Mad Men (2007–2015)
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Six Month Leave 

Don checks in to a hotel after his separation from Betty. Back at the office, he is forced to get rid of Freddy against his will because of his drinking problem.

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(created by), (as Andre Jacquemetton) | 2 more credits »
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Storyline

Marilyn Monroe has just passed away, and Joan and many of the women in the office are feeling the loss of a person with who they could identify. Betty and Don are still on bad terms with each other, and don't have all the answers in how to deal with their situation publicly. The ball is basically in Betty's court on the next step. She takes some solace in her horseback riding in the company of Arthur Case, but privately she is still not taking her problems with Don very well. Don finally confides at least to Roger and Jane about the fact that he is no longer at home, the information which creates some unexpected issues with others. On other office fronts, Freddy embarrasses himself just before a presentation to clients, this embarrassment a manifestation of over-drinking. He is lucky that this embarrassment did not happen in front of the clients. Because of this issue, Roger and Duck feel that Freddy should take an extended leave of absence, effectively meaning that he should be fired... Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

TV-14 | See all certifications »
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Release Date:

28 September 2008 (USA)  »

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1.78 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The boxer in the bar is Floyd Patterson. At the time Patterson was the heavyweight champion. He would lose the title to Sonny Liston a month later in September of 1962. See more »

Goofs

As the pool secretaries react to the death of Marilyn Monroe, which happened the day before, Jane tells Draper that Sally called the office last night asking about him. Last night would have been Sunday, 5 August, when the office was closed. See more »

Quotes

Peggy Olson: You just don't imagine her ever being alone. She was so famous.
Hollis: Some people just hide in plain sight.
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Connections

References Gypsy (1962) See more »

Soundtracks

I'm Through With Love
(uncredited)
by Gus Kahn, Matty Malneck, Jay Livingston
Performed by Marilyn Monroe
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User Reviews

 
The Best Episode of the Season So Far
5 August 2016 | by See all my reviews

It ends up being the runner-up; "Meditations in an Emergency" beats it.

I liked Freddy. I think everyone liked Freddy. He was endearing. Everyone at the agency seemed to be so cynical and caustic, but Freddy was light-hearted and friendly. And that's why it was so important that he leave Sterling Cooper. And what strikes me the most is the grace with which he departs.

To be honest, at this point in the show, I'm not sure what the overlying story is. Most television shows definitely have one. For "Breaking Bad" it was turning a good guy into a bad guy. For "Friends," it was about the quest for a soulmate. What is it in "Mad Men?" Is it the search for peace? Making everything okay? Is it really about Don, or is it about Peggy, and her potential rise to the top?

The episode I'm reviewing is premised by the death of Marilyn Monroe. The show has a wonderful way of working history events into it. You never hear about Obama's election in "Breaking Bad," even though it happened during the course of the show. But in "Mad Men," you're occasionally reminded of the world outside Sterling Cooper. Marilyn's death is striking to the viewer because we knew it was going to happen, but we never expected it to actually happen in Mad Men.

There are three major events in this episode: Marilyn's death, Freddy's departure, and Don and Betty's official separation. It's the episode in the season, and every season of every good drama has this, where multiple characters hit rock bottom.

It's excellent television. Even by the superb standards set by "Mad Men."


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