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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007

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Star Trek Actor Leonard Nimoy Dead at 83

28 February 2015 2:29 AM, PST | WorstPreviews.com | See recent Worst Previews news »

Leonard Nimoy, the actor, director and author, known mostly for his work on "Star Trek," has passed away at his Bel Air home due to complications from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. He was 83 years old. Nimoy started his acting career in early 1950s, which mostly included guest spots on shows like "The Outer Limits" and "The Man From Uncle." But in 1966, he signed on to play Mr. Spock on Gene Roddenberry's NBC series "Star Trek," which would go on to air for only three seasons. Thanks to a cult following, the show spawned an animated series, twelve feature films, four spin-off shows, video games, theme park rides and lots of merchandise. After directing the third and fourth films in the "Star Trek" franchise, he proved to be a talent behind the camera, going on to direct the 1987 hit "Three Men and a Baby." In recent years, Nimoy appeared in »

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A Tribute to Leonard Nimoy: The Man Who Made Logic Cool

28 February 2015 1:00 AM, PST | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

Long before the internet and the ‘age of the geek’, a man wearing pointy ears made it cool to be a computer whiz. Leonard Nimoy will forever be remembered as that Vulcan science officer from the starship Enterprise, Mr. Spock. Sadly, he has left this world now, but while he was here, he lived long and he prospered.

Even if you’re not a science fiction fan, everyone knows Mr. Spock. He’s one of the most recognizable TV characters ever portrayed on screen. His Vulcan salute and catchphrase “Live long and prosper” have become part of pop culture. Spock made being an outsider fashionable. Long before Wolverine became popular as the outcast among outcasts, Spock was a half-breed genius anomaly among a group of space explorers, neither fully human nor fully alien. He was the oddity of the show and people loved him for it.

Before Star Wars came along, »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Rob Young)

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A Tribute to Leonard Nimoy: The Man Who Made Logic Cool

28 February 2015 1:00 AM, PST | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

 

Long before the internet and the ‘age of the geek’, a man wearing pointy ears made it cool to be a computer whiz. Leonard Nimoy will forever be remembered as that Vulcan science officer from the starship Enterprise, Mr. Spock. Sadly, he has left this world now, but while he was here, he lived long and he prospered.

Even if you’re not a science fiction fan, everyone knows Mr. Spock. He’s one of the most recognizable TV characters ever portrayed on screen. His Vulcan salute and catchphrase “Live long and prosper” have become part of pop culture. Spock made being an outsider fashionable. Long before Wolverine became popular as the outcast among outcasts, Spock was a half-breed genius anomaly among a group of space explorers, neither fully human nor fully alien. He was the oddity of the show and people loved him for it.

Before Star Wars came along, »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Rob Young)

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The Life of Spock

27 February 2015 10:00 PM, PST | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

When people think of Star Trek, some will think immediately of William Shatner as James T Kirk.  However, I suspect most would agree they first think of Leonard Nimoy as the iconic green blooded half-breed Vulcan, Mr. Spock.

To this date Leonard has been on more Star Trek movies than any other actors from The Original Series, starring in 8 films to date.  This speaks volumes of him as an actor and a beloved character by both directors and Trekkies alike.

 

Film and TV

In 1951 Nimoy started his acting career at the young age of 20 where he played a football jock named Chief on the film Queen for a Day which was based on the New York based radio program, Queen for Today.

 

Within the same year he played a baseball player in the film Rhubard, a film about feral cat that inherits a fortune and a professional league baseball team. »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Mike Petty)

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Leonard Nimoy in His Own Words: How Spock Changed Me

27 February 2015 3:54 PM, PST | Entertainment Tonight | See recent Entertainment Tonight news »

Following Leonard Nimoy's passing, Et is looking back at the time we spent with the actor best known for his role as Mr. Spock in the original Star Trek television and movie series.

In his first interview with Et in 1982, Nimoy cherished the idea of giving fans more than they would get from the average TV show.

News: President Obama and Celebs React to Nimoy's Death

"The series, while it was extremely good entertainment, at the same time offered food for thought," Nimoy said at the time. "The messages are there and there are enough ideas present for people to interpret them as they see fit."

Nimoy dedicated himself to his job and enjoyed enriching people's lives through his work, as Et learned on the set of Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home.

"There are two challenges here," Nimoy said in 1986. "One is to be different. The other is to try to be consistently better than the »

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Chris Meloni to Star in Wgn Slavery Drama Underground — With Kanye West Eyed as Musical Contributor

27 February 2015 2:59 PM, PST | TVLine.com | See recent TVLine.com news »

Chris Meloni’s latest project is pointing him north.

RelatedPilot Season ’15: Scoop on This Fall’s (Possible) New Shows, Who’s In Them

The Law & Order: Svu and True Blood vet has landed a lead role in Wgn America’s period drama Underground — which has been ordered straight to series.

The one-hour drama “follows a group of slaves who plan a daring escape from a Georgia plantation to cross 600 miles to freedom, aided along the way by a secret abolitionist couple running a station on the Underground Railroad,” according to the network. To succeed, they’ll have to “evade »

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Leonard Nimoy 1931-2015: 6 non-Star Trek career highlights

27 February 2015 1:22 PM, PST | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Leonard Nimoy became an icon of science fiction in the 1960s for his timeless role in Star Trek as the Enterprise's chief science officer Mr Spock – a character he would play on and off for more than 45 years.

While Nimoy will always be best remembered for his work on the Star Trek television shows and movies, he also had an incredibly varied career as an accomplished writer, director, musician and photographer.

In celebration of Nimoy's life and legacy, we look back at six career highlights aside from his work in the Star Trek franchise.

1. Mission: Impossible (1969–71)

Nimoy became a household name in the pioneering science fiction series Star Trek, but even early on he sought to make his career choices as diverse as possible.

Following on the heels of Star Trek's shocking cancellation, Nimoy was cast in Mission: Impossible, another highly influential 1960s television series.

Nimoy became a viewer »

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The Week in Television: Leonard Nimoy’s Passing, Gaga on American Horror Story & New Arrow and Flash Spin-Off

27 February 2015 12:43 PM, PST | TVovermind.com | See recent TVovermind.com news »

Another week in television has gone by, and it has brought with it a great deal of exciting news about some of television’s most popular shows, including Arrow, American Horror Story, and Empire. Unfortunately, however, this week ends on quite the sad note, as Leonard Nimoy, best known for being Star Trek‘s Spock, passed away earlier today after a battle with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In addition to his role as Spock, Nimoy’s other TV credits included Fringe and Mission Impossible, and he will, without a doubt, be missed. So, on a much more somber note than usual, let’s dive into this week’s biggest headlines. – The Dancing With the Stars Season 20 cast was announced this week, and it includes the likes of Patti Labelle, Michael Sam, and The Hunger GamesWillow Shields. Additionally, Derek Hough, who was initially believed to be not be returning for »

- Chris King

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Entertainment News: Leonard Nimoy, Spock of ‘Star Trek,’ Dies at 83

27 February 2015 12:16 PM, PST | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Los Angeles – The actor who created one of the greatest pop-culture characters in TV and film history has passed away. Leonard Nimoy will always be known for the role of Mr. Spock, science officer for the USS Enterprise of the “Star Trek” TV and film series. He died of pulmonary disease on Feb. 27, 2015, according to his wife Susan. He was 83.

Leonard Nimoy as Mr. Spock in ‘Star Trek’ (2009)

Photo credit: Paramount Pictures

The legacy of “Star Trek” had much to do with Nimoy’s approach to the character of Spock. The backstory of the half-human, half-Vulcan character was one of logic over conflict, yet his character could always be relied on when situations got confrontational. For three seasons in the 1960s and in rerun heaven, the voyage of the Starship Enterprise captivated viewers and was resurrected in a highly popular film series. Nimoy also was a photographer, director, writer and »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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Leonard Nimoy: A Tribute to the Most Human of Aliens

27 February 2015 12:00 PM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Did Leonard Nimoy ever use double negatives in conversation? Did he need to consult his cellphone calculator to figure out the tip on a restaurant bill? Did he understand who put that wormhole in space in Interstellar? Most of the world might assume Nimoy possessed a mind beyond mistake and beyond melding. For a half-century - since the premiere of the classic space fantasy Star Trek on NBC in 1966 - the actor was informally regarded (and greatly loved) as one of the most rational beings on the planet, and maybe in the galaxy. If mankind were to evolve further, Nimoy, »

- Tom Gliatto, @gliattoT

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Leonard Nimoy: 1931-2015

27 February 2015 11:13 AM, PST | IMDb News

Leonard Nimoy, the eloquent, baritone-voiced actor and director who will forever be remembered as the Starship Enterprise's supremely logical half-human, half-Vulcan science officer Spock, died on Friday in Los Angeles. He was 83 years old.

Although his most recent major television role was on Fox's "Fringe," Nimoy's work on the television series "Star Trek" led to Spock becoming one of the most beloved sci-fi characters in the history of the genre. It also earned him three Emmy nominations for the role. Today Spock's V-shaped Vulcan hand salute, accompanied by the gentle benediction, "Live long and prosper," is recognized around the world. The "Star Trek" franchise may have defined the better part of Nimoy's career and made him a pop culture icon, but the man was as versatile as he was famous. He authored a number of books, recorded several albums, directed television episodes and theatrical releases (including the 1987 comedy blockbuster 3 Men and a Baby) and won critical notice as a respected photographer over the course of his lifetime.

Born in Boston on March 26, 1931, to Yiddish-speaking Orthodox Jewish immigrants from Ukraine, Nimoy began acting in community theater at the age of eight. His first major role came at age 17, when he played Ralphie in an amateur production of Clifford Odets's "Awake and Sing." After receiving career advice from an actor in another Odets play making its pre-Broadway debut in Boston, he submitted an application to California's Pasadena Playhouse. Nimoy would then relocate to the West Coast using his earnings from selling vacuum cleaners.

Nimoy made his film debut at age 20 in the 1951 film Queen for a Day, and won a small role as a ballplayer in the film Rhubarb, which was released in the same year. His first movie lead was the title role in the 1952 film Kid Monk Baroni. Nimoy then took drama classes at Boston College in 1953.

Following a stint in the Army between 1953 and 1955, Nimoy had guest starring roles in a number of television series. Starting in 1958, he appeared in "Sea Hunt," "Highway Patrol," "Bonanza," "The Untouchables," "Get Smart" and "The Virginian." He also guest starred in an episode of "The Twilight Zone" titled "A Quality of Mercy," and would work with his future co-star and friend William Shatner in the "The Project Strigas Affair" episode of "The Man from U.N.C.L.E."

But it was Nimoy's role in a 1964 episode of "The Lieutenant" that caught the eye of a producer and writer named Gene Roddenberry, who cast Nimoy in his new series "Star Trek." Nimoy is the only member of "Star Trek's" main cast to appear in every episode of the series, including the original unaired pilot. Of the famous Vulcan salute, Nimoy once explained that he based it on the way the rabbis in his childhood held their hands while giving blessings. (He also invented the Vulcan nerve pinch when he and the "Trek" writers needed a non-violent means for Spock to overpower an enemy.) The series only ran until 1969, but went on to inspire a movie franchise and four spinoffs. Nimoy co-starred with the rest of the original cast in the first six installments of the theatrical series, starting with "Star Trek: The Motion Picture" in 1979. He also directed the third and fourth "Trek" films, 1984's Star Trek III: The Search for Spock and 1986's Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home. Nimoy returned to play Spock Prime for J.J. Abrams' 2009 resurrection of the theatrical franchise and its sequel, Star Trek: Into Darkness.

After the original "Star Trek's" cancellation, Nimoy joined the cast of "Mission: Impossible" playing The Great Paris, a master of impersonation. The actor stayed with that series until 1971. He enjoyed roles in a number of television movies, eventually earning a best supporting actor Emmy nomination for "A Woman Called Golda" in 1982.

Nimoy did not limit his artistic exploration to stage and screen, however. He authored several books of poetry and two autobiographies, the first being the somewhat-controversial 1977 tome "I Am Not Spock," which examined his self-declared identity crisis brought on by being associated with the character. His second, 1995's "I Am Spock," revealed that he had reached a certain peace with the influence the role had on his life. He also recorded several albums, most of which are considered to be masterpieces of unintentional camp.

Nimoy was an avid photographer, having studied photography at the University of California, Los Angeles, in the 1970s. In 2002 he released a provocative collection of photographs titled "The Shekhina Project," which drew controversy for its depiction of Jewish female nudes. Five years after its publication, Nimoy examined the beauty in plus-sized women for 2007's "The Full Body Project."

Nimoy's final TV role was in "Fringe," in which he played genius scientist and Massive Dynamic CEO William Bell, and his final voice-acting role was for the animated film Zambezia.

The actor also was very active on social media, sharing affirmations and words of wisdom on Twitter accompanied by his sign-off, "LLAP," or "Live Long and Prosper." His final tweet, dated February 22, told his 1.13 million followers, "A life is like a garden. Perfect moments can be had, but not preserved, except in memory. "

Nimoy is survived by his wife, Susan Bay Nimoy, his two children, director Adam Nimoy and Julie Nimoy, from his previous marriage to Sandra Zober, as well as a stepson and several grandchildren. »

- Melanie McFarland

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Leonard Nimoy's Most Memorable TV Moments After Star Trek: Simpsons, Big Bang and More

27 February 2015 11:00 AM, PST | E! Online | See recent E! Online news »

Leonard Nimoy certainly did live long and prosper. The Star Trek star passed away at the age of 83, but he's left us with a wonderful legacy of TV work. In addition to his role as Spock in the original Star Trek series and the subsequent movies, Nimoy had beloved recent roles on The Simpsons, The Big Bang Theory and Fringe. On The Simpsons, Nimoy played himself. He popped up in the fan-favorite "Marge vs. the Monorail" episode from 1993 and helped save Krusty the Klown and was beamed away in the end. A few seasons later in 1997 he returned to narrate The Simpsons and The X-Files crossover episode, "The Springfield Files." On Fringe, Nimoy returned to the world of science fiction and »

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Star Trek: Leonard Nimoy R.I.P.

27 February 2015 10:57 AM, PST | Hollywoodnews.com | See recent Hollywoodnews.com news »

Leonard Simon Nimoy (March 26, 1931 – February 27, 2015) was an American actor, film director, poet, singer and photographer. Nimoy was best known for his role as Spock in the original Star Trek series (1966–69), and in multiple film, television and video game sequels. Note: Leonard Nimoy quit smoking 30 years prior to being diagnosed with Copd. If you smoke, don’t. Just quit. Today! Nimoy began his career in his early twenties, teaching acting classes in Hollywood and making minor film and television appearances through the 1950s, as well as playing the title role in Kid Monk Baroni. Foreshadowing his fame as a semi-alien, he played Narab, one of three Martian invaders in the 1952 movie serial Zombies of the Stratosphere. In 1953, he served in the United States Army. In 1965, he made his first appearance in the rejected Star Trek pilot, The Cage, and went on to play the character of Mr Spock until 1969, followed by »

- HollywoodNews.com

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World Mourns The Passing Of Star Trek Icon Leonard Nimoy

27 February 2015 10:42 AM, PST | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

“Live Long and Prosper,” Mr. Spock.

Sad new today, fellow Movie Geeks. Star Trek legend, Leonard Nimoy has sadly passed away. Nimoy’s son, Adam Nimoy, said the actor died Friday of end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at his Los Angeles home. He was 83.

We are deeply saddened to report the passing of Leonard Nimoy. He died this morning at the age of 83 #Llap pic.twitter.com/M5994t9HIL

Star Trek (@StarTrek) February 27, 2015

After “Star Trek” ended, the actor immediately joined the hit adventure series “Mission Impossible” as Paris, the mission team’s master of disguises.

From 1976 to 1982 he hosted the syndicated TV series “In Search of … ” which attempted to probe such mysteries as the legend of the Loch Ness Monster and the disappearance of aviator Amelia Earhart.

He played Israeli leader Golda Meir’s husband opposite Ingrid Bergman in the TV drama “A Woman Called Golda” and Vincent van Gogh in “Vincent, »

- Movie Geeks

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Star Trek's Leonard Nimoy 1931-2015: Acting icon's life in pictures

27 February 2015 10:35 AM, PST | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Star Trek's Leonard Nimoy, who has passed away aged 83, established himself as an icon of pop culture in a career that spanned from the early 1950s through the 2010s.

While he will be forever linked with the role of the intensely logical Vulcan Mr Spock in Star Trek, Nimoy was also an accomplished musician, writer, director and photographer.

The four-time Emmy nominee reached a whole new generation of fans with his role as Dr William Bell in Fringe in the 2000s and later reprised his role as Spock in Jj Abrams's hugely successful rebooted Star Trek film series.

Star Trek actor Leonard Nimoy dies: Tribute paid to sci-fi icon

We look back at Leonard Nimoy's life and career in pictures below: »

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Leonard Nimoy Has Passed Away

27 February 2015 10:26 AM, PST | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

We’re sad to report that Leonard Nimoy has passed away at the age of 83.

The New York Times reports via Susan Bay Nimoy, Leonard's wife, that the prolific actor passed away this morning of end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Nimoy is best remembered for playing Spock on Gene Roddenberry's Star Trek TV series from 1966 – 1969, reprising the role in Star Trek: The Animated Series and eight Star Trek movies, most recently in 2013's Star Trek Into Darkness. His acting career touched seven decades, beginning in 1951 and including roles in many memorable shows and films, including Mission: Impossible, Fringe, The Outer Limits, Night Gallery, The Brain EatersThe Man from U.N.C.L.E., Gunsmoke, and The Twilight Zone.

Nimoy also displayed admirable skills behind the camera, directing Star Trek III: The Search for Spock, Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home, 3 Men and a Baby, one episode of Night Gallery, and much more. »

- Derek Anderson

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Leonard Nimoy of Star Trek & Fringe Dead at 83

27 February 2015 10:22 AM, PST | Film-Book | See recent Film-Book news »

  Leonard Nimoy has Died. Leonard Nimoy has died at the age of 83. The cause of his death, reported by his wife, Susan Bay Nimoy, was end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. I had heard that Leonard Nimoy was recently in the hospital but I had no idea that it was serious. Perhaps that is [...]

Continue reading: Leonard Nimoy of Star Trek & Fringe Dead at 83 »

- Rollo Tomasi

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And don't forget 'Fringe' in your Leonard Nimoy tributes

27 February 2015 10:16 AM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Leonard Nimoy will always be remembered for "Star Trek" and that's entirely appropriate, because Spock is one of the iconic characters in television history.  But I've already done one post reminding people that Leonard Nimoy also directed the top-grossing movie of 1987.  So don't exclude that from your tributes. And also don't forget "Fringe," which offered Nimoy one of his last major roles, playing the brilliant William Bell, colleague to John Noble's Walter Bishop. Bell maybe only appeared in a handful of episodes, including a voice-cameo in the show's trippy animated episode, but once the oft-discussed role became associated with Nimoy, his presence infused the rest of the series. Once you had him there once, you never really needed to have him there again on "Fringe" because knowing that William Bell was Leonard Freaking Nimoy meant that you knew William Bell was a force. Simply put, it was a flawless »

- Daniel Fienberg

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Star Trek actor Leonard Nimoy dies: Tribute paid to sci-fi icon

27 February 2015 9:59 AM, PST | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Science fiction fans around the world are in mourning following the sad news that Star Trek icon Leonard Nimoy has died today (February 27) at the age of 83.

Nimoy was checked into UCLA Medical Centre in Los Angeles earlier in the week, one year after announcing that he was battling lung disease.

We gather tributes from the many fans and friends who were inspired by Star Trek's Mr Spock below:

"I loved him like a brother. We will all miss his humour, his talent, and his capacity to love."

-William Shatner http://t.co/U8ZN98tVYp

William Shatner (@WilliamShatner) February 27, 2015

Post by George Takei.

My friend and colleague Leonard Nimoy passed today. A true legend, and a wonderful human being. Sadly missed.

— john noble (@thejohnnoble) February 27, 2015

Rip Leonard Nimoy. So many of us at Nasa were inspired by Star Trek. Boldly go... http://t.co/qpeH5BTzQc pic. »

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R.I.P. Leonard Nimoy (1931-2015)

27 February 2015 9:45 AM, PST | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

The New York Times is this evening reporting the very sad news that Star Trek actor Leonard Nimoy has died at the age of 83.

Most famously remembered for his role as Spock in the original Star Trek television show and subsequent movie franchise, Nimoy was admitted to hospital yesterday falling ill. His wife, Susan Bay Nimoy, confirmed his passing after he had been battling with end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease which he had announced last year – a disease he had attributed to his years of smoking, which he had given up almost thirty years ago.

Nimoy returned to the Star Trek universe most recently in J.J. Abrams’ franchise reboot Star Trek and its sequel Star Trek Into Darkness, and has also recently featured in TV’s The Big Bang Theory and Fringe and lending his voice to Transformers: Dark of the Moon. He also directed several movies, including Star Trek III: The Search for Spock, »

- Scott J. Davis

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007

1-20 of 58 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


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