6.1/10
4,815
33 user 27 critic

Stolen (2009)

Stolen Lives (original title)
Trailer
2:03 | Trailer

On TV

Airs Sun. Dec. 17, 9:55 AM on TMC

ON DISC
A detective deals with the loss of his own son while trying to uncover the identity of a boy whose mummified remains are found in a box buried for fifty years.

Director:

Writer:

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Matthew Wakefield
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Diploma / Rogianni
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John Wakefield
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Rose Montgomery
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Jonas
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William Daniels
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Swede
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Police Chief
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Officer JJ
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Pete Dunne
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Mark Wakefield
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Storyline

A detective deals with the loss of his own son while trying to uncover the identity of a boy whose mummified remains are found in a box buried for fifty years.

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Secrets from the past don't stay buried.


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for a scene of sexuality | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Official Sites:

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Release Date:

10 October 2009 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Stolen  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Budget:

$2,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$1,391, 19 March 2010, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$7,306, 4 April 2010
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

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Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Screenwriter Glenn Taranto wrote his first draft of the screenplay, originally titled "The Boy in the Box", in six days over a two week period. He was inspired by the famous unsolved case of "America's Unknown Child" aka The Boy In The Box. Working backwards Glenn created an original scenario detailing how such an unsolved crime might have occurred. Should anyone have any information regarding the real "Boy In The Box" case they are encouraged to contact the Philadelphia, PA Police Department. See more »

Goofs

Throughout the investigation, they refer to the events happening in the spring of 1958 but on the wife's tombstone, they have her death listed as Nov 1958. All the events happened AFTER her death. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Tom Adkins Sr.: He has his mother's eyes. Her hair. My face, my laugh. First time I held him I knew he was my son. The best of me and his mother. I can still see his eyes light up watching those fireworks. I gave him everything a father can give a son. And now with all this searching, being a cop, being a father, I still can't find my boy.
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Connections

References One Way Passage (1932) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Fifty years on...
26 May 2012 | by See all my reviews

This thriller, starring "Mad Men's" John Hamm, while watchable, ultimately fails through implausible plotting and the contrived use of coincidence.

Consider Hamm's anguished cop, who, at a Fourth of July pageant, in the mere minutes it took him to go to and from the toilet in a diner establishment, finds the son who accompanied him has apparently disappeared as if into thin air, never to return. It later transpires that he encounters the perpetrator just outside the diner, so how has he managed to spirit away his son and got back to the pageant in those mere minutes?

Years pass, with Hamm unable to get over his loss and attendant guilt, the emotional distance between him and his wife widening close to separation point, when a child's body is unearthed, bearing similarities to his own child and immediately throwing suspicion on a long-interred suspect. The movie then moves back and forth in time from the present-day to 1958 where we see enacted the story of the disappearance (thankfully, there are no scenes depicting the actual murder of the children) of the first child and the truth is gradually brought to light as the stories converge.

That's quite a lot to bring together in a mere 90 minutes and after all the exposition, the ending is wound up in double quick time, with a too blatant slip by the murderer and too easily obtained subsequent confession. I also thought the 1958 story was more involving, if more implausible than the present-day one, contriving a "Postman Always Rings Twice" dalliance between the father and a local femme-fatale, complete with jealous husband, unbalancing the narrative, although the transitions between the two time-frames were cleverly done, with dissolves on the shared crime-scene exhibits.

The acting was okay, Hamm jutting his jaw and running his hand through his hair in familiar angst-ridden fashion, although I thought the better acting was done by Josh Lucas as his 1950's counterpart, conveying just the right composite of Henry Fonda crossed with James Stewart as the drifter at the mercy of fate, while Morena Baccarin and James Van der Beek playing respectively the slack wife and the murderer made strong, if brief impressions too.

In the end, this was a fairly routine thriller, lacking somewhat in tension, characterisation and credibility, with more of the aspects of a TV movie than Hollywood feature. I don't think I'd pay to watch it, seeing it on the small-screen seemed about right.


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