Medicine for Melancholy
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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

1-20 of 28 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Barry Jenkins Reacts to ‘Moonlight’ Becoming A24’s Highest-Grossing Film

18 May 2017 9:34 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Moonlight” is officially A24’s highest-grossing release ever, as the surprise Best Picture winner recently surpassed the $25 million domestic takes of both “Ex Machina” and “The Witch.” Its foreign returns are even higher, as co-writer/director Barry Jenkins noted on Twitter yesterday: $37 million. All together, the film has earned $65 million in box-office receipts.

Read More: A24: Why Barry Jenkins, Sofia Coppola and James Franco Love Working With the Indie Distributor

“Wow wow wow — haven’t checked in on this in a minute. That international number just puts me all in my feels ✊,” tweeted Jenkins, who wrote the script alongside Tarell Alvin McCraney. “Moonlight” received a total of eight Academy Award nominations, also winning in the Adapted Screenplay and Best Supporting Actor (Mahershala Ali) categories.

Read More: A24 After ‘Moonlight’: Why They’re Finally Ready To Conquer the Older Arthouse Crowd

The film, which will be available to stream »

- Michael Nordine

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Exclusive: Why Barry Jenkins Was in Tears After Directing ‘Dear White People’ Episode 5

8 May 2017 9:10 AM, PDT | Entertainment Tonight | See recent Entertainment Tonight news »

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Intense.” It’s easily the one word to describe “Chapter V” of Justin Simien’s Netflix series, Dear White People.

“It was intense, bro,” says Barry Jenkins, the Oscar-winning filmmaker behind Moonlight, who stepped in to direct the episode, which is a largely satirical take on racial tension at a predominately white Ivy League-type campus told through the eyes of black students upended when campus security is called to a party and pulls a gun on a black student named Reggie (Marque Richardson).

The scene comes near the end of an episode that sees Reggie, a student activist, and his friends journey (via several enjoyable walk-and-talks) through campus from one event to the next before arriving at a party where he and a white student (Nolan Funk) get into a racially charged confrontation over singing the N word along to a Future song. As tensions »

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‘The Fate of the Furious’ Will Be Another Week Leading the Box Office

20 April 2017 6:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

No dramatic tension here: “The Fate of the Furious” (Universal) again will be the top box-office performer in its second weekend, continuing its worldwide push to over $1 billion. Even with a steep fall (likely 55% to 60%), it could end up grossing double what we expect from the five new releases combined.

The next two weeks will see eight new mainstream releases, an unusually high number, and all are standalone, non-franchise entries. That’s rare these days. But unlike “Get Out,” “Hidden Figures,” and “La La Land” — three original movies that grossed $150 million or more at home in the last five months — none of the upcoming titles should do more than minor business.

Read More: ‘The Fate of the Furious’ Breaks ‘Star Wars: The Force Awakens’ International Box Office Records — But Not So At Home

“Fate” virtually tied “Star Wars: The Force Awakens” in worldwide box office (of note: only »

- Tom Brueggemann

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SXSW 2017 Promises Indie Breakthroughs and Heavy Hitters

10 March 2017 8:30 AM, PST | backstage.com | See recent Backstage news »

The world may change, but South by Southwest will stay in Austin, Texas. Entertainment and tech industry creatives once again descend upon Austin for nine jam-packed days of the SXSW Conference and Festivals March 10–19. SXSW stands apart from other festivals because it’s not a studio feeding frenzy, but rather an environment of creativity and innovation where emerging, independent talents are celebrated alongside established Hollywood stars branching out into uncharted terrain. Dozens of top actors and directors got their big break in the Texas capital. “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story” director Gareth Edwards credits the festival with connecting him to his agent after the premiere of his first feature “Monsters,” while “Moonlight” Oscar winner Barry Jenkins’ first film, “Medicine for Melancholy,” also made its debut in Austin. Recent world premieres have included the Oscar-winning sci-fi thriller “Ex-Machina,” Paul Feig’s comedy megahit “Bridesmaids,” and Destin Daniel Cretton’s “Short Term 12, »

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Why Barry Jenkins’ Second Home Is Miami’s Tiny, Eccentric, and Inspiring Borscht Film Festival

9 March 2017 6:34 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

As film nonprofits go, Miami’s Borscht Corp has a different way of doing things. Whether it’s buying a speedboat as the first step in fundraising for a feature, or “canceling” a secret party on social media to throw off the cops, Borscht’s organizational methods are as experimental and visionary as the work it produces. That includes the Borscht Film Festival, a “quasi-yearly” event showcasing films, sculpture, performances, and installations by emerging regional filmmakers.

While Borscht may sound obscure, it lies at the heart of Barry Jenkins’ success. When Borscht co-founder (and “Moonlight” co-producer) Andrew Hevia saw Miami native Jenkins’ first feature, the San Francisco-set “Medicine for Melancholy,” he became determined to bring Jenkins back to Miami to shoot a film. Borscht commissioned a short film from Jenkins, “Chlorophyl,” for the 2011 festival. “That sort of re-awakened [Jenkins] to the city,” said Borscht co-founder Lucas Leyva, an accomplished filmmaker and producer himself. »

- Jude Dry

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‘Moonlight’ Postmortem: How To Win Best Picture in 5 (Not So) Easy Steps

1 March 2017 9:28 AM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Let’s talk about the biggest news of an unforgettable Oscar night — and it’s got nothing to do with the Twitter-happy accountant who apparently gave Warren Beatty the wrong envelope. Here’s the real story: A $1.5 million gay, African-American, coming-of-age movie won Best Picture.

It’s the first gay movie to grab the big prize, one that was denied “Brokeback Mountain” a decade ago. It’s the first Best Picture winner with an all-black cast. It also showed that when a small-scale indie is involved, guild wins (“La La Land” won the PGA,”Hidden Figures” took SAG Ensemble) are no longer reliable Oscar predictors.

And never underestimate the potential of the underdog to come from behind (See: “12 Years a Slave,” “Spotlight,” “Argo”). This year’s passion vote was split among three movies: “La La Land,” “Moonlight,” and “Manchester By the Sea.”

Here’s how everything went right for “Moonlight. »

- Anne Thompson

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‘Moonlight’ Postmortem: How To Win Best Picture in 5 (Not So) Easy Steps

1 March 2017 9:28 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Let’s talk about the biggest news of an unforgettable Oscar night — and it’s got nothing to do with the Twitter-happy accountant who apparently gave Warren Beatty the wrong envelope. Here’s the real story: A $1.5 million gay, African-American, coming-of-age movie won Best Picture.

It’s the first gay movie to grab the big prize, one that was denied “Brokeback Mountain” a decade ago. It’s the first Best Picture winner with an all-black cast. It also showed that when a small-scale indie is involved, guild wins (“La La Land” won the PGA,”Hidden Figures” took SAG Ensemble) are no longer reliable Oscar predictors.

And never underestimate the potential of the underdog to come from behind (See: “12 Years a Slave,” “Spotlight,” “Argo”). This year’s passion vote was split among three movies: “La La Land,” “Moonlight,” and “Manchester By the Sea.”

Here’s how everything went right for “Moonlight. »

- Anne Thompson

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Damien Chazelle and Barry Jenkins on That Oscars Shocker: The Morning-After Interview

1 March 2017 4:30 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

When Barry Jenkins returned to his hotel suite at the Four Seasons Monday at 3 a.m. after a surreal night at the Oscars, he slept for a couple of hours, then watched a clip of the show’s ending on his cell phone, finding something oddly enchanting about those final shocking moments that unfolded on live TV Sunday night.

“It’s messy, but it’s kind of gorgeous,” says the writer/director of “Moonlight,” describing the instant that he, the audience at the Dolby Theatre, and 33 million viewers were stunned to learn that his movie, not Damien Chazelle’s “La La Land,” had actually won the best picture prize. “You have these two groups of people who came together for a second. There’s a picture with me hugging Jordan [Horowitz, a producer of “La La Land”], and Adele [Romanski, producer of “Moonlight”] has her arm on his shoulder. That’s what the moment was.”

Gavin Bond for Variety

In an odd way, »

- Kristopher Tapley

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Watch ‘Moonlight’ Oscar Winner Barry Jenkins’ Student Short Film ‘My Josephine’

28 February 2017 7:44 AM, PST | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Filmmaking can be a battle, and sometimes it pays to have your friends by your side. And Oscar winner Barry Jenkins, whose “Moonlight” took home Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Supporting Actor, and of course, Best Picture at the Oscars, has kept his colleagues close. His short student film “My Josephine” featured cinematography by James Laxton and production design by Joi McMillon, both of whom would go on to work with him on “Moonlight” (Laxton stayed behind the camera and also worked on Jenkins’ debut feature “Medicine For Melancholy,” while McMillon stepped into the editing bay with Nat Sanders, who also worked on ‘Medicine’).

Continue reading Watch ‘Moonlight’ Oscar Winner Barry Jenkins’ Student Short Film ‘My Josephine’ at The Playlist. »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Why the ‘Moonlight’ Oscar Upset Was Even Wilder If You Were in the Room

27 February 2017 11:21 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Three days before the craziest surprise ending in Oscar history, “Moonlight” director Barry Jenkins was hanging out at a party in West Hollywood and musing on the days ahead. “So,” he said, putting his arms around a colleague and me, “What are my odds?”

We exchanged the usual possibilities — “Moonlight” had a real shot in the Adapted Screenplay category, even if “La La Land” was the presumed Best Picture frontrunner — and I asked him how he was handling the tail-end of a campaign that runs even the toughest promoters into the ground. “You know,” he said, “you kind of run out of material after a while.”

However, by the end of an otherwise predictable ceremony Sunday night, “Moonlight” delivered new material for the ages. As the universe now knows, the evening concluded with Faye Dunaway reading the title of the wrong movie, leading to a bracing moment of unscripted television »

- Eric Kohn

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Barry Jenkins Wins Independent Spirit Best Director Award For ‘Moonlight’

26 February 2017 | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

In a small sign that some things are still right in the world, Barry Jenkins took home the Independent Spirit Award for Best Director at the 2017 Film Independent Spirit Awards.

It was the fifth award of the night for “Moonlight,” which also won for editing, cinematography, screenplay and the Robert Altman Award that recognizes an ensemble cast, director and casting director of a film.

Sporting a sharp Hawaiian button up befitting of the Miami native, Jenkins called out fellow directors Andrea Arnold and Kenneth Lonergan (whom he apparently calls “Uncle Kenny”), for making work that inspires him. Thanking his cast and crew, Jenkins concluded by saying: “This thing it has my name about it, but it’s absolutely about all y’all. Much love.” Also nominated were Pablo Larrain for “Jackie,” Jeff Nichols for “Loving,” and Kelly Reichardt for “Certain Women,” in addition to Arnold.

Read More: 2017 Independent Spirit Awards: »

- Jude Dry

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“Moonlight” Wins the Independent Spirit Award for Best Screenplay

25 February 2017 3:25 PM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Moonlight” screenwriters Barry Jenkins and Tarell Alvin McCraney won the Best Screenplay Award at the 2017 Film Independent Spirit Awards.

Read More: IndieWire’s Final Oscar 2017 Predictions: ‘La La Land’ Will Win Nine of Its 14 Nominations

Director-writer Barry Jenkins dedicated the award to producer Adele Romanski, who told Jenkins that after taking years to follow up his first feature (“Medicine for Melancholy”) he needed to “get the fuck off the couch, get out of the country and write.”

McCraney quoted scripture in his acceptance speech, referencing the “diverse temptations” that he and Jenkins experienced growing up in the Liberty City section of Miami.  He thanked Jenkins “for looking at that life and thinking that was a story worth telling and sharing.”

Also nominated were Kenneth Lonergan for “Manchester by the Sea,” Mike Mills for “20th Century Women,”  Ira Sachs and Mauricio Zacharias for “Little Men,” and Taylor Sheridan for “Hell or High Water. »

- Chris O'Falt

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“I Was at a Point in My Life When I Needed to Take a Risk”: Barry Jenkins on his Debut Feature, Medicine for Melancholy

24 February 2017 3:43 PM, PST | Filmmaker Magazine - Blog | See recent Filmmaker Magazine news »

Nominated for Best Director and Best Picture Academy Awards for his beautiful and incisive Moonlight, Barry Jenkins has long appeared in the pages of Filmmaker. He was a 25 New Face in 2008 and then, just months later, graced our Winter, 2009 cover for his debut feature, Medicine for Melancholy. Online for the first time, here is my interview with Jenkins about the film, an interview that’s a great read and a fascinating look back at the career beginnings of one of our best directors. 2/27/17 Update: And now he won the f’in Oscar for Best Picture!!!!!!! — Sm Usually […] »

- Scott Macaulay

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‘Moonlight’ Director Barry Jenkins Almost Didn’t Become a Filmmaker, But Now He’s an Oscar Heavyweight: Awards Spotlight

20 February 2017 3:38 PM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

A year ago, Barry Jenkins was still a secret of the indie film world, having directed a well-liked but little-seen movie in 2008 (“Medicine for Melancholy”). He kept busy with shorts, commercial work, and various unfinished projects — but it wasn’t until “Moonlight” surfaced in the fall of 2016 that Jenkins’ career jumped to a whole new level.

The beloved drama about an alienated African-American boy in Miami, which takes place across three time periods, emerged as an unlikely hit just as awards season took flight. To date, it has grossed over $21 million in the U.S. The momentum continued with eight Academy Award nominations, including two for Jenkins in the directing and adapted screenplay categories. He also picked up writing and directing prizes from the New York Film Critics Circle, the National Board of Review, the WGA, and others.

No matter what happens at the ceremony, Jenkins’ success is a startling accomplishment. »

- Eric Kohn

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‘Awards Chatter’ Podcast — Barry Jenkins (‘Moonlight’)

19 February 2017 2:00 PM, PST | Scott Feinberg | See recent Scott Feinberg news »

Barry Jenkins (Courtesy: Getty Images)

By: Scott Feinberg

The Hollywood Reporter

“I have this fundamental block — maybe I’ll always have it, maybe I’ll get past it — but I am essentially Chiron, I grew up like this kid and there are just certain ceilings that I never can imagine myself breaking through,” says Barry Jenkins, the writer and director of Moonlight, as we sit down in his downtown Los Angeles apartment to record an episode of The Hollywood Reporter‘s ‘Awards Chatter’ podcast. “When they happen,” the 37-year-old continues, “they genuinely are an extreme surprise. And for whatever reason, I can’t get through this block that Chiron does not grow up and make a film that gets eight Academy Award nominations.” He then pauses, smiles and quietly adds, “But I guess he does.”

Jenkins, for his work on the acclaimed drama about a young man growing up black »

- Carson Blackwelder

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Moonlight review – a five-star symphony of love

19 February 2017 1:00 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Barry Jenkins’s Oscar-nominated coming-of-age film is a heartbreaking, uplifting, minor-key masterpiece

“Who is you?” This question echoes throughout Moonlight, the breathtaking second feature from Medicine for Melancholy director Barry Jenkins. A coming-of-age story about a young man from a hardscrabble Miami neighbourhood, this kaleidoscopic gem focuses on three periods of its subject’s life, chaptered by the different names and identities he assumes, or is given – “Little”, “Chiron” and “Black”. Lending heartfelt voice to characters who have previously been silenced or sidelined, Moonlight is an astonishingly accomplished work – rich, sensuous and tactile, by turns heartbreaking and uplifting. The first time I saw it I swooned; the second time I cried like a baby. I can’t wait to see it again.

Inspired by playwright Tarell Alvin McCraney’s postgraduate theatre project “In Moonlight Black Boys Look Blue”, Jenkins’s film opens with a scrawny kid nicknamed “Little” (Alex Hibbert »

- Mark Kermode, Observer film critic

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Brad Pitt Leveraged His Name and Shingle for ‘Moonlight’

16 February 2017 9:38 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Of the nine films nominated for best picture, fully one-third would not exist were it not for an A-list movie star leveraging personal clout to get the movie made in a system that simply doesn’t take those kinds of risks these days.

Fences” is by far the most conventional example: Paramount had acquired the rights to August Wilson’s Pulitzer Prize-winning play in 1987 for Eddie Murphy to star, though it took three decades — and Denzel Washington’s involvement — to get it made.

Matt Damon willed “Manchester by the Sea” into existence. The project originated when Damon commissioned a script from playwright Kenneth Lonergan (coming off a trying experience on “Margaret,” in which Damon played a small role). Though he had originally entertained the idea of starring in “Manchester” himself, Damon ultimately decided to give the lead role to longtime amigo Ben Affleck’s kid brother, Casey.

But of the three projects, »

- Peter Debruge

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Exclusive Interview: Director Barry Jenkins on Moonlight

14 February 2017 2:20 AM, PST | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Freda Cooper talks to director Barry Jenkins about the Oscar-nominated Moonlight

A portrait of African American life and a meditation on family, friendship and identity, Moonlight chronicles the life of a young black man as he grows up in a rough part of Miami.  For its director, Barry Jenkins, it was also a personal project, as he grew up in the very same part of the city where the story is set.

He spoke exclusively to Freda Cooper just days after the film received a total of eight Oscar nominations.

Let’s go back to the beginning.  This is based on a play, which I believe has never been produced?

It’s never been produced and I don’t think it’s producible in the form that it was in.  I’d describe it as being somewhere half way between the stage and the screen, and I stand by that. »

- Freda Cooper

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‘Moonlight’ Has 8 Oscar Nominations, But An Adapted Screenplay Win Is Almost Guaranteed

13 February 2017 7:06 AM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Don’t abandon hope, “Moonlight” lovers.

On Sunday, the BAFTAs shut out “Moonlight,” which had four nominations. Among them, writer-director Barry Jenkins competed in the Original Screenplay category against eventual BAFTA winner Kenneth Lonergan (“Manchester By the Sea”). These two also compete at the Writers Guild. On Oscar night February 26th, when “Moonlight” has eight chances to win, it should take home at least one Oscar in another category, Best Adapted Screenplay.

The BAFTA for Adapted Screenplay went to Australian writer Luke Davies for “Lion.” But at Saturday’s USC Scripter Awards, which have accurately predicted the adapted category for the last six years, “Moonlight” beat “Lion.” On Oscar night, “Moonlight” should do that again.

Here’s how the Adapted Screenplay Oscar race shakes out.

Barry Jenkins and Tarell Alvin McCraney (“Moonlight”)

The Academy moved two scripts, “Moonlight” and “Loving,” from Original to Adapted. Technically, the play Jenkins adapted with McCraney, »

- Anne Thompson

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‘Moonlight’ Has 8 Oscar Nominations, But An Adapted Screenplay Win Is Almost Guaranteed

13 February 2017 7:06 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Don’t abandon hope, “Moonlight” lovers.

On Sunday, the BAFTAs shut out “Moonlight,” which had four nominations. Among them, writer-director Barry Jenkins competed in the Original Screenplay category against eventual BAFTA winner Kenneth Lonergan (“Manchester By the Sea”). These two also compete at the Writers Guild. On Oscar night February 26th, when “Moonlight” has eight chances to win, it should take home at least one Oscar in another category, Best Adapted Screenplay.

The BAFTA for Adapted Screenplay went to Australian writer Luke Davies for “Lion.” But at Saturday’s USC Scripter Awards, which have accurately predicted the adapted category for the last six years, “Moonlight” beat “Lion.” On Oscar night, “Moonlight” should do that again.

Here’s how the Adapted Screenplay Oscar race shakes out.

Barry Jenkins and Tarell Alvin McCraney (“Moonlight”)

The Academy moved two scripts, “Moonlight” and “Loving,” from Original to Adapted. Technically, the play Jenkins adapted with McCraney, »

- Anne Thompson

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

1-20 of 28 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


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