Aida Travis, a mother but not a wife, finds her child a burden and abandons the infant by secretly placing it on the steps of the dwelling of a wealthy man. The butler finds it and caries ... See full summary »
Reviews

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Storyline

Aida Travis, a mother but not a wife, finds her child a burden and abandons the infant by secretly placing it on the steps of the dwelling of a wealthy man. The butler finds it and caries it to the chapel door of Father Jules, the priest of the parish. Sixteen years elapse and Vera is a beautiful girl, budding into womanhood and is beloved by her companions. Aida revisits the scenes of her early shame, attired in the height of fashion. At a gay party she meets Harlow Ellsworth, who is touring the country. Harlow leaves the party to go on a jaunt and meets era as she emerges from the chapel. He accosts her politely and she is not averse to his well-meant attentions. He walks with her to her home and she poses at the gate for a photograph to add to the collection of the tourist. They part with an implied understanding that they will meet again. Harlow and Vera go rowing and he shows her the proof of her photograph and then tells her he loves her. The halt near Father Jules, who is ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Short | Drama

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

30 March 1911 (USA)  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

It is generally the woman who suffers for her folly
5 January 2016 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

Seen with the Rex film "As Ye Sow," mentioned elsewhere, this one presents a different view and one which perhaps is more in keeping with the usages of society. In this instance it is the woman who suffers, and that is as life goes. It is generally the woman who suffers for her folly; the man goes free. After years this mother is reunited with her daughter, but a priest intervenes and prevents the mother making herself known. She is commended to the nuns for consolation. Little can be said about such a film. Undoubtedly it presents a true view of the consequences which usually follow sinning. The sympathy of the audience will be aroused for the unfortunate woman, yet possibly had she returned in a different way, showing less indications of a continuation of a sinful life, the priest would have relented and allowed her to meet her daughter. This possibility adds to the interesting complications and develops in the minds of the audience questions which will make the film linger long in the memory. - The Moving Picture World, April 15, 1911


0 of 0 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Discuss So Shall Ye Reap (1911) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page