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Freakonomics (2010)

PG-13 | | Documentary | 3 September 2010 (USA)
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A collection of documentaries that explores the hidden side of human nature through the use of the science of economics.
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Cast

Credited cast:
...
Herself (archive footage)
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Himself - Narrator
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Himself
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Himself - Narrator (segment "It's Not Always A Wonderful Life")
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Johnny the Mechanic
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Student
Ngozi Jane Anyanwu ...
Uneek
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Blake
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Himself
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High School Girl (as Lian Toni Amado)
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Courtroom Audience
Barry Eisler ...
Himself
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Robert Lane
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Deshawn
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Storyline

The field of economics can study more than the workings of economies or businesses, it can also help explore human behavior in how it reacts to incentives. Economist Steven D. Levitt and journalist Stephen J. Dubner host an anthology of documentaries that examines how people react to opportunities to gain, wittingly or otherwise. The subjects include the possible role a person's name has for their success in life, why there is so much cheating in an honor bound sport like sumo wrestling, what helped reduce crime in the USA in the 1990s onward and we follow an school experiment to see if cash prizes can encourage struggling students to improve academically. Written by Kenneth Chisholm (kchishol@rogers.com)

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Six Rogue Filmmakers Explore The Hidden Side Of Everything

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Documentary

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for elements of violence, sexuality/nudity, drugs, and brief strong language | See all certifications »

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Release Date:

3 September 2010 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Freakonomia  »

Box Office

Budget:

$3,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$31,893 (USA) (4 October 2010)

Gross:

$100,675 (USA) (28 November 2010)
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Did You Know?

Quotes

Steven Levitt - Author: The closest thing to a worldview, I would say, in "Freakonomics," is that incentives matter. Not just financial incentives, but social incentives and moral incentives.
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Features It's a Wonderful Life (1946) See more »

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This Too Shall Pass
Written by Damian Kulash (as Damian Joseph Kulash Jr.) and Timothy Nordwind (as Tim Nordwind)
Performed by OK Go
Published by OK Go Publishing (BMI)
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User Reviews

 
Lukewarm at best
14 January 2011 | by (Timisoara, Romania) – See all my reviews

I'll admit from the off that I was skeptical regarding this documentary ever since I first heard it was in production. Having read the book, I felt that what made it enjoyable could not really be transposed onto film. Economics, being such a science of numbers, even in its freakonomic form, does not really lend itself to being narrated to death.

Going beyond this limitation, I reckon the film could have still been better, had it found a unity of tone. Unfortunately, as several different teams were involved with making each of the four chapters, the final experience is heavily fragmented and unlike the book, which kept its pacing throughout, the film is all over the place.

The first part basically looks at whether there is some sort of correlation between a person's first name and the path one goes through life. A potentially amusing segment, it proves to be in search of a comic sense it never arrives at and the examples taken from the book appear wholly unrealistic and not fully integrated.

The second part is quite dark and brings forth a sort of investigation into the Sumo world and allegations of match-rigging. Contextualized in the sacrosanct culture that defines the sport, this exploration of truth, justice and fair-play toys around with big words and complex issues, its reach ultimately exceeding its grasp.

The third part references dear old Romania and our beloved dictator's policy of ruling abortions illegal - a subject matter dealt with artistically in the well-known "4 Months, 3 Weeks, 2 Days". I'm not quite sure the parallel proves a point, because it tries to show how the opposite policy, legalizing abortion in the US following Roe v Wade, caused a sudden, steep reduction in crime in the early nineties. Ironically enough, the generation Ceausescu (the dictator referenced above) forcibly gave birth to, so to say, caused his downfall. Yet, I think this segment points out an interesting observation, even if one could get distracted by the overly dramatic narration.

The last part is an on-film experiment about trying to find an incentive to make kids get better grades in high-school by offering financial rewards. Unfortunately, the set-up lacks any authentic feel and implicitly does not help support the case that the authors tried to convey.

So overall it would seem that almost all segments have at least one fundamental issue that they don't tackle very well. At times the film livens due to the interesting nature of the facts being presented, but on the whole it's still shy of a successful venture. Even while reading the book I felt that the novelty seeped out of it before I had reached its end and this feeling was only exacerbated in the documentary.

I don't think this is the place to debate the correctness of the research Levitt and Dubner have done or their conclusions, because the film certainly does not offer a strong basis to work on. The book has a scientific feel to it, conferring at least a sense of objectivity and, more importantly, finding the levity to show that it does not assume to offer absolute answers. The documentary, on the other hand, loses sight of this and never manages to find its proper balance.


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