Shutter Island
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Connect with IMDb



2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007

1-20 of 59 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


Newswire: Christoph Waltz is in talks for Robert Rodriguez’s Battle Angel Alita

10 hours ago | avclub.com | See recent The AV Club news »

The cast and crew for that adaptation of Yukito Kishiro’s Battle Angel Alita seems to be slowly coming together. First, Robert Rodriguez took up the directing mantle from James Cameron, who’s apparently still co-writing the film with Laeta Kalogridis (Shutter Island). Then we learned that Rosa Salazar (Maze Runner: The Scorch Trials) would be stepping into the titular role as an amnesiac, martial-arts-expert cyborg bounty hunter. (Yes, this is based on a manga comic book series. How did you guess?) And now we’re finding out that two-time Oscar winner Christoph Waltz is likely to take on another big part in the film.

As The Hollywood Reporter tells it, the 59-year-old Austrian-German actor is in talks to play Doctor Dyson Ido, the cybersurgeon who finds Alita in a junkyard and trains her as a master Hunter Warrior. Before you consider that this will be the second time that »

- Dennis DiClaudio

Permalink | Report a problem


Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘The Nice Guys,’ ‘Sunset Song,’ ‘Woman in the Dunes,’ and More

23 August 2016 8:15 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

The Nice Guys (Shane Black)

It’s been over 40 years since Chinatown, and roughly the same amount of time separates the events of that film from those of The Nice Guys, another tale of a private detective in Los Angeles taking on an initially simple case which leads him to a vast, environmentally centered criminal conspiracy. The Nice Guys even carries on Chinatown’s heartbeat of individual helplessness when confronted with the casual body disposal of profit-hungry industrialists. »

- The Film Stage

Permalink | Report a problem


What Happened? Seven Films That Left Us Hanging

6 August 2016 6:34 AM, PDT | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

 Most people like to see resolution in films but not every filmmaker gives us that. Sometimes, they just leave us wondering. While there are times this can be just a symptom of bad writing or editing, it can also be an excellent way to get people to leave the theater thinking. In the hands of a clever and talented filmmaker, this technique can make a good film even more interesting. Here are seven good movies that don’t give us the answers we expect.

 Rashomon (1950) The Plot: In feudal Japan, a priest, a woodcutter and another man are taking refuge from a bad rainstorm in the ruins of an old army gatehouse called Rashômon. The priest and the woodcutter are discussing the trial of a bandit accused of the murder of a samurai whose body was found by the woodcutter in a forest grove. Both men have been called to testify. »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Rob Young)

Permalink | Report a problem


Sword Art Online The Movie: Ordinal Scale Goes Live-Action

4 August 2016 4:57 PM, PDT | Comicmix.com | See recent Comicmix news »

Sword Art Online The Movie: Ordinal Scale, based on the smash hit light novel series published by Kadokawa’s Dengeki Bunko boasting worldwide sales of 19 million copies, is set for its global premiere in spring 2017.

In partnership with the Kadokawa Corporation, Skydance Media, a U.S.-based diversified media company, has acquired the worldwide live-action rights for Sword Art Online.

Having already spawned a comic book series, two TV anime adaptations, and video games, and with its first theatrical film, Sword Art Online The Movie: Ordinal Scale, set for worldwide release in spring 2017, this marks Sword Art Online’s first foray into live-action television. It will be developed as a TV series based on the storyline of the original series.

According to the studio, the story premise is:

2022 – The NerveGear, the world’s first dedicated full-dive device developed by the genius programmer, Akihiko Kayaba. It was a revolutionary machine that »

- ComicMix Staff

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Sword Art Online’ Headed to Television with a Live-Action Series

3 August 2016 8:30 AM, PDT | TVovermind.com | See recent TVovermind.com news »

Sword Art Online, the Japanese series of “light novels” that became an extremely successful and popular anime series in 2012, is about to make an even bigger dent in pop culture. Skydance Media, whose television credits include Manhattan and Grace and Frankie, has acquired the television rights for Sword Art Online and is fast-tracking the series for a live-action debut. The pilot for the series is being written by Laeta Kalogridis (Shutter IslandTerminator Genisys), and Skydance CEO David Ellison says that he has plans for the series to go far beyond television and is looking to “launch a full-scale and wide-ranging set of live action

Sword Art Online’ Headed to Television with a Live-Action Series »

- Jasef Wisener

Permalink | Report a problem


Anime Franchise Sword Art Online Spawns Live-Action TV Series At Skydance

2 August 2016 3:15 PM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Skydance Media has snapped up the global live-action rights to Sword Art Online, the über-popular Japanese anime franchise that centers on a bleeding-edge Vr role-playing game. Alita: Battle Angel and Shutter Island scribe Laeta Kalogridis is attached to write the pilot episode, while also holding an executive producer credit opposite David Ellison, Dana Goldberg, and Marcy Ross.

Tracing its roots back to Reki Kawahara’s novel series, Sao was birthed in 2009 and imagines a near-future where budding players delve into the title alternate reality via the NerveGear, a head-mounted device that stimulates all five of the user’s senses to create an unprecedented and immersive experience. It has since gone on to inspire two TV anime adaptations, a spinoff anime special and an upcoming anime film. Beyond that, Sword Art Online also spans multiple manga series, games, and a virtual reality demonstration in Japan.

“At Skydance we are in the »

- Michael Briers

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Sword Art Online’ Japanese Anime Franchise Being Adapted as TV Show

2 August 2016 9:02 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Sword Art Online,” the popular Japanese novel and anime franchise, is being developed for a live-action TV series, Variety has learned.

Skydance Media has acquired the television rights, and has put the potential series on the fast-track with “Terminator Genisys” scribe Laeta Kalogridis penning the pilot.

The project marks the first-ever live-action television series for the “Sword Art Online” phenomenon, also known as Sao, which is based on the popular light novel series of 22 books by author Reki Kawahara. Almost 19 million print copies of the novels have sold worldwide, and the books have been spun off into nine comic adaptations, two anime television series, a video game, and merchandise program, in addition to an animated film that will be released in Japan next year.

The Skydance Television series, which is being produced in partnership with the Kadokawa Corporation, will follow a brilliant young beta tester and his group of friends who are trapped alongside 10,000 other people in »

- Elizabeth Wagmeister

Permalink | Report a problem


Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘The Lobster,’ ‘High-Rise,’ ‘Louder Than Bombs,’ and More

2 August 2016 7:34 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

April and the Extraordinary World (Christian Desmares and Franck Ekinci)

Most writing on Christian Desmares and Franck Ekinci‘s April and the Extraordinary World speaks as though they’ve adapted one of revered Frenchman Jacques Tardi‘s graphic novels. This isn’t quite the case. What they’ve actually done is bring his unique “universe” to life with help from previous collaborator Benjamin Legrand (writer of Tardi’s Tueur de cafards) instead. Legrand and Ekinci crafted this alternate »

- The Film Stage

Permalink | Report a problem


Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘The New World,’ ‘Sing Street,’ African-American Cinema and More

26 July 2016 6:22 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

The New World (Terrence Malick)

Terrence Malick is a filmmaker who has always valued photogenic artistry over narrative thrust, content to let his stories and characters wash over the audience like a crashing wave. There are few directors who indulge in such visual splendor, his creative aphorism seemingly being beauty for the sake of beauty. For Lubezki’s first collaboration with the director, The New World, it was also an opportunity for him to shoot (at least partially) on 65mm. »

- The Film Stage

Permalink | Report a problem


Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Sing Street,’ ‘A Touch of Zen,’ ‘To Have and Have Not,’ and More

19 July 2016 8:51 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Night & Fog (Alain Resnais)

Ten years after the liberation of the Nazi concentration camps, filmmaker Alain Resnais documented the abandoned grounds of Auschwitz and Majdanek in Night and Fog (Nuit et brouillard), one of the first cinematic reflections on the Holocaust. Juxtaposing the stillness of the abandoned camps’ empty buildings with haunting wartime footage, Resnais investigates humanity’s capacity for violence, and presents the devastating suggestion that such horrors could occur again. – Criterion

Sing Street (John Carney)

Returning »

- The Film Stage

Permalink | Report a problem


Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Green Room,’ ‘Everybody Want Some!!,’ ‘My Golden Days’ & More

12 July 2016 7:26 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Belladonna of Sadness (Eiichi Yamamoto)

It all begins with Once Upon a Time. Such a simple introduction for Belladonna of Sadness, a 1973 Japanese animated feature whose newfound legacy includes a decades-long disappearance, a dramatic re-emergence, and a growing reputation as a frenzied, pornographic freakout. The final entry in anime elder statesman Osamu Tezuka‘s erotic Animerama trilogy has remained largely unknown to even the most die-hard cult cinephiles, a fate determined after its commercial failure bankrupted Tezuka’s production company, »

- The Film Stage

Permalink | Report a problem


Michelle Williams In Line To Join The Greatest Showman With Hugh Jackman And Zac Efron

6 July 2016 2:56 PM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Deadline brings word that Michelle Williams, the decorated actress who shot to fame through roles in Shutter Island, Blue Valentine and My Week with Marilyn, has opened negotiations to join musical biopic The Greatest Showman.

Should a deal fall into place, Williams will join Neighbors 2 star Zac Efron and Hugh Jackman in the feature, and it’s understood the latter has been attached to the P.T Barnum biopic for years at this point.

Held up as the first totally original live-action musical in close to two decades, The Greatest Showman comes bearing a script from award-winning scribe Michael Arndt, working from drafts penned by Jenny Bicks, Bill Condon and Jonathan Tropper. Charting the three-ring act known as Barnum & Bailey Circus, Jackman and Co. will chronicle Barnum’s defining impact on show business in the 19th century. It’ll also welcome the X-Men stalwart back into the genre of musicals, »

- Michael Briers

Permalink | Report a problem


Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Only Yesterday,’ ‘The In-Laws,’ ‘Boy & the World’ & More

5 July 2016 8:35 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Boy & the World (Alê Abreu)

Crayon-like scribblings and simple geometric patterns meticulously complicate themselves like a fractal over the course of this child’s-eye odyssey through the global struggle between humankind and the forces that oppress it. Kaleidoscopic visuals use repetition to explore the communal nature of both work and celebration. This film continually pulls back to show the larger picture of society, its visuals becoming more complex in kind, before it reduces to a more intimate view »

- The Film Stage

Permalink | Report a problem


Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Dr. Strangelove,’ ‘Clouds of Sils Maria,’ ‘Cemetery of Splendor,’ and More

28 June 2016 7:31 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Cemetery of Splendor (Apichatpong Weerasethakul)

If it is by now redundant to say that Thai filmmaker Apichatpong Weerasethakul (who understands pronunciation troubles and insists people call him “Joe”) is truly in a class of his own, we might blame both the general excellence of his output — a large oeuvre consisting of features, shorts, and installations — and the difficulty that’s often associated with describing them in either literal or opinion-based terms. The further one gets into his work, »

- The Film Stage

Permalink | Report a problem


Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Knight of Cups,’ ‘Midnight Special,’ ‘Embrace of the Serpent,’ and More

21 June 2016 7:56 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Embrace of the Serpent (Ciro Guerra)

With its focus on the effects of exploration by white men on foreign lands, Ciro Guerra’s Oscar-nominated Embrace of the Serpent will inevitably be compared to Werner Herzog’s stories of savage nature, and while Guerra is investigating some of Herzog’s most well trodden themes, the chaos of man exists in the background, while the unspoiled sit front and center here. Embrace of the Serpent centers on two explorers, separated by decades in time, »

- The Film Stage

Permalink | Report a problem


13 great modern thriller directors

14 June 2016 9:59 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

facebook

twitter

google+

They’ve made some of the best thrillers of the past six years. We list some of the best modern thriller directors currently working...

Director Guillermo del Toro once described suspense as being about the withholding of information: either a character knows something the audience doesn’t know, or the audience knows something the character doesn’t. That’s a deliciously simple way of describing something that some filmmakers often find difficult to achieve: keeping viewers on the edges of their seats.

The best thrillers leave us scanning the screen with anticipation. They invite us to guess what happens next, but then delight in thwarting expectations. We can all name the great thriller filmmakers of the past - Alfred Hitchcock, Carol Reed, Brian De Palma - but what about the current crop of directors? Here’s our pick of the filmmakers who’ve made some great modern thrillers over the past six years - that is, between the year 2010 and the present.

Jeremy Saulnier - Blue Ruin, Green Room

To think there was once a time when Jeremy Saulnier was seriously quitting the film business.

“To be honest," Saulner told us back in 2014, “Macon and I had really given up on our quest to break into the industry and become legitimate filmmakers. So what we were trying to do with Blue Ruin was archive our 20 year arc and bring it to a close. Really just revisit our stomping grounds and use locations that were near and dear to us and build a narrative out of that.”

Maybe this personal touch explains at least partly why Blue Ruin wound up getting so much attention in Cannes in 2013, signalling not the end of Saulnier and his star Macon Blair’s career, but a brand new chapter. But then again, there’s more than just hand-crafted intimacy in Saulnier’s revenge tale; there’s also its lean, minimal storytelling and the brilliance of its characterisation. Blue Ruin is such an effective thriller because its protagonist is so atypical: sad-eyed, inexperienced with guns, somewhat soft around the edges, Macon Blair’s central character is far from your typical righteous avenger.

Green Room, which emerged in the UK this year, explores a similar clash between very ordinary people and extraordinary violence. A young punk band shout about anarchy and aggression on stage, but they quickly find themselves out of their depth when they’re cornered by a group of bloodthirsty neo-Nazis. In Saulnier’s films, grubby, unseemly locations are matched by often beautiful locked-off shots. Familiar thriller trappings are contrasted by twists of fortune that are often shocking.

Denis Villeneuve - Sicario, Prisoners

Here’s one of those directors who can pack an overwhelming sense of dread in a single image: in Sicario, his searing drug-war thriller from last year, it was the sight of tiny specks of dust falling in the light scything through a window. That single shot proved to be the calm before the storm, as Villeneuve unleashed a salvo of blood-curdling events: an attempted FBI raid on a building gone horribly awry. And this, I think, is the brilliance of Villeneuve’s direction, and why he’s so good at directing thrillers like Sicario or 2013’s superb Prisoners - he understands the rhythm of storytelling, and how scenes of quiet can generate almost unbearable tension.

Another case in point: the highway sequence in Sicario, where Emily Blunt’s FBI agent is stuck in a traffic jam outside one of the most violent cities in the world. Villeneueve makes us feel the stifling heat and the claustrophobia; something nasty’s going to happen, we know that - but it’s the sense of anticipation which makes for such an unforgettable scene.

Prisoners hews closely to the template of a modern mystery thriller, but it’s once again enriched by Villeneuve’s expert pacing and the performances he gets out of his actors. Hugh Jackman’s seldom been better as a father on the hunt for his missing child, while Jake Gyllenhaal mesmerises as a cop scarred by his own private traumas.

Lynne Ramsay - We Need To Talk About Kevin

Ramsay’s We Need To Talk About Kevin may be the most effective psychological thriller of recent years. About the difficult relationship between a mother (Tilda Swinton) and her distant, possibly sociopathic son (Ezra Miller), Ramsay’s film is masterfully told from beginning to end - which is impressive, given that the source novel by Lionel Shriver is told via a series of letters. Ramsay takes the raw material from the book and crafts something cinematic and highly disturbing: a study of guilt, sorrow and recrimination. Tension bubbles even in casual conversations around the dinner table. Miller is an eerie, cold-eyed blank. Swinton is peerless. One scene, in which Swinton’s mother comes home in the dead of night, is unforgettable. Here’s hoping Ramsay returns with another feature film very soon.

Morten Tyldum - Headhunters

All kinds of thrillers have emerged from Scandinavia over the past few years, whether on the large or small screen or in book form. Morten Tyldum’s Headhunters is among the very best of them. The fast-paced and deliriously funny story of an art thief who steals a painting from the wrong guy, Headhunters launched Tyldum on an international stage - Alan Turing drama The Imitation Game followed, and the Sony sci-fi film Passengers is up next. It isn’t hard to see why, either: Headhunters shows off Tyldum’s mastery of pace and tone, as his pulp tale hurtles from intense chase scenes to laugh-out-loud black comedy.

Joel Edgerton - The Gift

Granted, Joel Edgerton’s better known as an actor, having turned in some superb performances in the likes of Warrior, Zero Dark Thirty and Warror. But with a single film - The Gift, which he wrote, directed, produced and starred in - Edgerton established himself as a thriller filmmaker of real promise. About a successful, happily married couple whose lives are greatly affected by an old face from the husband’s past, The Gift is an engrossing, unsettling movie with superb performances from Jason Bateman and Rebecca Hall as well as Edgerton.

A riff on the ‘killer in our midst’ thrillers of the 80s and 90s - The Stepfather, The Hand That Rocks The Cradle and so on - The Gift is all the more effective because of its restraint. We’re never quite sure who the villain of the piece is, at least at first - and Edgerton’s use of the camera leaves us wrong-footed at every turn. The world arguably needs more thrillers from Joel Edgerton.

If you haven’t seen The Gift yet, we’d urge you to track it down.

David Michod - Animal Kingdom

The criminals at play in this true-life crime thriller are all the more chilling because they’re so mundane - a bunch of low-level thieves, murderers and gangsters who prowl around the rougher parts of Melbourne, Australia. Writer-director David Michod spent years developing Animal Kingdom, and it was worth the effort: it’s an intense, engrossing film, for sure, but it’s also a believable glimpse of the worst of human nature. Ben Mendelsohn and Jacki Weaver play villains of different kinds; the latter a manipulative grandmother who looks over her brood of criminals, the former a spiteful thief. Crafting moments of incredible tension from simple exchanges, Michod launched himself as a formidable talent with this feature debut.

Ben Affleck - The Town, Argo

Affleck’s period drama-thriller Argo won all kinds of awards, but we’d argue his earlier thrillers were equally well made. Gone Baby Gone was a confident debut and an economical adaptation of Dennis LeHane’s novel. The Town, released in 2010, was a heist thriller that made the most of its Boston setting. One of its key scenes - a bank robbery in which the thieves wear a range of bizarre outfits, including a nun’s habit - is masterfully staged. With Affleck capable of teasing out great performances from his actors and staging effective set-pieces, it’s hardly surprising he’s so heavily involved in making at least one Batman movie for Warner - as well as playing the hero behind the mask.

Anton Corbijn - The American, A Most Wanted Man

The quiet, almost meditative tone of Anton Corbijn’s movies mean they aren’t necessarily to everyone’s taste, but they’re visually arresting and almost seductive in their rhythm and attention to detail. Already a celebrated photographer, Corbijn successfully crossed over into filmmaking with Control, an exquisitely-made drama about Joy Division lead singer Ian Curtis. Corbijn took a markedly different direction with The American, a thriller about an ageing contract killer (George Clooney) who hides out in a small Italian town west of Rome. Inevitably, trouble eventually comes calling.

Corbijn’s direction remains gripping because he doesn’t give us huge action scenes to puncture the tension. We can sense the capacity for violence coiled up beneath the hitman’s calm exterior, and Corbijn makes sure we only see rare flashes of that toughness - right up until the superbly-staged climax.

A Most Wanted Man, based on the novel by John le Carre, is a similarly astute study of an isolated yet fascinating character - in this instance, the world-weary German intelligence agent Gunther Bachmann, brilliantly played by Philip Seymour Hoffman. Tragically, the film proved to be one of the last before Hoffman’s death in 2014.

Paul Greengrass - Green Zone, Captain Phillips

Mention Greengrass’ name, and the director’s frequent use of handheld cameras might immediately spring to mind. But time and again, Greengrass has proved a master of his own personal approach - you only have to look at the muddled, migraine-inducing films of his imitators to see how good a director Greengrass is. Part of the filmmakers’ visual language rather than a gimmick, Greengrass’ camera placement puts the viewer in the middle of the story, whether it’s an amnesiac agent on the run (his Bourne films) or on a hijacked aircraft (the harrowing United 93). While not a huge hit, Green Zone was an intense and intelligent thriller set in occupied Iraq. The acclaimed Captain Phillips, meanwhile, was a perfect showcase for Greengrass’ ability to fuse realism and suspense; the true story of a merchant vessel hijacked by Somali pirates, it is, to quote Greengrass himself, “a contemporary crime story.”

John Hillcoat - Lawless, Triple 9

We can’t help thinking that, with a better marketing push behind it, Triple 9 could have been a much bigger hit when it appeared in cinemas earlier this year. It has a great cast - Chiwetel Ejiofor, Norman Reedus, Anthony Mackie and Aaron Paul as a group of seasoned thieves, Kate Winslet cast against type as a gangland boss - and its heist plot rattles along like an express train.

Hillcoat seems to have the western genre pulsing through his veins, and he excels at creating worlds that are desolate and all-enveloping, whether his subjects are period pieces (The Proposition, Lawless) or post-apocalyptic dramas (The Road). Triple 9 sees Hillcoat make an urban western that is both classic noir and entirely contemporary; his use of real cops and residents around the film’s Atlanta location give his heightened story a grounding that is believable in the moment. Nowhere is this more in evidence than in the scene in which Casey Affleck’s cop breaches a building while hunkered down behind a bullet-proof shield. Hillcoat places us right there in the scene with Affleck and the cops sneaking into the building behind him; we sense the claustrophobia and vulnerability.

Hillcoat explained to us in February that this sequence wasn’t initially written this way in the original script; it changed when the director and his team discovered how real-world cops protect themselves in real-world situations. In Triple 9, research and great filmmaking combine to make an unforgettably intense thriller.

Jim Mickel - Cold In July

Seemingly inspired by such neo-Noir thrillers as Red Rock West and Blood Simple, 2014‘s Cold In July is a genre gem from director Jim Mickle (Stake Land, We Are What We Are). Michael C Hall plays an ordinary guy in 80s America who shoots an intruder who breaks into his home, and becomes drawn into a moody conspiracy that takes in crooked cops, porn and a private eye (who's also keen pig-rearer) played by Don Johnson. Constantly shifting between tones, Mickel’s thriller refuses to stick to genre expectations. In one scene, after Hall shoots the burglar dead, Mickel’s camera lingers over the protagonist as he cleans up the blood and glass. It’s touches like these that make Cold In July far more than a typical thriller.

Mickel’s teaming up with Sylvester Stallone next; we’re intrigued to see what that partnership produces.

Martin Scorsese - Shutter Island

As a filmmaker, Scorsese needs no introduction. As a director of thrillers, he’s in a class of his own: from Taxi Driver via the febrile remake of Cape Fear to the sorely underrated Bringing Out The Dead, his films are full of suspense and the threat of violence. Shutter Island, based on the Dennis LeHane novel of the same name, saw Scorsese plunge eagerly into neo-noir territory. A murder mystery set in a mental institution on the titular Shutter Island, its atmosphere is thick with menace. Like a combination of Robin Hardy's The Wicker Man and Adrian Lyne’s cult classic Jacob’s Ladder, Shutter Island’s one of those stories where we never know who we can trust - even the protagonist, played by Leonardo DiCaprio.

David Fincher - The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo, Gone Girl

After the trial by fire that was Alien 3, David Fincher found his footing in the 90s with such hits as Seven and The Game. In an era where thrillers were in much greater abundance, from the middling to the very good, Seven in particular stood out as a genre classic: smartly written, disturbing, repulsive and yet captivating to look at all at once. Fincher’s affinity for weaving atmospheric thrillers continued into the 2010s, first with The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo, a superb retelling of Stieg Larsson’s book which didn’t quite find the appreciative audience deserved, and Gone Girl, an even better movie which - thankfully - became a hit.

Based on Gillian Flynn’s novel (and adapted by the author herself), Gone Girl is both a gripping thriller and a thoroughly twisted relationship drama. Fincher’s mastery of the genre is all here: his millimetre-perfect composition, seamless touches of CGI and subtle yet effective uses of colour and shadow. While not a straight-up masterpiece like the period thriller Zodiac, Gone Girl is still a glossy, smart and blackly funny yarn in the Hitchcock tradition. If there’s one master of the modern thriller currently working, it has to be Fincher.

See related  John Hillcoat interview: Triple 9, crime, fear of comic geniuses Jim Mickle interview: Cold In July, thrillers, Argento Jeremy Saulnier interview: Green Room, John Carpenter Jeremy Saulnier interview: making Blue Ruin & good thrillers Denis Villeneuve interview: Sicario, Kurosawa, sci-fi, ugly poetry Morten Tyldum interview: The Imitation Game, Cumberbatch, Headhunters Paul Greengrass interview: Captain Phillips & crime stories Movies Feature Ryan Lambie thrillers 15 Jun 2016 - 06:11 Cold In July Triple 9 Shutter Island Gone Girl David Fincher Martin Scorsese John Hillcoat Directors thrillers movies »

Permalink | Report a problem


Recommended Discs & Deals: ’10 Cloverfield Lane, ’45 Years,’ ‘La Chienne,’ and More

14 June 2016 6:43 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

10 Cloverfield Lane (Dan Trachtenberg)

Forget the Cloverfield connection. The actors who were in this film didn’t even know what the title was until moments before the first trailer dropped. Producer J.J. Abrams used that branding as part of the wrapping for its promotional mystery box, but the movie stands perfectly alone from 2008’s found-footage monster picture. Hell, 10 Cloverfield Lane perhaps doesn’t even take place within the same fictional universe as that film — although a friend asked if it’s secretly a Super 8 sequel, and, honestly, you could think of it as one without contradicting anything in either movie. Whether the Cloverfield name fills you with wariness or enthusiasm, it would be unwise to burden Dan Trachtenberg‘s film with such prejudices. – Dan S. (full review)

45 Years (Andrew Haigh)

Andrew Haigh’s third feature as a director, 45 Years, is an excellent companion piece to its 2011 predecessor, Weekend. The latter examined the inception of a potential relationship between two men over the course of a weekend, whereas its successor considers the opposite extreme. Again sticking to a tight timeframe, the film chronicles the six days leading up to a couple’s 45th wedding anniversary. Though highly accomplished, Weekend nevertheless suffered from a tendency towards commenting on itself as a gay issues film, which at times overrode the otherwise compelling realism. Despite treating material arguably even more underrepresented in cinema – senior relationships – Haigh avoids this same self-reflexive pitfall in 45 Years, pulling off an incisive and emotionally ensnaring tour de force. – Giovanni M.C. (full review)

Here Comes Mr. Jordan (Alexander Hall)

A sophisticated supernatural Hollywood comedy whose influence continues to be felt, Here Comes Mr. Jordan stars the eminently versatile Robert Montgomery as a working-class boxer and amateur aviator whose plane crashes in a freak accident. He finds himself in heaven but is told, by a wry angel named Mr. Jordan (Claude Rains), that his death was a clerical error, and that he can return to Earth by entering the body of a corrupt (and about-to-be-murdered) financier—whose soul could use a transplant. Nominated for seven Oscars (it won two) and the inspiration for a sequel with Rita Hayworth and two remakes, Alexander Hall’s effervescent Here Comes Mr. Jordan is comic perfection. – Criterion.com

La Chienne (Jean Renoir)

Jean Renoir’s ruthless love triangle tale, his second sound film, is a true precursor to his brilliantly bitter The Rules of the Game, displaying all of the filmmaker’s visual genius and fully imbued with his profound humanity. Michel Simon cuts a tragic figure as an unhappily married cashier and amateur painter who becomes so smitten with a prostitute that he refuses to see the obvious: that she and her pimp boyfriend are taking advantage of him. Renoir’s elegant compositions and camera movements carry this twisting narrative—a stinging commentary on class and sexual divisions—to an unforgettably ironic conclusion. – Criterion.com

Also Arriving This Week

Eddie the Eagle (review)

Hello, My Name is Doris (review)

Get a Job (review)

Gold

Recommended Deals of the Week

Top Deal: A selection of Clint Eastwood and Steven Spielberg Blu-rays are under $10 this week.

All the President’s Men (Blu-ray) – $7.79

The American (Blu-ray) – $6.68

Amelie (Blu-ray) – $8.99

The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford (Blu-ray) – $7.88

Beginners (Blu-ray) – $6.11

Bone Tomahawk (Blu-ray) – $9.99

The Brothers Bloom (Blu-ray) – $9.99

The Cabin in the Woods (Blu-ray) – $9.99

Casino (Blu-ray) – $9.49

The Conformist (Blu-ray) – $14.49

Cloud Atlas (Blu-ray) – $7.99

Crimson Peak (Blu-ray) – $8.99

Dear White People (Blu-ray) – $9.99

The Deer Hunter (Blu-ray) – $10.61

Eastern Promises (Blu-ray) – $8.57

Ex Machina (Blu-ray) – $8.00

The Grand Budapest Hotel (Blu-ray) – $5.99

The Guest (Blu-ray) – $9.49

Hail, Caesar! (Blu-ray) – $12.99

Heat (Blu-ray) – $7.88

Holy Motors (Blu-ray) – $10.59

The Informant! (Blu-ray) – $8.07

Inglorious Basterds (Blu-ray) – $4.99

Interstellar (Blu-ray) – $5.00

The Iron Giant (Blu-ray pre-order) – $9.99

Jaws (Blu-ray) – $7.88

John Wick (Blu-ray) – $8.00

Kiss Kiss Bang Bang (Blu-ray) – $9.69

Kumiko, the Treasure Hunter (Blu-ray) – $9.89

The Lady From Shanghai (Blu-ray) – $8.99

Looper (Blu-ray) – $7.88

Lost In Translation (Blu-ray) – $9.49

Macbeth (Blu-ray) – $11.99

Mad Max: Fury Road (Blu-ray) – $10.00

Magic Mike Xxl (Blu-ray) – $11.99

Magnolia (Blu-ray) – $9.19

The Man Who Wasn’t There (Blu-ray) – $9.49

Margaret (Blu-ray) – $9.49

Martha Marcy May Marlene (Blu-ray) – $6.99

The Master (Blu-ray) – $12.69

Michael Clayton (Blu-ray) – $7.98

Nebraska (Blu-ray) – $9.35

Never Let Me Go (Blu-ray) – $7.99

No Country For Old Men (Blu-ray) – $5.99

Non-Stop (Blu-ray) – $8.99

Obvious Child (Blu-ray) – $9.99

Pan’s Labyrinth (Blu-ray) – $7.99

ParaNorman (Blu-ray) – $7.98

Pariah (Blu-ray) – $9.98

Persepolis (Blu-ray) – $5.79

Prisoners (Blu-ray) – $10.49

Pulp Fiction (Blu-ray) – $8.48

Raging Bull: 30th Anniversary Edition (Blu-ray) – $10.19

Re-Animator (Blu-ray) – $9.99

Rio Bravo (Blu-ray) – $5.99

Road to Perdition (Blu-ray) – $8.99

The Searchers / Wild Bunch / How the West Was Won (Blu-ray) – $10.36

Sex, Lies, and Videotape (Blu-ray) – $5.88

Short Term 12 (Blu-ray) – $9.89

Shutter Island (Blu-ray) – $6.79

A Separation (Blu-ray) – $6.80

A Serious Man (Blu-ray) – $7.22

A Single Man (Blu-ray) – $6.00

The Social Network (Blu-ray) – $9.96

Spotlight (Blu-ray) – $9.99

Steve Jobs (Blu-ray) – $9.99

Straight Outta Compton (Blu-ray) – $10.00

Synecdoche, NY (Blu-ray) – $6.89

There Will Be Blood (Blu-ray) – $8.20

They Came Together (Blu-ray) – $9.99

The Tree of Life (Blu-ray) – $6.99

Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (Blu-ray) – $5.52

Volver (Blu-ray) – $5.95

Where the Wild Things Are (Blu-ray) – $7.99

Whiplash (Blu-ray) – $9.99

The Witch (Blu-ray) – $14.96

The Wrestler (Blu-ray) – $7.00

See all Blu-ray deals.

What are you picking up this week?

»

- The Film Stage

Permalink | Report a problem


Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Hail, Caesar!,’ ‘Anomalisa,’ ‘Le Amiche,’ and More

7 June 2016 6:38 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Anomalisa (Charlie Kaufman and Duke Johnson)

Charlie Kaufman, the writer behind Being John Malkovich and Adaptation, teams up with animator Duke Johnson to create a complex emotional drama starring lifelike puppets. The premise is riddled with existential dread of modern-day life, presented uniquely through Kaufman’s idiosyncratic point-of-view. For protagonist and self-help author Michael Stone (voiced soulfully by David Thewlis), everyone around him has the same voice (thanks to Tom Noonan) and nothing feels right. It isn’t »

- The Film Stage

Permalink | Report a problem


Win Passes To The Advance Screening Of Now You See Me 2 In St. Louis

31 May 2016 9:27 AM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

The master magicians known as the Four Horsemen return for their most daring and astounding caper ever, elevating the limits of stage illusion to new heights in hopes of clearing their names and exposing the ruthlessness of a dangerous tech magnate.

One year after their astonishing Robin Hood-style magic shows win the public’s adulation and confound the FBI, the quartet resurfaces for a dazzling comeback performance that will make their previous escapades seem like child’s play. With the help of FBI Special Agent Dylan Rhodes (Mark Ruffalo), the Horsemen — J. Daniel Atlas (Jesse Eisenberg), Merritt McKinney (Woody Harrelson), Jack Wilder (Dave Franco) and new addition Lula (Lizzy Caplan) — mount a meticulously planned surprise appearance, in hopes of exposing corrupt tech tycoon Owen Case (Ben Lamb).

But their scheme backfires, exposing Dylan’s involvement with the Horsemen and sending all five of them back on the run. To regain »

- Movie Geeks

Permalink | Report a problem


Recommended Discs & Deals: Wim Wenders, ‘City of Women,’ ‘Horse Money,’ and More

31 May 2016 8:06 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

City of Women (Federico Fellini)

Federico Fellini‘s epic 1980 fantasia introduced the start of the Maestro’s delirious late period. A surrealist tour-de-force filmed on soundstages and locations alike, and overflowing with the same sensory (and sensual) invention heretofore found only in the classic movie-musicals (and Fellini’s own oeuvre), La città delle donne [City of Women] taps into the era’s restless youth culture, coalescing into nothing less than Fellini’s post-punk opus. Marcello Mastroianni appears as Fellini’s alter »

- The Film Stage

Permalink | Report a problem


2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007

1-20 of 59 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners