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Puttin' It Over on Papa (1913)

Papa Sinclair, a prosperous farmer and very headstrong, refuses to accept Jack Wilcox, an artist, as his son-in-law, so Bessie Sinclair and Jack elope. After the wedding father is still ... See full summary »

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Papa Sinclair
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Bessie Sinclair
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Mama Sinclair
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Papa Sinclair, a prosperous farmer and very headstrong, refuses to accept Jack Wilcox, an artist, as his son-in-law, so Bessie Sinclair and Jack elope. After the wedding father is still obdurate, but Jack has a plan. Disguised as a farmhand, he secures a position on Papa's farm. The next day Bessie comes home with the story that Jack has deserted her. Papa says "I told you so." Several times in the course of the day he nearly catches his daughter in the arms of the new farmhand. At a barn dance in the evening. Papa introduces Jack to Bessie with the remark "If you had married a man like that I would have been glad." The young folks laugh. Jack removes his disguise and although be rants around for a while he admits the joke is on him and gives the couple his blessing. Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Short | Comedy

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10 May 1913 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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There were some very sleepy places
4 September 2017 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

There were several hearty laughs in this rural farce-burlesque; but, between them, there were some very sleepy places in which were heard rattling of newspapers. Paul Panzer plays Papa, a farmer who forbids his daughter (Pearl Sindelar), to marry a "dude." We don't remember seeing any elopement like this one in any picture before and found if amusing. Rose Gore, as the Mother, adds something to the fun. The offering would have been a hundred per cent, better in half the length.

  • The Moving Picture World, May 24, 1913


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