George Waring becomes infatuated with Miss Lowe and his wife divorces him, While driving, Miss Lowe's horse runs away and she is heroically rescued by Dick Watts, a handsome youth who falls... See full summary »
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George Waring becomes infatuated with Miss Lowe and his wife divorces him, While driving, Miss Lowe's horse runs away and she is heroically rescued by Dick Watts, a handsome youth who falls in love with her. Miss Lowe, attired in bridal gown, is about to marry Waring when Watts rushes in and tempestuously exhorts her not to marry Waring, and as she has really learned to love Watts she accedes to his wishes. Waring is furious at having his bride snatched from his hands at the very altar, but resigns himself to his fate. Watts marries Miss Lowe, and, alone, seeks his fortune in Alaska. Meantime Mrs. Waring has met a childhood sweetheart, Paul Durkin, a soldier of fortune and a gambler, marries him and drifts to the Alaskan gold fields. Watts makes a rich strike and prepares to return home, but meets Durkin who fleeces him. He attempts suicide, and is found badly wounded by Mrs. Durkin, who nurses him back to health, and, touched by his story, persuades Durkin to give back the gold and ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Short | Drama

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28 January 1911 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

It is not up to the average of releases
10 November 2015 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

A case of jealousy with a divorce to follow. Later all parties to the transaction meet again in the wilds of Alaska. The story is good, but probably the principal interest in the film will rest with the change in locality. The picturesque elements which are contained in the Alaska picture will afford an occasion of more than ordinary interest and for this reason, perhaps, the film will be considered good. It must be admitted, however, that it is not up to the average of releases of recent date that have come from this company. Mechanically, some of the defects which have hitherto been pointed out have been overcome, but the story admits of no dramatic situations such as are characteristic of a majority of the Reliance films. The actors have done as well as they could under the circumstances, but the opportunity was not there, consequently it was impossible to produce the picture. - The Moving Picture World, February 11, 1911


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