Das weiße Band - Eine deutsche Kindergeschichte
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The White Ribbon (2009) More at IMDbPro »Das weiße Band - Eine deutsche Kindergeschichte (original title)


2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

1-20 of 23 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


Cannes: Complete list of winners includes 'Dheepan,' 'Carol,' 'The Lobster,' ...

24 May 2015 3:51 PM, PDT | Gold Derby | See recent Gold Derby news »

Winners were announced on Sunday for the 68th annual Cannes Film Festival, and the top prize, the coveted Palme d'Or, went to Jacques Audiard's French film "Dheepan." This is the first time Audiard has won the award following three unsuccessful attempts ("A Self-Made Hero" in 1996, "A Prophet" in 2009 and "Rust and Bone" in 2012), though he did previously win a screenwriting award for "Self-Made Hero" and the Grand Prix for "A Prophet." -Break- His last two entries lost to films by Michael Haneke –  "The White Ribbon" in 2009 and "Amour" in 2012 – so in his speech, Audiard thanked Haneke "for not making a film this year." Oscars next for Cannes winners Rooney Mara, Emmanuelle Bercot and Vincent Lindon? This year, Oscar-winning directors Joel and Ethan Coen presided over the jury, which also included international actors Rossy de »

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Cannes chief talks approach to female filmmakers

21 May 2015 12:04 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

At his highly-anticipated talk for the Kering Women In Motion series at the Majestic Hotel, Cannes festival director Thierry Fremaux kicked off proceedings with the statement, “This debate makes me furious.”

He then spent much of his talk bopping back and forth between his view that Cannes gets unfairly criticised for the lack of female filmmakers in the programme, while festivals such as Berlin and Venice avoided such reproach, while also claiming to welcome the discussion that has been sparked around the issue of female inequality.

“Yes, there are discriminations, but these issues are widespread across other cultural industries around the world,” said a disgruntled Fremaux.

“People attack us with extreme aggression, but if there is one place where female directors are welcome, it’s here in Cannes.”

Supporting women

Fremaux cited several factors to support his argument that Cannes supports women, including the fact that juries are, in large part, evenly split between »

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Universal Sets Oscar Friendly Release Date for Jolie and Pitt's 'By the Sea'

8 May 2015 9:14 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Universal has announced they'll release Angelina Jolie's next movie, By the Sea, to theaters on Nov. 13, pitting it opposite Warner Bros' Chilean miners story The 33, Paramount's Rings and the Bill Murray-led Rock the Kasbah. The announcement also comes with some additional story details and creative information. Jolie directs and wrote the low budget feature, which is said to be inspired by European cinema and theater of the 1960s and '70s. "This is a story about a relationship derailed by loss, the tenacity of love and the path to recovery and acceptance," Jolie said in a statement. "It has been a privilege to explore these universal human experiences with such a generous and talented cast and crew." Jolie stars alongside husband Brad Pitt in the intimate, character-driven drama centering on an American writer Roland (Pitt) and his wife Vanessa (Jolie), who arrive in a tranquil and picturesque seaside resort in 1970s France, »

- Brad Brevet

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Cannes: Match Factory adds painter biopic 'Paula'

8 May 2015 5:52 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Exclusive: Paula Modersohn-Becker biopic to star Carla Juri.

The Match Factory has bolstered its Cannes slate with director Christian Schwochow‘s (Novemberkind, The Tower) drama Paula, about German expressionist painter Paula Modersohn-Becker.

Despite dying aged 31, Modersohn-Becker is considered one of the pioneers of German Expressionism.

Stefan Kolditz and Stephan Suschke’s script weaves together episodes from the final years of the acclaimed painter’s life, including her breaks with social convention and artistic radicalism.

Wetlands actress Carla Juri is set to star in the title role with Roxane Duran (The White Ribbon) on board to play sculptor Clara Rilke-Westhoff, the wife of poet Rainer Maria Rilke.

The German-French production is produced by Pandora Film Produktion, Grown Up Films and Alcatraz Films in co-production with Westdeutscher Rundfunk, Degeto Film, Radio Bremen.

Producers are Ingelore König, Christoph Friedel, Claudia Steffen. Pandora will also distribute in Germany in 2016.

Shoot is due to get underway in mid-September 2015 in Germany and France »

- andreas.wiseman@screendaily.com (Andreas Wiseman)

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Thompson, Gleeson, Bruhl begin 'Alone In Berlin' shoot

26 March 2015 5:08 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Second World War drama will shoot on location in Berlin, Cologne and Görlitz.

The English-language adaptation of Hans Fallada’s classic 1947 novel Alone In Berlin is set to begin shooting in Germany.

Based on the true story of a working class couple who conducted a series of anonymous protests against the Nazi regime during the Second World War, principal photography will begin tomorrow (March 27) on location in Berlin, Cologne and Görlitz.

Emma Thompson (Saving Mr. Banks) and Brendan Gleeson (Calvary) star as Anna and Otto Quangel, with Daniel Brühl (Rush) playing Gestapo inspector Escherich.

Producers are Stefan Arndt and Uwe Schott for X-Filme, the German production outfit whose credits include Amour, The White Ribbon and Cloud Atlas.

Co-producers are Master Movie’s Marco Pacchioni together with James Schamus and FilmWave’s Christian Grass and Paul Trijbits.

French actor Vincent Perez will direct.

The screenplay was written by Achim von Borries (Good Bye Lenin!) and Vincent »

- michael.rosser@screendaily.com (Michael Rosser)

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Is ‘Wild Tales’ what Argentine cinema should aspire to?

20 February 2015 6:15 AM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Wild Tales 

Written by Damián Szifron

Directed by Damián Szifron

Argentina, 2014

Wild Tales fulfills an Argentine need for release and catharsis. It’s engineered to reflect the zeitgeist or, at least, its own interpretation of the national mood. It stages a multidirectional offensive against marriage, city and national governments, illogical bureaucracy, class and ethnic resentment, and even parenthood. Damián Szifrón, its director and writer, locates six unconnected narratives in clearly Argentine contexts, but mostly avoids specifics: they happen in the present day, are symptomatic of ongoing social and political tensions, but also occur during an unspecified time, as likely today as yesterday and tomorrow, and no people, groups, or parties are explicitly singled out for criticism. No one and everyone is to blame for our spiteful and violent collective moment.

This is no subtle analysis of reasons and origins, only a spectacular, sensational snapshot, or rather an hilarious, infinitely-watchable, and ultimately adolescent cry. »

- Guido Pellegrini

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Critics Look Back on Berlin, Where Kink and Quality Collide

16 February 2015 1:36 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Scott Foundas: Well, Peter, another Berlin Film Festival has come to a close, ending on a high note with the awarding of its top prize, the Golden Bear, to Jafar Panahi’s “Taxi.” Panahi’s film screened right at the start of the festival and emerged as an early consensus favorite among critics here. As it turns out, the Darren Aronofsky-led jury felt the same way, and I’d like to think their decision was based solely on the movie’s artistic merits, rather than the unfortunate position in which its director finds himself in his native Iran, where he’s been under house arrest for the last four years. It’s impossible, of course, to watch “Taxi” without thinking about the unusual circumstances under which it was made — something this highly self-reflexive film very much invites you to do. But what makes “Taxi” a great movie, I think, »

- Peter Debruge and Scott Foundas

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‘13 Minutes’ Helmer Says Hitler’s Would-Be Killer Was Like Snowden – Berlin

12 February 2015 11:44 AM, PST | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

Sony Pictures Classics acquired North and Latin American distribution rights to Oliver Hirschbiegel’s Nazi-era drama 13 Minutes early on at the Berlin Film Festival. The story of Georg Elser, who tried to assassinate Adolf Hitler in 1939, has its official screening out of competition today and was met with high praise from the press corps this morning. This is a return to familiar territory for the Oscar-nominated Downfall director after 2013’s savaged English-language biopic Diana.

A compelling portrait of the resistance fighter, 13 Minutes is not the first time Elser’s story has come to the screen, but is a rarity. Klaus Maria Brandauer starred in and directed Seven Minutes in 1989 which focused more on the building of Elser’s poorly-timed bomb. The failed deed was put in motion during a speech given by Hitler for the anniversary of the 1923 Beer Hall Putsch. The bomb Elser had placed behind the lectern detonated »

- Nancy Tartaglione

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Berlin Film Review: ’13 Minutes’

12 February 2015 10:32 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Before making yet another film about the Third Reich, it would be wise for filmmakers to ask why. Is it to “never forget,” or is it because there always seems to be funding available for a Nazi pic? Oliver Hirschbiegel’s cinematic return to the era, “13 Minutes,” resurrects the story of Georg Elser, Hitler’s would-be assassin in 1939, yet as with countless films set in the period, the absence of subtlety combined with predictable dollops of sentimentalism once again trivialize events in the name of making them understandable. Unsurprisingly, international sales have been brisk, and Sony Classics’ early Berlinale pickup indicates confidence in the possibilities for a full-scale U.S. rollout.

Why is it taking so long for people to question whether a constant stream of trite movies on major subjects is really the best way to commemorate a tragedy? The answer, unfortunately, is that simplistic movies make the unfathomable comprehensible, »

- Jay Weissberg

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Berlin: Sony Classics Grabs Hitler Assassination Drama '13 Minutes'

9 February 2015 8:40 AM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Sony Pictures Classics has grabbed North American and Latin American rights to "13 Minutes" from Beta Cinema and director Oliver Hirschbiegel. Starring Christian Fridel and Burghart Klaußner of "The White Ribbon," and co-starring Katharina Schüttler and Johann von Bülow, the film follows a carpenter "who could have changed world history and saved millions of human lives. If only he had had 13 more minutes. With 13 more minutes, the bomb he had personally assembled would have torn apart Adolf Hitler and his henchmen. But this was not to be, and on 8 November 1939, Hitler left the scene of the attempted assassination earlier than expected - leaving Elser to fail catastrophically," per the press release. Hirschbiegel is best known for his Academy Award-nominated "Downfall," the 2004 German-language, WWII-era drama about the last days of Hitler. "13 Minutes" is produced by Lucky Bird Pictures in »

- Ryan Lattanzio

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Sony Pictures Classics Takes Oliver Hirschbiegel’s ’13 Minutes’

7 February 2015 10:24 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Berlin – In the biggest buy to date on a high-profile film at the Berlin Festival, Sony Pictures Classics has acquired North American and Latin American rights to “13 Minutes,’” directed by Oliver Hirschbiegel (“The Downfall”), and a chronicle of the attempted assassination of Hitler.

Sold by Beta Cinema, “13 Minutes” plays out of competition at this year’s Berlinale.

“13 Minutes” stars Christian Friedel (“The White Ribbon”), Katharina Schuettler (“Generation War”) and Burghart Klaussner (“The White Ribbon”). The film centers on Georg Elser’s failed bomb attack on Hitler on Nov. 8, 1939, in the Munich Buergerbraukeller, where the Nazi dictator left the scene only 13 minutes before the explosion. The story follows Elser from his early years in the Swabian Alps to his last days at the Dachau concentration camp, where he was killed shortly before the end of the war.

Georg Elser, the film argues, was a man who could have changed world history »

- John Hopewell

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Does cinematography bid boost the Oscar chances for 'Ida' as Best Foreign Language Film?

5 February 2015 7:00 PM, PST | Gold Derby | See recent Gold Derby news »

The Polish film "Ida" is now the 49th film to be nominated in the Best Foreign Language Film race and also gain another Oscar nomination. The film's other nod is in Best Cinematography for Lukasz Zal and Ryszard Lenczewski. But does that extra attention from another branch actually boost its chances to win in the foreign category against "Leviathan," "Tangerines," "Timbuktu," and "Wild Tales"? -Break- Updated: Experts' Oscars predictions in 24 categories Only two films have been in the same situation "Ida" is in since the Foreign Language category was permanently created in 1956. "Farewell My Concubine" (1993) from Hong Kong and "The White Ribbon" (2009) from Germany gained additional bids in cinematography. Both films lost in both categories. Four other films have been nominated in other categories in addition to Foreign Film and Cinematography: &quot »

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Amour Fou review – doomed passion in Romantic-era Berlin

5 February 2015 1:46 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The weirdly compelling story of 19th-century author Heinrich von Kleist’s dark desire for a married woman has an undertone of absurdity

Jessica Hausner’s Amour Fou is a strange tragicomic chamber piece based on the life of the 19th-century author Heinrich von Kleist. The film is as carefully composed and disquieting as earlier Hausner films such as Lourdes (2009) and Hotel (2004) but more inert, more deathly: an effect entirely deliberate.

It is set in the Berlin of the Romantic era, where von Kleist has had a sensational success with his 1808 novel The Marquise of O. Christian Friedel – who played the kindly schoolteacher in Haneke’s The White Ribbon – is Heinrich himself, overwhelmed at despair at the human condition and longing for death. Conceiving a doomed passion for a young married woman Henriette Vogel (Birte Schnoeink), he tries to persuade her to join him in a suicide pact, having failed to »

- Peter Bradshaw

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Cinematography Nominations for Foreign-Language Nominees

4 February 2015 8:07 AM, PST | Scott Feinberg | See recent Scott Feinberg news »

By Anjelica Oswald

Managing Editor 

Of the five foreign-language films nominated this year, Poland’s Ida is the only film to receive an Oscar nomination in another category. The black-and-white film is nominated for best cinematography.

Eighteen foreign-language films have received nominations for their cinematography and four have won. Only six of the 18 films were also nominated for best foreign-language film; however, three of the six won for their cinematography.

The first foreign-language film to earn both a best foreign-language film nomination and a cinematography nomination was Sweden’s Fanny & Alexander in 1984. The film won both awards, as well as best art direction and costume design. Writer-director Ingmar Bergman was also nominated for best director and original screenplay.

Ten years later, Hong Kong’s Farewell My Concubine received both nominations as well. It lost the foreign-language race to Spain’s Belle Epoque and lost the cinematography award to Steven Spielberg’s Schindler’s List, »

- Anjelica Oswald

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Film Review: 'Amour Fou'

3 February 2015 1:24 AM, PST | CineVue | See recent CineVue news »

★★★★☆ Jessica Hausner's Amour Fou (2014) has enjoyed considerable praise since it premiered in the Un Certain Regard section back at the Cannes Film Festival last May and is a quietly effective denunciation of the idea of dying for love. It's a reserved period piece, but as with her brilliant Lourdes (2009) it's Hausner's restraint that ends up imbuing her argument with power. We meet German romantic writer Heinrich von Kleist (Christian Friedel, who audiences may recognise from fellow Austrian filmmaker Michael Haneke's Palme d'Or-winning The White Ribbon) as a young, melancholy poet more than a little in love with the notion of death.

»

- CineVue UK

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Amour Fou developing films with Nobel prize-winner

26 January 2015 11:00 PM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Production outfit Amour Fou is in development on two projects - including a “feminist vampire” film - with Nobel prize winning Austrian writer Elfriede Jelinek.

The Vienna and Luxembourg-based firm, co-founded by Alexander Dumreicher-Ivanceanu and Bady Minck, are currently at the International Film Festival Rotterdam (Iffr) (Jan 21-Feb 1) for the world premiere of its new film, Dreams Rewired narrated by Tilda Swinton.

Speaking in Rotterdam, the producers revealed that the first project in development with Jelinek is La Belle Dormeuse (The Beautiful Woman Sleeping), to be directed by Ulrike Ottinger. It is described by the producers as “a modern feminist vampire story”.

The second is Die Liebhaberinnen (Women As Lovers), which is adapted from Jelinek’s 1975 novel of the same name and will be directed by newcomer Caroline Kox.

Amour Fou is already producing a short film by Kox, titled Casting A Woman.

The Jelinek projects are likely to shoot in 2016.

Ambitious projects

In the meantime, the company »

- geoffrey@macnab.demon.co.uk (Geoffrey Macnab)

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Sundance Film Review: ‘The Witch’

23 January 2015 9:32 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

A fiercely committed ensemble and an exquisite sense of historical detail conspire to cast a highly atmospheric spell in “The Witch,” a strikingly achieved tale of a mid-17th-century New England family’s steady descent into religious hysteria and madness. Laying an imaginative foundation for the 1692 Salem witchcraft trials that would follow decades later, writer-director Robert Eggers’ impressive debut feature walks a tricky line between disquieting ambiguity and full-bore supernatural horror, but leaves no doubt about the dangerously oppressive hold that Christianity exerted on some dark corners of the Puritan psyche. With its formal, stylized diction and austere approach to genre, this accomplished feat of low-budget period filmmaking will have to work considerable marketing magic to translate appreciative reviews into specialty box-office success, but clearly marks Eggers as a storyteller of unusual rigor and ambition.

A New England-born, Brooklyn-based talent who started out in the theater, Eggers has several film »

- Justin Chang

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Berlin Film Festival Completes Competition Lineup

19 January 2015 2:08 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

London — Berlin Film Festival chief Dieter Kosslick has completed his Competition section lineup, with films by Wim Wenders, Pablo Larrain and Oliver Hirschbiegel among the latest additions.

Wenders’ 3D film “Every Thing Will Be Fine” stars James Franco, Charlotte Gainsbourg and Rachel McAdams. Franco plays Tomas, a writer who accidentally causes the death of a child and spends the next 12 years examining the effect of the tragedy on his life and that of Kate, the child’s mother.

As previously announced, the festival is to present Wenders with an honorary Golden Bear for lifetime achievement, and will screen 10 of his movies as part of an homage. Wenders directed seminal pics like “Paris, Texas” and “Wings of Desire,” and has been nominated three times for an Oscar, most recently for “The Salt of the Earth.”

Larrain’s “The Club,” which was shot off the radar, turns on four disgraced priests, who »

- Leo Barraclough

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87th Oscar Nominations – Birdman and The Grand Budapest Hotel Lead With Nine Each

15 January 2015 8:37 AM, PST | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Good Morning Oscar fans! Today is nomination day!

Wamg was in the thick of nomination morning fever at the home of the Oscars – the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences. 

Prior to the announcement, A.M.P.A.S. and the show’s producing team, Craig Zadan and Neil Meron, gave the press assembled in the Samuel Goldwyn Theatre a first look at the new Oscar promo featuring host Neil Patrick Harris, titled “Anything Can Happen,” and given what went down this morning, that’s certainly the case.

Let’s get right to the big shockers – No Lego Movie for Best Animated Feature or Life Itself in Best Documentary Feature.

Also missing among the presumed nominees were Ava DuVernay (Selma, directing), Clint Eastwood (American Sniper, directing), Jennifer Aniston (Cake, best actress), David Oyelowo (Selma, best actor), Jake Gyllenhaal (Nightcrawler, best actor), Ralph Fiennes (The Grand Budapest Hotel, best actor), Gillian Flynn (Gone Girl, »

- Movie Geeks

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Top 100 Most Anticipated Foreign Films of 2015: #9. Michael Haneke’s Flashmob

9 January 2015 8:45 AM, PST | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Flashmob

Director: Michael Haneke // Writer: Michael Haneke

The cinema of Michael Haneke may be described as cold, distant, even isolating, as the Austrian auteur prizes the examination of estrangement and the discontent of families or individuals trapped within the confines of what we refer to as modern society. He also cares little for coddling audiences, often directly criticizing what we’ve come to expect and desire from cinematic narratives. Starting out as a director in television in the early 1970′s, it would be his 1989 feature debut The Seventh Continent that first garnered attention, followed by 1992′s Benny’s Video (starring Angela Winkler), which played at Director’s Fortnight, as did his 1994 title 71 Fragments of a Chronology of Chance. In 1997, Haneke would direct a television adaptation of Kafka’s The Castle, starring Susanne Lothar and Ulrich Muhe, the acting couple that would headline one of his most galvanizing titles also that year with Funny Games, »

- Nicholas Bell

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

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