrol on Blu-ray and DVD

5 July 2011 12:24 PM, PDT | Disc Dish | See recent Disc Dish news »

Criterion will issue two long-unavailable early films by the late, great French New Waver Claude Chabrol (Inspector Bellamy) on Sept. 20.

Le beau Serge (1958), writer/director Chabrol’s first feature, will be released on Blu-ray and DVD for the suggested retail prices of $39.95 and $29.95. Les cousins (1959) on Blu-ray and DVD will carry the same prices.

The drama Le beau Serge, Chabrol’s first film, follows a successful yet sickly young man (Jean‑Claude Brialy) who returns home to the small village where he grew up only to find himself at odds with his former close friend (Gérard Blain)—now unhappily married and a wretched alcoholic—and the provincial life he represents.

In Les cousins, Chabrol crafts a sly moral fable about a provincial boy who comes to live with his sophisticated bohemian cousin in Paris. Through these seeming opposites, Chabrol conjures a darkly comic character study that questions notions of good and evil, »

- Laurence

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The Names Of Love Stills

11 May 2011 8:18 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Music Box Films Presents

Michel Leclerc’s

The Names Of Love

(Le nom des gens)

*** César Awards 2011 – Winner – Best Actress, Best Original Screenplay ***

*** Col-Coa Film Festival 2011 – Official Selection ***

*** Cannes International Film Festival 2010 – Official Selection ***

Opening In Los Angeles And New York On June 24

Baya Benmahmoud (Sara Forestier), a young, extroverted liberal, lives by the old hippie slogan: “Make love, not war” to convert right-wing men to her left-wing political causes by sleeping with them. She seduces many and so far has received exceptional results – until she meets Arthur Martin (Jacques Gamblin), a Jewish middle aged, middle-of-the road scientist. Bound by common tragic family histories (the Algerian War and Holocaust under Vichy), the duo improbably fall in love. Amid the bubbly amour, humorous lasciviousness and moments of sheer madness, filmmaker Michel Leclerc injects satirical riffs on such hot-button sociopolitical issues as Arab-Jewish relations, anti-Semitism, immigration, and racial and cultural identity.

24 year-old »

- Melissa Howland

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Readers Writing, or some brief notes on two films recently revisited

14 February 2011 3:27 PM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Inspector Bellamy and Cold Weather have, frankly, a lot in common: a male detective with an interest in crime fiction (in Bellamy Georges Simenon and Agatha Christie take the places occupied by Arthur Conan Doyle and E.W. Hornung in Cold Weather) is assisted in an investigation by the woman he is closest to (Bellamy, his wife; Cold Weather, his sister); the first clues to the mystery are introduced in a motel room; an emphasis on dinner scenes and establishing the social life of the characters before establishing the crime; the integral role played by a frequent collaborator's score (Chabrol's son, Matthieu, in Bellamy; Keegan DeWitt in Cold Weather); adult siblings (Paul and Jacques, Doug and Gail) cohabitating, one noticeably more aimless than the other; overcast skies, the sea, and landscapes, namely the way landscapes appear from a moving car; the cars themselves, key participants in the action, indicators of character »

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DVD Of The Week: Inspector Bellamy

25 January 2011 3:16 PM, PST | GreenCine Daily | See recent GreenCine Daily news »

by Vadim Rizov

A director's death inevitably casts their last film in a new light. Claude Chabrol's Inspector Bellamy (just Bellamy in its native France) ups that ante in its opening credits, as a Pov camera—but whose?—glides through a seaside cemetery, with unknown whistling behind it. It's a lovely moment now, with Chabrol whistling his way to death, even if its suggestion is entirely unintentional. Chabrol's finale has none of the self-conscious gravitas of Robert Altman's A Prairie Home Companion, a film the director announced was consciously about death. Altman knew he was dying, while Chabrol apparently didn't, but the film resonates regardless.

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"Dogtooth," "Enter the Void" and a Week of DVDs on the Edge

24 January 2011 2:28 PM, PST | ifc.com | See recent IFC news »

"Dogtooth" (2009)

Directed by Giorgos Lanthimos

Released by Kino

"Enter the Void" (2010)

Directed by Gaspar Noé

Released by Mpi Home Video

Somehow it's fitting that two of last year's most dangerous films will be hitting DVD shelves the same week, both being favorites of the IFC.com staff. "Dogtooth," Lanthimos' much-debated Un Certain Regard winner from Cannes, concerns the lives of three culturally isolated children -- two daughters and a son, who range from mid-teens to early 20s -- fenced in by their parents' country home, who receive a reeducation when their lone connection to the outside world, a female security guard for their parents' business, introduces them to the joys of sex and Sylvester Stallone films. Meanwhile, "Irreversible" provocateur Noé's latest is a wildly ambitious 155-minute extravaganza set inside the mind of a drug dealer told from the first-person perspective. Nathaniel Brown and "Boardwalk Empire" star Paz de la Huerta »

- Stephen Saito

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DVD Playhouse--January 2011

21 January 2011 12:40 AM, PST | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

DVD Playhouse: January 2011

By

Allen Gardner

Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps (20th Century Fox) Sequel to the seminal 1980s film catches up with a weathered, but still determined Gordon Gekko (Michael Douglas, who seems to savor every syllable of Allan Loeb and Stephen Schiff’s screenplay) just out of jail and back on the comeback trail. In attempting to repair his relationship with his estranged daughter (Carey Mulligan), Gekko forges a reluctant alliance with her fiancé (Shia Labeouf), himself an ambitious young turk who finds himself seduced by Gekko’s silver tongue and promise of riches. Lifeless film is further evidence of director Oliver Stone’s decline. Once America’s most exciting filmmaker, Stone hasn’t delivered a film with any teeth since 1995’s Nixon. Labeouf and Mulligan generate no sparks on-screen, and the story feels forced from the protracted opening to the final, Disney-esque denouement. Only a brief cameo by Charlie Sheen, »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

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Inspector Bellamy

20 January 2011 7:59 PM, PST | The Scorecard Review | See recent Scorecard Review news »

Inspector Bellamy

Directed by: Claude Chabrol

Cast: Gérard Depardieu, Marie Bunel, Clovis Cornillac

Running Time: 1 hour 50 min

Rating: Unrated

Release Date: January 21, 2011

Plot: Vacationing Police Inspector Paul Bellamy (Dépardieu) becomes involved in the case of a man who faked his own death, while on vacation with his wife and brother.

Who’S It For? Fans of Agatha Christie-style mysteries would enjoy this film.

Expectations: I had no idea what this film was about, only that it was directed by Claude Chabrol.  I don’t think I’ve seen any of his films.

Scorecard (0-10)

Actors:

Gérard Depardieu as Paul Bellamy: Perhaps France’s most famous living actor plays a well-known Parisian police Inspector on holiday. He’s sought out by a man who faked his own death.  Unlike most contemporary police movies, Bellamy takes his time solving the case.  He goes to see the various suspects, then goes home »

- Megan Lehar

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2014 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

12 items from 2011


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