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The Bang Bang Club (2010)

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A drama based on the true-life experiences of four combat photographers capturing the final days of apartheid in South Africa.

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(book), (book) | 1 more credit »
8 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Neels Van Jaarsveld ...
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Ken Oosterbroek
Nina Milner ...
Samantha
Jessica Haines ...
Allie
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Vivian (as Lika van den Bergh)
Kgosi Mongake ...
Patrick
Patrick Shai ...
Pegleg
Alfred Kumalo ...
Alf Khumalo (as Alf Khumalo)
Craig Palm ...
Amir
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Colin
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Jim (James Nachtwey)
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Storyline

A drama based on the true-life experiences of four combat photographers capturing the final days of apartheid in South Africa.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Sometimes you get too close See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for strong brutal violence, disturbing images, pervasive language, some drug use and sexual content | See all certifications »

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Details

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Language:

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Release Date:

22 July 2011 (South Africa)  »

Also Known As:

Fotógrafos de la muerte  »

Filming Locations:

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Did You Know?

Trivia

Kevin Carter's daughter Megan Carter is featured in the bar scene where she turns around and says 'you must be Ken Oosterbroek'. Standing next to her there is Kevin Carter's step daughter Sian Lloyd. See more »

Goofs

When Greg Marinovich and Joao Silva are reviewing Kevin Carter's film of the vulture and child, the negatives they view through the magnifier are actually halftone images, not normal negatives that one would be examining before publication. (Halftones are the "dotted" images used to print photographs in newspapers and magazines, etc.) See more »

Quotes

Kevin Carter: They're right. All those people who say it's our job to just sit and watch people die. They're right.
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Crazy Credits

Photos taken by the real photographers, including portraits of each other, are used as a backdrop during the first section of the credits. The taking of some of these photographs is portrayed in the film itself. See more »

Connections

References Casablanca (1942) See more »

Soundtracks

Slow Thighs
Written by Brendan Jury
Performed by Urban Creep
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User Reviews

 
A beautifully shot film for the amateur photographer or historian
7 September 2011 | by (London, England) – See all my reviews

This film was a nice surprise; I'd not heard of it before I saw it. The set up is a group of intrepid South African photographers who want to go out and document the troubles surrounding the end of apartheid - a story of incomparable significance at that time. These fours guys each have their own unique personality and reactions to the events but share a desire to get the facts on film (and not just report on the contrived political goings on). They risk life and limb in riots and battles that were fought, very graphically here, within the townships - traditionally no go areas for white people.

The fact that the director (Steven Silver) managed to fit into the running time enough detail on each photographer for sufficient back story, plus was able to project the historical concept but tread lightly enough to not offend those that were caught up in it, was impressive. You could imagine, with a sufficient budget, the book morphing into a mini-series. The performances of the actors (in particular the one playing the black South African who'd recently lost his family) were believable, engaging and consistent.

There is included a romantic story - one which is based on real facts and thus one which must be included in any film which has hopes of scoring successfully at the box office. The story was true and therefor wasn't unnecessary, and added to the sympathy for some South Africans who were obviously against the mistreatment of their countrymen.

The overall feel of the film was one which was not overly 'Hollywood', yet still will be accessible to those who prefer western-style production. As a film about photography the images - still and moving - were beautiful and emotionally very captivating.

Anyone who has an interest in photography and/or social history should not miss this.


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