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  • "Spud" Bowman spent his summers on the shore of a certain lake, in a tent. His principal reason for doing so was because Gladys Merrill's family had a cottage just across the lake. Gladys had numerous admirers, but of all these the most assiduous were "Spud" and a certain Herbert Austin. At the time of the Country Club dance Gladys' attitude left "Spud" and Herbert in some doubt as to whom she intended going with. Herbert determined to clinch matters at the start. On the afternoon of the dance be borrowed "Spud's" boat, without drawing "Spud's" attention to his neighborly action. When "Spud" finished dressing he discovered that he was late and rushed down to the shore without a cent in his pockets. The fact that the boat was missing served only as a momentary check to his impetuous disposition. With characteristic impulsiveness, he plunged into the lake and started to swim to the other shore. When nearly across, he hit his head against a floating log and would have dropped if a girl on a nearby house-boat hadn't fished him out. The girl's name was Mary Franklin. When she helped "Spud" out of the water she was in an extremely agitated condition. Her grandfather had a severe heart attack and was lying unconscious in the cabin inside. "Spud," ignoring his aching head, hastened in, examined the old man and realizing that there was urgent need of a stimulant immediately, plunged into the water and swam to shore. Invading a nearby road house, he demanded a bottle of whiskey. Just after the proprietor handed him the bottle "Spud" remembered that he had no money and left hastily with a few words about future settlement. The proprietor followed him, also a policeman. "Spud" eluded his pursuers in the woods and swam back to the houseboat with the bottle. After reviving old Mr. Franklin, "Spud" continued on his way to the dance, with a very warm feeling in his heart for the girl who had thanked him so warmly for his assistance. At the Country Club, he discovered that Gladys apparently had not missed him. "Spud" went home very thoughtfully. The next day, he took the house-boat girl and her grandfather to dinner at the roadhouse. The scene between "Spud," the proprietor and the policeman furnishes a highly amusing ending to this satisfactory offering.


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