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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

1-20 of 22 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


ICM Partners grows independent group with Kristen Konvitz hire

10 July 2017 12:20 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

New arrival worked at Stay Gold, Wild Bunch, The Weinstein Company

ICM Partners on Monday announced the hire of Kristen Konvitz at the agency’s independent and international film department.

Konvitz, who most recently served as head of production at Stay Gold Features, will be based in the Los Angeles office and reports to department head Jessica Lacy.

At Stay Gold Features, Konvitz was involved in Sundance breakout Patti Cake$ that sold to Fox Searchlight, as well as A24’s upcoming Under The Silver Lake from David Robert Mitchell, and SXSW award winner The Strange Ones.

The hire comes as Lacy’s division enjoys a purple patch, having recently sold Cannes Director’s Fortnight hit The Florida Project to A24, Cory Finley’s Sundance selection Thoroughbred to Focus Features, and Charlie McDowell’s The Discovery to Netflix.

“Our department is in the midst of a banner year, and we want to continue to grow our team with »

- jeremykay67@gmail.com (Jeremy Kay)

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Brad Pitt and Tommy Lee Jones Team for Sci-Fi Drama Ad Astra

24 June 2017 9:48 AM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

His long-gestating sequel World War Z finally back on the right track with David Fincher now confirmed to direct, Brad Pitt has also lined up another project that will shoot first. Brad Pitt has signed on to star alongside Tommy Lee Jones in a new sci-fi thriller called Ad Astra, which is Latin for "to the stars." Production is already slated to begin this coming September, with director James Grey at the helm. The filmmaker is comig off his recent film The Lost City of Z, which debuted in theaters this spring.

Deadline reports that Brad Pitt will portray Roy McBride, a "slightly autistic" space engineer, whose father disappeared 20 years ago after embarking on a one-way mission to Neptune, to find signs of intelligent life. Roy sets off on a mission of his own into outer space to find out why his father's mission failed. Tommmy Lee Jones will play the father, »

- MovieWeb

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It was Brad Pitt who invited...

2 May 2017 10:08 PM, PDT | Behindwoods | See recent Behindwoods news »

Produced by Brad Pitt's production house Plan B, The Lost City of Z is based on author David Grann's nonfiction bestseller by the same name. The film is about the incredible true story of British explorer Percy Fawcett's adventures in the Amazon.

 

Starring Sienna Miller (of the American Snipper and G.IJoe: The rise of Cobra fame), Robert Pattinson (of the Twilight Saga fame) and Charlie Hunnam (of the Pacific Rim fame and who'll be soon seen in King Arthur: Legend of the Sword), the film is directed by James Gray (of The Yards and Two Lovers fame)

 

It »

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The Lost City of Z movie review: archaeology was his religion

18 April 2017 2:26 PM, PDT | www.flickfilosopher.com | See recent FlickFilosopher news »

MaryAnn’s quick take… An adventure of the intellect and of the heart with the real-life explorer who inspired Indiana Jones, one more about the journey than the destination. I’m “biast” (pro): love a good adventure; love director James Gray

I’m “biast” (con): nothing

I have not read the source material

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto)

He was a real-life Indiana Jones. Literally: the Harrison Ford character was based on British explorer Percy Fawcett, one of the last of those intrepid men (always men, of course) to boldly venture into uncharted (by white people, that is) territory in search of knowledge, and to fill in the blank spaces on the maps. A cartographer and archaeologist, he was obsessed with the idea that remnants of a lost dead civilization were hidden in the Amazonian jungles, and he disappeared — along with his traveling companion, »

- MaryAnn Johanson

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James Gray on the Financial Realities of Independent Filmmaking: ‘I Am Struggling Financially’

16 April 2017 11:02 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

James Gray is back in theaters with “The Lost City of Z,” a film at once markedly different from and right at home among the rest of his distinguished body of work. The “We Own the Night,” “Two Lovers” and “The Immigrant” director has spoken with Vulture about the financial realities of independent filmmaking, offering a number of candid — and sobering — statements: “You know, people assume that because I’m a director, I make tons of money. I am struggling financially,” he said.

Read More: How Can Middle-Class Filmmakers Make a Living?

“Now, I’m very lucky I get to do what it is I want to do,” Gray continued. “I’ve made, good or bad, very uncompromising movies, the movies exactly that I wanted to make, and that’s a beautiful gift, so I’m not complaining about that. But I struggle. I have a hard time paying my bills. »

- Michael Nordine

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Why Brad Pitt Sent James Gray ‘The Lost City of Z’ And Pushed the Filmmaker In a New Direction — Podcast

14 April 2017 7:37 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

After James Gray finished reading David Grann’s book “The Lost City of Z: A Tale of Deadly Obsession in the Amazon” – a nonfiction chronicle of British explorer Percy Fawcett’s obsessive quest to find a lost civilization buried deep in the Amazonian jungle – he was confused why Brad Pitt had sent it to him.

“I have absolutely no idea what they want me to do this,” said Gray when he was guest on IndieWire’s Filmmaker Toolkit podcast. “There had been nothing in my career as a director that had shown I could do anything like this.”

Paramount had bought the book for Pitt , whose production company Plan B (“Moonlight,” “12 Years a Slave”) ultimately produced the film. Pitt had always wanted to work with Gray, and while it didn’t happen this time, Pitt will star in Gray’s Sci Fi film “Ad Astra,” which is shooting this summer. »

- Chris O'Falt

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James Gray on the Wistfulness of ‘The Lost City of Z,’ Twitter Mishaps, and Stealing from the Best

12 April 2017 11:21 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Read even just a couple of interviews with him and you’ll realize that James Gray — in his humor, candor, self-effacement, knowledge, and general kindness — is better at the process than almost anybody else. So I’d experienced twice over, and now a third time on the occasion of his latest picture, The Lost City of Z. Although I liked the film a whole lot upon seeing it at last year’s Nyff and found it a rich source of questions, our conversation proved too casual and genial to be intruded about with a query about sound mixing — which I, of course, just knew I’d ask before entering a hotel room and sitting at a tiny table, complementary chocolate cake between us, and realizing that my muse then and there was instead a question about Steven Soderbergh’s Twitter account.

It’s not every day you can bring it up, »

- Nick Newman

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'The Lost City of Z' Review: Charlie Hunnam Hunts for His Heart of Darkness

11 April 2017 12:48 PM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

James Gray makes films like an explorer, digging for the details that define character and art. The Lost City of Z doesn't look like Gray's other movies. Little Odessa, The Yards, We Own the Night, Two Lovers and The Immigrant mostly investigated the corners of his native New York. The Lost City of Z, set in Ireland, England and the Amazonian jungle at the start of the 20th Century, takes the Russian-Jewish Gray out of his comfort zone. His skilled screenplay, adapted from the 2009 book by David Gann, tells the story of Col. »

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Movie Review – The Lost City Of Z (2016)

20 March 2017 9:45 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

The Lost City Of Z, 2016.

Directed by James Gray.

Starring Charlie Hunnam, Tom Holland, Sienna Miller, Robert Pattinson, and Angus Macfadyen.

Synopsis:

The true-life story of early 20th century soldier-turned-explorer Percy Fawcett who discovered signs of an early civilisation in the Amazon basin.  After serving in World War I, he made a final expedition, along with his teenage son, convinced that he would at long last find both the location and the proof he’d been searching for.

Think of a director who could make an epic movie, and somewhere at the foot of the list would be James Gray.  Films like The Yards (2000) and Two Lovers (2008) earned him Palme D’Or nominations that didn’t translate into box office.  The Immigrant (2013) fared even worse: not only was its distribution severely limited in America, it didn’t even make it into UK cinemas.  Now, after working on essentially the fringes »

- Freda Cooper

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Interview: Director James Gray on The Lost City of Z

16 March 2017 4:51 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Author: Jon Lyus

We’re huge fans of James Gray’s work on HeyUGuys. His work on films such as We Own the Night, Two Lovers and 2013’s under-seen (but often on Netflix) classic The Immigrant are stirring works of an assured cinematic hand. Next week his latest film, The Lost City of Z, arrives in UK cinemas, and is well worth your time.

The film tells the story, so vividly brought to life in David Grann’s 2009 bestseller, subtitled: A Tale of Deadly Obsession in the Amazon, of explorer Percy Fawcett. His journeys deep into the Amazon to uncover the secrets of a lost civilization were followed intently at the time, making his disappearance in 1925 of the most enduring mysteries of the 20th century.

The Lost City of Z

With The Lost City of Z Gray has brought together a fine cast including new Spider-Man Tom Holland as the »

- Jon Lyus

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Jackie,’ ’45 Years,’ ‘One More Time With Feeling,’ and More

7 March 2017 7:20 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

45 Years (Andrew Haigh)

Andrew Haigh’s third feature as a director, 45 Years, is an excellent companion piece to its 2011 predecessor, Weekend. The latter examined the inception of a potential relationship between two men over the course of a weekend, whereas its successor considers the opposite extreme. Again sticking to a tight timeframe, the film chronicles the six days leading up to a couple’s 45th wedding anniversary. Though highly accomplished, Weekend nevertheless suffered from a tendency towards commenting »

- The Film Stage

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James Gray Explains Why Cannes Palme d’Or Winners Are Often “Incredibly Boring To Watch”

6 March 2017 6:45 AM, PST | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

We’re couple of months away from the world’s most prestigious (and sometimes gaudiest) movie event, the Cannes Film Festival. It’s where the creme de la creme of global cinema is served on the lushest of red carpets, and plenty of Very Important Films are either feted with laurels or heartily booed. However, one favorite of the Croisette, James Gray — who’s had four of his films screen including “The Yards,” “We Own The Night,” “Two Lovers,” and “The Immigrant” — sees something troubling in the kinds of movies that are generally celebrated in the south of France each year.

Continue reading James Gray Explains Why Cannes Palme d’Or Winners Are Often “Incredibly Boring To Watch” at The Playlist. »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Before’ Trilogy, ‘Moonlight,’ ‘Kate Plays Christine,’ ‘Allied,’ and More

28 February 2017 6:12 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Allied (Robert Zemeckis)

That thing we can’t take for granted: a film whose many parts – period piece, war picture, blood-spattered actioner, deception-fueled espionage thriller, sexy romance, and, at certain turns, comedy – can gracefully move in conjunction and separate from each other, just as its labyrinthine-but-not-quite plot jumps from one setpiece to the next with little trouble in maintaining a consistency of overall pleasure. Another late-career triumph for Robert Zemeckis, and one of the year’s few truly great American movies. »

- The Film Stage

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Manchester by the Sea,’ ‘Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown,’ and More

21 February 2017 7:44 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Fireworks Wednesday (Asghar Farhadi)

After a festival tour back in 2006, Asghar Farhadi’s Fireworks Wednesday was theatrically re-released by the newly established Grasshopper Films, and now it’s arriving on DVD. The drama is another precisely calibrated, culturally specific demonstration of Farhadi’s skills in constructing empathy machines. Further in line with the director’s filmography, this story has a nesting-doll structure that combines ingrained social hierarchies, domestic drama, and a tragic intersection of misunderstandings. And while it »

- The Film Stage

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Premiere Interviews: The Lost City of Z – Charlie Hunnam, Tom Holland & James Gray

16 February 2017 3:07 PM, PST | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Author: Jon Lyus

Director James Gray has made a number of superlative films. Films such as We Own the Night, Two Lovers and 2013’s under-seen classic The Immigrant each have Gray’s trademark of a startlingly assured hand. His latest film, which had its European premiere in London this evening, is another exploration of human identity albeit in a far more adventurous form.

The premiere Of The Lost City Of Z was held at The British Museum in London and was attended by actors Charlie Hunnam, Sienna Miller, Robert Pattinson, Tom Holland, Edward Ashley, Harry Melling, Tom Mulheron, and director James Gray.

The Lost City of Z

That’s quite a cast, and with cinematographer Darius Khondji (who created some of this writer’s most cherished images in The City of Lost Children) audiences are in for a treat.

Colin Hart and Scott Davis were on the red carpet this »

- Jon Lyus

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Arrival,’ ‘The Edge of Seventeen,’ ‘The Tree of Wooden Clogs’ & More

14 February 2017 6:50 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Arrival (Denis Villeneuve)

Within the alien subgenre, there lies another. Therein, knowledge is treasure and the fifth dimension is love. The major rule: once the mystery and the chills have subsided, the revelations are enlightening and the welcomes warm. Thankfully, Denis Villeneuve‘s Arrival is more worthwhile than that. The film juggles a bit of world-building with meaty, compelling characters while trying to make linguistics look cool. No easy task, but the film does so in a breeze »

- The Film Stage

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Cameraperson,’ ‘Loving,’ ‘The Lobster,’ and More

7 February 2017 1:06 PM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Cameraperson (Kirsten Johnson)

A travelogue through one artist’s subconscious, Cameraperson is perhaps the most plural film of 2016 – a formal, tonal, situational, and pacing exercise that lulls viewers into thinking it’s set on one thing before turning towards seemingly new territory. And it never feels out-of-balance because director Kirsten Johnson has, by building this film around moments that “marked” her, granted such an intimate experience that it almost feels wrong to intellectualize much of anything that’s going on here, »

- The Film Stage

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Lost City of Z Trailer Has Charlie Hunnam in Search of the Unknown

2 February 2017 7:26 PM, PST | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

Amazon Studios has released a new full-length trailer for their upcoming adaptation The Lost City of Z, which boasts a stellar cast including Charlie Hunnam, Robert Pattinson, Sienna Miller and even the new Spider-Man himself, Tom Holland. This project has been in the works for several years now, with Brad Pitt once in talks to star and Benedict Cumberbatch also circling the project before they both dropped out. Brad Pitt does remain on board as an executive producer, through his Plan B Films company.

Based on author David Grann's nonfiction bestseller, The Lost City of Z tells the incredible true story of British explorer Percy Fawcett (Charlie Hunnam), who journeys into the Amazon at the dawn of the 20th century and discovers evidence of a previously unknown, advanced civilization that may have once inhabited the region. Despite being ridiculed by the scientific establishment who regard indigenous populations as "savages, »

- MovieWeb

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Welcome to the Jungle in New Trailer and Posters for James Gray’s ‘The Lost City of Z’

2 February 2017 8:05 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

“Here was a person for whom the search meant everything,” James Gray tells National Geographic, speaking about British explorer Percy Fawcett, played by Charlie Hunnam in The Lost City of Z. “His dream of finding an ancient Amazonian civilization sustained him through unimaginable hardships, the skepticism of the scientific community, startling betrayals and years spent away from his family.” This is all captured in his latest feature, one of our early favorites of the year.

Also starring Robert Pattinson, Tom Holland, and Sienna Miller, ahead of an April release, Bleecker Street and Amazon Studios have now unveiled a new U.S. trailer for the film (which was recently cut down to a PG-13 rating, albeit in a minor fashion). For those who missed the 35mm premiere at last year’s New York Film Festival, thankfully Metrograph has unveiled they’ll be showing the film in the format this April, along with a full Gray retrospective. »

- Jordan Raup

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘The Watermelon Woman,’ ‘Carol,’ ‘The Reflektor Tapes,’ and More

31 January 2017 9:17 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Arcade Fire: The Reflektor Tapes (Kahlil Joseph)

A list of things The Reflektor Tapes comes close to being but doesn’t quite end up as: a concert film stitching together Arcade Fire‘s work on a worldwide tour supporting their most recent album, Reflektor; a travelogue of said tour; a sense-memory visual essay tracing the years-long life of songs, tracing from hashing-out and recording to a presentation for thousands of screaming, jumping fans; a channel-futzing sonic exploration »

- The Film Stage

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

1-20 of 22 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


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