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Meryl Streep in ‘Julie & Julia’: A look back at her 16th Oscar nomination, the competition and the outcome

Meryl Streep in ‘Julie & Julia’: A look back at her 16th Oscar nomination, the competition and the outcome
This article marks Part 16 of the 21-part Gold Derby series analyzing Meryl Streep at the Oscars. Join us as we look back at Meryl Streep’s nominations, the performances that competed with her at the Academy Awards, the results of each race and the overall rankings of the contenders.

In 1977, the year Meryl Streep made her feature film debut in “Julia,” Nora Ephron was working full-time as a columnist for Esquire, penning memorable pieces on the likes of controversial Boston University President John Silber and the series finale of “The Mary Tyler Moore Show.”

By the time, six years later, Ephron made her own big screen debut as screenwriter of the Streep-headlined “Silkwood” (1983), Streep had two Oscar victories under her belt. The success of “Silkwood” in 1983 set expectations supremely high for their collaboration on “Heartburn” (1986), based on the acclaimed Ephron semi-autobiographical novel – anticipation that would make that picture’s ultimate
See full article at Gold Derby »

2018 BAFTA Awards: ‘Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri’ breaks Best British Film curse

2018 BAFTA Awards: ‘Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri’ breaks Best British Film curse
“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” won the very first BAFTA Award of the evening on Feb. 18 when it was named Best British Film. And it ended the night by claiming the Best Picture prize. That marked just the second time since the British academy reintroduced Best British Film in 1992 that the same movie won both awards. The only other double dipper was “The King’s Speech,” which went to win Best Picture at the Oscars in 2011.

It might seem odd that a film like “Three Billboards,” which is set in the American heartland, qualified for consideration as Best British Film. However, it was written and directed by an Englishman, Martin McDonagh, and co-financed by UK broadcaster Channel 4.

See 2018 BAFTA Awards: ‘Three Billboards’ wins 5 including Best Picture, ‘The Shape of Water’ takes 3 [Updating Live]

Over the last quarter century, seven other British films have been named Best Picture at the BAFTAs: “Howards End
See full article at Gold Derby »

BAFTA Awards: 6 British nominees who beat eventual Oscar winners

BAFTA Awards: 6 British nominees who beat eventual Oscar winners
Since the the BAFTAs moved ahead of the Oscars in 2000, it has become a fairly reliable barometer of who will win in the four acting races at the Academy Awards. However, there have been six occasions when it has gone with home-grown talent over the eventual Oscar winners. And there have been eight other times when British nominees have won without facing the eventual Academy Awards champs.

See 2018 BAFTA Awards: ‘The Shape of Water’ dominates with 12 nominations, ‘Darkest Hour’ and ‘Three Billboards’ at 9

Best Actor

2000: Jamie Bell for “Billy Elliot” over Russell Crowe for “Gladiator”; Bell was snubbed by Oscars.

2002: Daniel Day-Lewis for “Gangs of New York” over Adrien Brody for “The Pianist.”

2009: Colin Firth for A Single Man” over Jeff Bridges for “Crazy Heart.”

In 2013, Chiwetel Ejiofor won the BAFTA for “12 Years a Slave,” 2013; Oscar winner Matthew McConaughey (“Dallas Buyers Club”) was not nominated at BAFTA.
See full article at Gold Derby »

2018 Baftas: Will Best British Film curse strike down ‘Darkest Hour’ or ‘Three Billboards’?

2018 Baftas: Will Best British Film curse strike down ‘Darkest Hour’ or ‘Three Billboards’?
“Darkest Hour” and “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” each reaped nine nominations for the 2018 BAFTA Awards. Among these are bids for Best British Film. While that nomination for the former makes sense given the subject matter and pedigree of Joe Wright‘s biopic about prime minister Winston Churchill, the latter doesn’t appear to be British. However, while the film is set in the American heartland, it was written and directed by an Englishman, Martin McDonagh, and that qualified it for consideration in this category.

Both films also number among the five in contention for Best Picture, alongside the American-made “The Shape of Water” and the international co-productions “Call Me By Your Name” and “Dunkirk.” Fans of either of “Darkest Hour” or “Three Billboards” should be rooting for one of their rivals in the Best British Film race — “The Death of Stalin,” “God’s Own Country,” “Lady Macbeth” or “Paddington 2” — to win on Feb.
See full article at Gold Derby »

BAFTA Awards 2018: Timothee Chalamet would make history as just the 3rd American to win Rising Star Award

BAFTA Awards 2018: Timothee Chalamet would make history as just the 3rd American to win Rising Star Award
Timothee Chalamet is in the midst of a breakthrough year with supporting roles in “Lady Bird” and “Hostiles” and a starring performance in “Call Me by Your Name.” As a result he’s racked up two nominations at the BAFTAs: Best Actor for “Call Me” as well as the Rising Star Award for breakthrough performers. But if Chalamet wins Rising Star he would be only the third American to do so.

Chalamet has an uphill battle for Best Actor; he sits in second place in our predictions with odds of 22/1. Currently in first place is Gary Oldman for “Darkest Hour” with overwhelming odds of 1/10 for his performance as British Prime Minister Winston Churchill. And right behind Chalamet is four-time BAFTA winner Daniel Day-Lewis for “Phantom Thread” with odds of 40/1.

Rising Star will be Chalamet’s best chance to pick up some hardware at the BAFTAs. He’s is in a
See full article at Gold Derby »

How Oscar Nominees Defied Expectations in #MeToo Era

How Oscar Nominees Defied Expectations in #MeToo Era
Old voting patterns fell by the wayside this Oscar season, making for a more diverse nominee class than usual.

Nominees defied expectations in numerous categories, from best picture to cinematography and director. These choices challenge established notions of what nominees look like – and the type of films that make it onto the Academy Awards ballot – at a moment when #TimesUp for diversity and inclusion in Hollywood.

Is this a sign that Hollywood is broadening its approach toward prestige movie making? Has the Academy’s diversity push started to affect voting patterns? It’s too soon to say, but that doesn’t lessen the accomplishment of these nominees. Rather, it is all the more reason to savor them.

This year’s boundary breakers range from “Mudbound” cinematographer Rachel Morrison, the first woman ever nominated in the category, to Christopher Plummer, who replaced Kevin Spacey in “All the Money in the World” at the 11th hour and became a supporting
See full article at Variety - Film News »

2018 BAFTA Awards: Does Sally Hawkins (‘The Shape of Water’) have home-field advantage over Frances McDormand (‘Three Billboards’)?

2018 BAFTA Awards: Does Sally Hawkins (‘The Shape of Water’) have home-field advantage over Frances McDormand (‘Three Billboards’)?
After Sally Hawkins dominated the critics circuit, the tide has turned with the televised awards. The “Shape of Water” star lost the Golden Globe, Critics’ Choice and Screen Actors Guild Awards to Frances McDormand (“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”), but she could exact revenge on her home turf at the BAFTAs.

Though they usually go with the frontrunners, every now and then the BAFTAs hand a win to a British native or British–reared star. Just last year, Dev Patel (“Lion”) won Best Supporting Actor over eventual Oscar winner Mahershala Ali (“Moonlight”). Eight years ago, Colin Firth (“A Single Man”) interrupted Jeff Bridges’ Best Actor sweep for “Crazy Heart.” That same year, Carey Mulligan (“An Education”) won Best Actress, albeit eventual Oscar champ Sandra Bullock (“The Blind Side”) wasn’t eligible, but voters opted for British pride over Meryl Streep (“Julie & Julia”).

See 2018 BAFTA Awards: See the full list
See full article at Gold Derby »

Carey Mulligan Gets "Bazaar"

  • SneakPeek
Sneak Peek new images of actress Carey Mulligan ("The Great Gatsby") in the January 2018 issue of "Harper’s Bazaar" magazine (UK), wearing Saint Laurent, Chanel, Miu Miu, Simone Rocha and whole lot more, photographed by Richard Phibbs:

Mulligan's feature film debut was playing 'Kitty Bennet' in the 2005 film adaptation of "Pride & Prejudice", previously appearing on British TV series including "Bleak House" and "Doctor Who".

Mulligan received widespread recognition for her performance in "An Education" (2009), receiving an 'Academy Award' nomination and winning the 'BAFTA Award' for 'Best Actress in a Leading Role'.

In 2015, Mulligan was nominated for a 'Tony Award' for 'Best Lead Actress in a Play' for her performance in the Broadway revival of David Hare's "Skylight".

She is also noted for roles in "Never Let Me Go" (2010), "Drive" (2011), "Shame" (2011), "The Great Gatsby" (2013), "Inside Llewyn Davis" (2013)...

..."Far from the Madding Crowd" (2015), and "Suffragette" (2015).

Click the images to
See full article at SneakPeek »

Terence Davies’ 'A Quiet Passion' to world premiere at Berlin

  • ScreenDaily
Terence Davies’ 'A Quiet Passion' to world premiere at Berlin
Don Cheadle’s Miles Davies’ biopic to get international premiere.

The Berlin International Film Festival (Feb 11-21) has unveiled the eight-strong line-up for its Berlinale Special strand, which includes recent works by contemporary filmmakers and biopics of renowned personalities.

The programme includes the world premiere of Terence Davies’ drama biopic A Quiet Passion, which stars Sex and the City’s Cynthia Nixon as the celebrated American poet Emily Dickinson, charting her life from her early days as a young schoolgirl to her later years as a reclusive artist. Jennifer Ehle (Fifty Shades Of Grey) and Keith Carradine (Nashville) co-star.

The line-up also includes the international premiere of Miles Ahead, Don Cheadle’s directorial debut in which he also stars as jazz pioneer Miles Davis in late 1970s Manhattan, dealing with sycophants, industry executives, career highs and lows and memories of the love of his life, Frances Taylor.

Pernilla August’s A Serious Game will also world premiere
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Odile Dicks-Mireaux on Enhancing Saoirse's Journey in "Brooklyn" / Reuniting with Rachel Weisz for "Denial"

Odile Dicks-Mireaux. Image via Female FirstThe thing about Brooklyn is that everyone can relate to it. Stories of immigration touch almost everyone, or at least run through their family's DNA. Even the move from one state with a personality quite unlike your original home, can feel like a reinvention.  Nearly a year after seeing Brooklyn for the first time it's strange to think that I worried that people wouldn't connect to it! Who needs sensationalistic drama when a story is this really. When it's power can sneak up on you? 

I had the pleasure of discussing this universal resonance, and the job of defining Eilis (Saoirse Ronan) through her costume changes with the designer Odile Dicks-Mireaux, who herself related to the story. Her mother was French and her father British and they met, both immigrants, in Brooklyn in the 1940s, and built a life in a foreign country together. Odile
See full article at FilmExperience »

The 13 Most Underrated Movies of 2015

The 13 Most Underrated Movies of 2015
Many of the best films of 2015 struggled to find audiences on the big screen. It’s not that Americans have stopped splurging at the movies: ticket sales are projected to hit a record $11 billion this year. However, audiences were more inclined to brave the multiplexes for major tentpole entertainment like “Stars Wars: The Force Awakens,” “Jurassic World” or “Avengers: Age of Ultron” over small dramas or comedies. The golden age of television might be influencing consumer habits, too. Theatergoers want their money’s worth — in the form of special effects, explosions and A-list stars — when they make a commitment to see a movie.

If the trend continues, the industry will need to brace itself for major changes in the years to come. Although Sundance 2015 was a strong year for quality pictures, most of the titles that debuted in Park City floundered at the box office. The prestige fall movie season,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Brooklyn’ Producer Finola Dwyer On Serendipity & Saoirse Ronan – AwardsLine

Finola Dwyer, Oscar-nominated along with her Wildgaze Films partner Amanda Posey for 2009's An Education, reteamed with screenwriter Nick Hornby to bring Colm Tóibín's bestselling novel Brooklyn to the screen. Directed by John Crowley (Is Anybody There?), the film is a touching, human drama about an Irish immigrant in 1950s United States. In the lead, Saoirse Ronan delivers a stirring, heartfelt performance that marks her arrival as a fully mature talent. Here, Dwyer…
See full article at Deadline »

Watch: 'Brooklyn' Writer, Oscar Contender Nick Hornby on Penning a Swooning, Old-Fashioned Romance

Watch: 'Brooklyn' Writer, Oscar Contender Nick Hornby on Penning a Swooning, Old-Fashioned Romance
The pleasures of "Brooklyn" are many, and as well-wrought as the film directed by John Crowley are—he helped to break out Irish star Colin Farrell in "Intermission" and Andrew Garfield in "Boy A"—the succulent juices of the story come from novelist Colm Tóibín and author-turned-Hollywood screenwriting pro Nick Hornby, who wrote the books-that-were-turned-into-movies "About a Boy" and "High Fidelity," and the movie adaptations of Cheryl Strayed's "Wild" and Lynn Barber's "An Education," which earned him an Oscar nomination. Another one is in the offing for "Brooklyn" (Fox Searchlight), which was a long slog labor of love for Hornby, surviving various aborted incarnations. By the time the movie was ready to roll, Irish actress Saoirse Ronan had grown up, and as Hornby says, it's hard to imagine anyone else playing her. She's a young woman with limited hopes in her...
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

‘Brooklyn’ Writer Nick Hornby Says He’s Writing Projects For Spike Jonze, Rosamund Pike & Jason Reitman

‘Brooklyn’ Writer Nick Hornby Says He’s Writing Projects For Spike Jonze, Rosamund Pike & Jason Reitman
The transformation of Nick Hornby from one of the major literary pioneers with a sort of sensitive Generation X masculinity (as with “Fever Pitch,” “High Fidelity” and “About A Boy”), to an Oscar-nominated screenwriter with particularly well-drawn female leads, is a fascinating one. Hornby made his screenwriting transition and picked up an Oscar nod, with “An Education” a few years back, and followed it up with last year’s “Wild,” before this year’s much-acclaimed “Brooklyn,” which seems all-but-certain to throw him into awards chat again. Read More: Sundance Review: Nick Hornby-Scripted 'Brooklyn' He’s got the Helena Bonham Carter-starring BBC miniseries “Love, Nina” coming soon, but tells Jeff Goldsmith’s Q&A podcast that he’s got some terrific new projects coming up as well. First up is a twenty-minute drama for music video and Vr pioneering director Chris Milk, which he says was “cooked
See full article at The Playlist »

Watch: Saoirse Ronan, Emory Cohen and Domnhall Gleeson talk Brooklyn in two new featurettes

  • Cineplex
The festival favourite and likely Oscar contender Brooklyn tells the story of a young woman who is torn between two countries and two men.

Saoirse Ronan stars as Ellis Lacey, who leaves her home in Ireland to pursue better opportunities in the United States. While she's there, she meets and falls in love with Tony (Emory Cohen), a young Italian man. When tragedy forces Ellis to return to Ireland, she realizes that life at home would be easier and just as fulfilling. The choice is made even more difficult when she meets another love interest, Jim (Domnhall Gleeson). 

In these two new featurettes, the cast and crew of Brooklyn discuss the coming-of-age story. Ellis is at a transitional stage in her life, and she's beginning to make choices that will determine the course of her fate.Brooklyn looks to be a heart-breaking tale of the decisions we all have to
See full article at Cineplex »

Win Passes To The Advance Screening Of Brooklyn In St. Louis

“Home is home.”

Brooklyn tells the profoundly moving story of Eilis Lacey (Saoirse Ronan), a young Irish immigrant navigating her way through 1950s Brooklyn. Lured by the promise of America, Eilis departs Ireland and the comfort of her mother’s home for the shores of New York City. The initial shackles of homesickness quickly diminish as a fresh romance sweeps Eilis into the intoxicating charm of love. But soon, her new vivacity is disrupted by her past, and Eilis must choose between two countries and the lives that exist within.

Colm Tóibín’s 2009 novel Brooklyn, one of the most acclaimed novels of the last decade, is adapted by screenwriter Nick Hornby (Wild, An Education) and director John Crowley (Boy A).

Starring Saoirse Ronan, Domhnall Gleeson, Emory Cohen with Jim Broadbent and Julie Walters, Brooklyn opens in St. Louis on November 20, 2015.

Wamg invites you to enter for a chance to win
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Nick Hornby on 'Brooklyn,' Taylor Swift and 'High Fidelity' Sequel

Nick Hornby on 'Brooklyn,' Taylor Swift and 'High Fidelity' Sequel
Nick Hornby is not a casual person. One of the most popular writers to emerge from the U.K. in the Nineties, the author exploded onto the literary scene with tales of overgrown boys whose passions metastasize into lifestyles and prevent them from being functional adults. (You get the sense that Judd Apatow has read ever word Hornby has ever written and taken copious notes.) Fever Pitch (1992) is a winsome, wince-inducing memoir about how the author's obsessive fandom for the Arsenal football club; his first novel, High Fidelity (1995) follows a
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Brooklyn Review [Philadelphia Film Festival 2015]

Period-set love stories typically suffer from stiffness. The genuine emotions evoked by romance and heartache become muted under era-appropriate dialog and layers upon layers of Victorian-era clothing. Sometimes the stories themselves are so distant from the contemporary idea of courtship that a mishandled romantic subplot can feel completely unnatural, bearing no semblance to modern love. All the production design can choke the life out of a movie.

Thankfully, resonance is never an issue for Brooklyn, a new tender, ethereal film that blends a 20th century love triangle with the story of a young Irish immigrant coming to live in the United States.

Eilis Lacey (Saoirse Ronan) immigrates to New York in the 1950s, leaving behind her family and trading in one shop girl job for another. Exiting the doorway at Ellis Island, she’s enveloped in a dreamlike, glowing white light. America is a hopeful place for Eilis, but it’s also overwhelming.
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Oscars: 11 Under-the-Radar Performances that Deserve Buzz

Oscars: 11 Under-the-Radar Performances that Deserve Buzz
This year, the Oscars are almost as confusing as the 2016 presidential race. While many candidates have thrown their hats in the ring—from “Brooklyn” to “Carol,” “Room” and “The Martian”—there’s yet a frontrunner in the best picture race. And the acting categories are even harder to handicap. Will Johnny Depp manage to keep the momentum going, despite mixed reviews for “Black Mass”? Or will the soft box office for “Steve Jobs” hurt Michael Fassbender’s chances? Every year, the Academy throws some curveballs into the mix. Here are 11 performances that haven’t been buzzed about enough, but deserve Oscars consideration.

Robert De Niro

Best Supporting Actor, “The Intern

De Niro could lock up a nomination for his supporting role in “Joy,” David O. Russell’s upcoming drama that hasn’t screened yet. But his strongest performance in years—even better than the last time he was invited to the Oscars,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

How Sarah Gavron Picked Her 'Suffragette'

How Sarah Gavron Picked Her 'Suffragette'
"Suffragette" is a hard-hitting feminist history of England's turbulent turn-of-the-century fight by an oppressed group —women—for the right to vote. And rather than look at the well-heeled aristocrats—one, Emmeline Pankhurst, is memorably played by Meryl Streep—writer Abi Morgan ("The Iron Lady") and her director/collaborator Sarah Gavron ("Brick Road") searched for the right way into the struggle. They found it in the character of Maud, a laundress who has endured horrific working conditions since she was a child, as her mother did before her. Carey Mulligan ("An Education") enthusiastically signed to play her, and could earn her second Oscar nomination. Mulligan carries this movie as ably as she did "Far from the Madding Crowd." Maud is a 24-year-old workhorse who is drawn into the suffragette movement by a co-worker (the excellent Anne-Marie Duff) and local pharmacist (Helena Bonham Carter). The harshness...
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »
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