Green Lantern
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The following FAQ entries may contain spoilers. Only the biggest ones (if any) will be covered with spoiler tags. Spoiler tags are used sparingly in order to make the page more readable.

For detailed information about the amounts and types of (a) sex and nudity, (b) violence and gore, (c) profanity, (d) alcohol, drugs, and smoking, and (e) frightening and intense scenes in this movie, consult the IMDb Parents Guide for this movie. The Parents Guide for Green Lantern can be found here.

The film is based on the comic book character, Green Lantern, published by DC Comics. The story is based on Green Lantern: Secret Orign. The film follows the same basic story and most of the events of Secret Origin though it features Parallax instead of Atrocitus.

To date, there have been seven human Green Lanterns in the comics. The first Green Lantern is the Golden Age superhero Alan Scott. Scott was an engineer who found a magic green lantern made from a meteor. He made a ring that allowed him to tap the powers of the "Starheart". He originally had no connection to the Green Lantern Corps, but it was later stated his lantern is from the Corps' early days and is an honorary member. His weakness is wood. The second Lantern is the Silver Age Hal Jordan. This was the first human Lantern in the Corps, the intergalactic police force seen in the film. All members of the Corps are vulnerable to the yellow impurity (derived from Parallax being imprisoned in the Central Battery on Oa) though they can overcome it with enough experience and courage. The third is the Bronze Age Guy Gardner. He was Abin Sur's ring's second choice but farther away than Jordan, and later became Jordan's backup. He was removed from the Corps but later readmitted as an Honor Guard training new recruits. The fourth is fellow Bronze Age John Stewart, one of DC's first African-American superheroes. He was an architect and marine who replaced a comatose Gardner as Jordan's backup. When Jordan resigned from the Corps John was the regular Lantern. He now serves alongside Jordan as his regular duty partner and later with Rayner after the Blackest Night event as an Honor Guard and Gardner following the New 52 reboot. The fifth is Modern Age Kyle Rayner. Rayner was an artist who was chosen by the last Guardian of the Universe after the Parallax-possessed Jordan destroyed most of the Corps. He was possessed by Ion, the green equivalent to Parallax, and later by Parallax. He then was partnered with Gardner and later Stewart as an Honor Guard. The sixth Lantern is the Modern Age Jade, the daughter of Alan Scott. She had the same powers as her father, though without the need for a ring or lantern. During this time she was also vulnerable to wood. After her resurrection, she joined the Corps and was given a ring. The seventh and final Green Lantern Simon Baz was introduced during the relaunched Green Lantern series after the New 52 reboot. Simon is an Arab-American who has faced persecution because of the Arab peoples connection to 9/11 and was a minor league criminal and suspected terrorist that was falsely accused before the ring that Sinestro had before he and Jordan were apparently murdered by the Guardians had chosen him as its next wielder and Baz decided to work on turning over a new leaf after becoming a Green Lantern. As of the "New 52" continuity there are currently five human lanterns Jordan, Gardner, Stewart, Rayner, and Baz, with both Alan Scott and Jade no longer in existence. However, a younger version of Alan Scott is being used as part of DC's "Earth 2" continuity which is cast in an alternate universe.

The movie focuses on the second Lantern introduced, Harold "Hal" Jordan. The producers briefly considered making the movie about Scott. But Jordan is more popular and introduced the greater Green Lantern mythology. Scott was in early versions of the Jordan-centered movie but eventually written out. Gardner was in the script as a small role with potential to be expanded, but not included in the movie. Former marine and current actor/model Nick Jones was rumored to play Stewart in a cameo, but the movie makes no mention of Stewart.

Yes, but not at the end of the credits. It occurs after the animated credits are shown and before the scrolling credits. Sinestro puts on a yellow ring, and his green lantern suit turns to yellow. It is not explained in the film but the colour yellow is the Achilles heel of Green Lanterns. In the older versions of the comics the colour yellow is the Green Lantern's weakness. However, this will most likely not be covered. The point of the yellow suit is that Sinestro has succumbed to the power of fear. Will is Green, Fear is Yellow, and Sinestro will most likely be the main antagonist of the next movie if it is made using fear as his weapon rather than Will. In the comics, Sinestro takes the yellow ring and creates a "Sinestro Corps", because he thinks the power of fear is stronger. He also feels betrayed and missunderstood by the guardians.

No, Green Lantern is a monocular-to-binocular conversion. It was originally filmed in regular/2D, but during post-production, the decision was made for the film to be post converted into Digital 3D. The additional budget for the film during post-production included 3D effects added to the film at the last minute.

Before this movie was released, it was stated that a sequel was being developed by writer Michael Goldenberg. On June 26th, 2011, a top studio source told The Hollywood Reporter (THR) that Warner Brothers had given the green light to a sequel despite being "somewhat disappointed" by the first movie's results. The next day, a studio spokesman told THR that no decision had been made. In the ensuing years, there had not been any further developments. The reference made to a green-colored superhero in Deadpool (2016) starring Green Lantern star Ryan Reynolds left the impression that he wouldn't be interested in returning to the role of Hal Jordan (though it might be more of a matter of whether a real costume were made and worn instead of the widely-criticized, post-production digital effects approach being taken).

When it was announced in August that a fourteen minutes longer extended cut was to be released fans hoped that it could improve the movie. Unfortunately, the result is rather disappointing. A comparison showed that the difference is only 9 minutes and 33 seconds (excluding credits). The additional scenes are also only plot scenes that do not improve the movie, its story or main characters. There is no more action, relevant new story elements or a deeper insight in Hal Jordan and his problems. Nonetheless one can find a very detailed comparison between both versions with pictures here.

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