Documentary about Charlie Russell, who believes that grizzly bears are not dangerous and that our unnecessary fear of them is driving them to extinction.
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Cast

Episode credited cast:
Charlie Russell ...
Himself
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Storyline

The film follows Canadian Charlie Russell over a couple of summers he spent in Kamchatka, acquiring a couple of orphaned grizzly bear cubs each year from a local zoo and raising them in a large pen remote region on the peninsula in the Russian Far East, before releasing them into the wild.

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Documentary

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Release Date:

12 December 2006 (UK)  »

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Excellent film
19 February 2011 | by (Portland, Oregon, USA) – See all my reviews

Poaching, killing endangered animals for sport. Human is most vicious predator (kills not because he is hungry but for sport). If you cannot farm it - you cannot hunt it. Bear Man Of Kamchatka sacrificed TEN years to show what poaching and senseless killing of defenseless animals is. To some, the man is "a nut case", but most people who see the film realize what we should do: we should educate people that if we or our children are to enjoy the world and nature, we must preserve the environment and animals AT ANY COST. Other excellent films I watched: Elephant Diaries, Echo of the Elephants, Amazon with Bruce Perry. Some reviews here refer to some fifty-year old documentary movies about bears, but I have not watched those because fifty years ago situation with environment and with animals was very different. Today, with human population growing exponentially and without bounds, there will be no place left for magnificent and amazing animals who can no longer run away from poachers. Today, killing any animal is not "courageous", but it is cowardly: shooting an elephant or a bear is like shooting a poodle because animals are used to live in very close proximity with humans. Today, defending animals from poachers takes real courage and bravery.


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