Mr. and Mrs. James Elkins and Mr. and Mrs. Dent were warm friends. The Dents had a little boy named Harry, while the Elkins had a little girl, Maud. These two children were playmates and ... See full summary »
Reviews

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Storyline

Mr. and Mrs. James Elkins and Mr. and Mrs. Dent were warm friends. The Dents had a little boy named Harry, while the Elkins had a little girl, Maud. These two children were playmates and were always teasing each other. One day while playing, Harry sprang up and pursued Maud, who ran away as fast as her little legs could carry her. She goes a long way and turns into a deserted street. A gypsy happened along, took her by the hand and led her away. Harry followed and arrived just in time to see Maud disappear with the gypsy. Harry then returned home as fast as he could and informs his parents and Mr. and Mrs. Elkins. Careful search was made, but no trace of her could be discovered. Fifteen years elapse. Maud's disappearance is now a mere memory. Harry, grown to manhood, is riding, in his automobile past a gypsy encampment when the chauffeur discovers that the machine requires water. Harry goes to the camp to procure some, and while there, meets a girl, with whom he falls in love. He pays... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Short | Drama

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

5 January 1911 (USA)  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

The story has no claim to strength
1 November 2015 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

The tale of a little girl, lost while a child, or carried away by the Gypsies. Fifteen years later her former playmate stops at a Gypsy encampment to get water for his automobile, sees the girl, falls in love with her and later they are married. After misfortunes they discover that they were former playmates and both families are rejoiced at the discovery of the daughter lost so many years ago. The interest in the picture is principally in the scenic effects. The story has no claim to strength. The acting and photography are quite up to the standard of the Imp pictures, consequently the audience enjoys it, though they are not called upon to consider any great tragedy. - The Moving Picture World, January 28, 1911


0 of 0 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page