IMDb > Encounters at the End of the World (2007)
Encounters at the End of the World
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Encounters at the End of the World (2007) More at IMDbPro »

Photos (See all 10 | slideshow) Videos (see all 3)
Encounters at the End of the World -- This is the theatrical trailer for Encounters at the End of the World: Theatrical Trailer, Werner Herzog's documentary on life in Antarctica.
Encounters at the End of the World -- Discussion about hole-diving in Antarctica.

Overview

User Rating:
7.8/10   11,191 votes »
Your Rating:
Saving vote...
Deleting vote...
/10   (delete | history)
Sorry, there was a problem
MOVIEmeter: ?
Up 8% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writer:
Werner Herzog (written by)
Contact:
View company contact information for Encounters at the End of the World on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
17 October 2008 (Spain) See more »
Genre:
Plot:
Film-maker Werner Herzog travels to the McMurdo Station in Antarctica, looking to capture the continent's beauty and investigate the characters living there. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Awards:
Nominated for Oscar. Another 3 wins & 8 nominations See more »
User Reviews:
Dear Future Aliens: This is why we've left you a fish See more (60 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order)

Werner Herzog ... Narrator
Scott Rowland ... Himself - Transportation Dept.
Stefan Pashov ... Himself - Philosopher, Forklift Driver
Doug MacAyeal ... Himself - Glaciologist (as Douglas MacAyeal)
Ryan Andrew Evans ... Himself - Filmmaker, Cook (as Ryan A. Evans)
Kevin Emery ... Himself - Survival School Instructor
Olav T. Oftedal ... Himself - Nutritional Ecologist
Regina Eisert ... Herself - Physiologist
David R. Pacheco Jr. ... Himself - Journeyman Plumber
Samuel S. Bowser ... Himself - Cell Biologist
Jan Pawlowski ... Himself - Zoologist
William Jirsa ... Himself - Linguist, Computer Expert
Karen Joyce ... Herself - Traveler, Computer Expert
Libor Zicha ... Himself - Utility Mechanic
Ashrita Furman ... Himself - Multiple World Record Holder
David Ainley ... Himself - Marine Ecologist
William McIntosh ... Himself - Volcanologist, Geochronologist
Clive Oppenheimer ... Himself - Volcanologist
Peter Gorham ... Himself - Physicist
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Ernest Shackleton ... Himself (archive footage)

Shaun Phillip Cantwell ... General Assistant (uncredited)
Create a character page for: ?

Directed by
Werner Herzog 
 
Writing credits
Werner Herzog (written by)

Produced by
Randall M. Boyd .... supervising producer
Phil Fairclough .... executive producer
Dave Harding .... executive producer (as David S. Harding)
Julian Hobbs .... executive producer
Henry Kaiser .... producer
Andrea Meditch .... executive producer
Erik Nelson .... executive producer
Tree Wright .... associate producer (as Tree Leyburn)
 
Original Music by
Henry Kaiser 
David Lindley 
 
Cinematography by
Peter Zeitlinger 
 
Film Editing by
Joe Bini 
 
Production Management
Jessica DeJong .... production manager
Jane Root .... executive in charge of production
 
Art Department
Douglas Martin .... motion graphics
Bruce McCall .... original artwork
 
Sound Department
Stephen Hart .... recording engineer
Werner Herzog .... sound
Michael Klinger .... post-production mixer
Josh Michael .... recording assistant
Robert Noone .... location sound
Michael Paul .... location sound
Douglas Quin .... sound designer
D.D. Stenehjem .... sound designer
 
Visual Effects by
Christopher Dusendschon .... digital imaging supervisor: iO FILM
Iain Marcks .... digital imaging technician: iO FILM (as Iain Stasukevich)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
James Creevy .... grip
Jane Gray .... grip
Henry Kaiser .... underwater photographer
 
Editorial Department
Danica Barnes .... on-line editor
Bartholomew Burcham .... assistant editor
Herrianne Cayabyab .... assistant on-line editor
Ryan Delk .... first assistant editor
Colin Hatton .... post-production coordinator
Brian Hutchings .... colorist: Alpha Dogs, Inc.
David W. Ryan .... assistant editor (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Jen Baker .... musician
Joe Bini .... music editor
Danielle DeGruttola .... musician
Stephen Hart .... score mixer
Stephen Hart .... score recording engineer
Henry Kaiser .... music producer
Cheryl Leonard .... musician
David Lindley .... music editor
Damon Smith .... musician
William Winant .... musician
 
Other crew
Paul De Cham .... post facilities manager
Ryan Andrew Evans .... production assistant (as Ryan Evans)
Jason Farrell .... supplier: video equipment
Patricia Jackson .... location manager
Lola Mitchell .... production coordinator
Jane Priester .... production coordinator
Cynthia Shapiro .... business affairs
Robert Smits .... supplier: video equipment
 
Thanks
Lloyd Austin .... thanks
Samuel S. Bowser .... thanks (as Samuel Bowser)
Ed Brawley .... thanks
Steve Clabuesch .... thanks
Dug Coons .... thanks
Art Devries .... thanks
Roger Ebert .... dedicatee
Guy Guthridge .... thanks
Kevin Hoefling .... thanks
Elaine Hood .... thanks
David T. Huang .... thanks (as David T. Huang)
Philip Kyle .... thanks
Greg Prian .... thanks
Rob Robbins .... thanks
Kim Stanley Robinson .... thanks
Kim Silverman .... thanks
 

Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies
Create a character page for: ?

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
99 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Aspect Ratio:
1.85 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:
Australia:G | Canada:G (Alberta/British Columbia/Manitoba/Ontario/Québec) | Netherlands:6 | Singapore:G | UK:U | USA:G
Filming Locations:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Werner Herzog has disclosed that the scene of scientists putting their ears to the ice to listen to seal calls was entirely staged. Herzog asked them to position themselves according to his directions, and the sounds were previously recorded through underwater microphones by sound artist Douglas Quin.See more »
Quotes:
[last lines]
Stefan Pashov:There is a beautiful saying by an American philosopher, Alan Watts. He used to say that through our eyes the universe is perceiving itself, and through our ears the universe is listening to its cosmic harmonies. And we are the witness to which the universe becomes conscious of its glory, of its magnificence.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Edited from Them! (1954)See more »
Soundtrack:
Retche Gospod Gospodevi MoyemuSee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
26 out of 34 people found the following review useful.
Dear Future Aliens: This is why we've left you a fish, 18 November 2008
Author: revival05 from Sweden

The world ends at Antarctica, at least geographically - there's nothing further south - and quite possibly in a greater sense. Werner Herzog has gone there to make a film, catching the opportunity to capture some of it's beauty in a way rarely seen on film, and also to share some of his thoughts about nature and humanity. In and around the large McMurdo Research Station he circulates the various people working there, joins them on their fieldwork and interviews them, all resulting in a blend of beautiful images, personal micro-stories, funny sidetracks, well paced informative moments and an often fascinating look at nature's inexplicable mystery, humanity's as well as Mother Earth's.

This is a large canvas, perhaps slightly difficult to put in proper words. Above all, all of the ideas and thoughts within the movie stems largely from the viewer's own imagination, Herzog is merely - with his warm and serious, yet inexplicable witty, narration - planting the mental seeds and asking the questions, some rhetorical and some forever impossible to answer. And it is remarkable how he does this, how this film is designed. All throughout, Herzog moves about like a genuine tourist and at the beginning I am surprised how spontaneous the whole idea feels, almost as if I am actually watching a private home video made for personal remembrance. The only difference being of course, that it would be the kind of home video Herzog would make. And be that as it may, this is still a great movie, because it continues from this elementary first stage of how he travels to the station, combined with stock footage of the explorers of the 1800s, into that of a true thinker's exploration in a romantic setting. The form of the film gradually evolves, first small steps with the reality of the small, modern society that has been developed, the paradox of a restaurant with a beloved ice-cream machine (needless to point out further, and despised by Herzog), and with a scene of people having an unusual way of training, in case they would get lost in a blizzard. From then on, at least I was hooked and from these minor steps of humanity looking itself, if but slightly, in the mirror, the movie blossoms into a greater and greater abyss of questions that human beings will always feel the hunger to answer, questions they never will be able to answer but questions that human beings will always need to have.

Human beings, now there's another thing. Herzog encounters a lot of inhabitants of the station and gets to know them, and while not to say that there aren't interesting people throughout the movie, but here we have the adventurous woman who has her own party trick where she amuses people by becoming luggage. She has many stories to tell, like how she hitch-hiked from USA to Africa in a sewer pipe. Another man claims he once survived getting killed by the mayans . There are others with less dramatic things to say. Like one of the biologist divers, slightly sad since he's decided that at that very day he will perform his last dive. He feels like his job is done. Another man is simply showing how he has two fingers of the same length, which would prove that he's got Aztec blood in his veins. Or so they say.

You might understand what I'm getting at. In these very sequences of utter realism, we do get to feel the fresh air of a normal day out at the Antarctica. And it helps settle the notion that this is a film about humanity. We are constantly in the real world, with real people, in contrast to Grizzly Man (2005), Herzog's previous nature documentary, where we were indeed surrounded by breathtaking nature, but we were also viewing the Timothy Treadwell show, put on by the star persona of himself, if there ever were another. Here we meet the actual answer to Treadwell's love to nature. Science, philosophy, mere being in the never ending light over the ices. Herzog seems very much in love with nature, be it ice skies underneath the surface, or active, thundering volcanoes or just the remarkable penguin scene that could break your heart (even Herzog could not resist one of those sentimental scenes directed by nature, despite even claiming early on that this is "not a penguin film"). It may be penguins, but it's hauntingly beautiful nonetheless.

Throughout the movie, Herzog keeps expanding his view on nature and humanity until we reach the end, and the topic we've all been waiting for. The climate change. As you'd expect though Encounters at the End of the World is by no means a propaganda film, it would obviously be beneath Herzog's dignity. No, it seems like Herzog quietly accepts that mankind might be headed for doom - it's as natural as the deranged penguins leaving it's flock to never return - and instead asks what alien lifeforms might think of our remains if they would land to explore in thousands of years. Yes, the explorations goes on. And I think it is importance to remember that the end of the world is not the end of the world. Mother Earth will be alright. She has all the time in the universe. Makind however, we may be getting near the end. I can't help but feel, when I see the colossal, wide, arctic images and the spreading cancerstain of urbanism, that after all mankind has done, Mother Earth deserves to be left alone for a while. There has to be some peace and quiet in the Universe. If the aliens do land, and they do study our hideouts, and they do feel confused over finding a fish deep down in a tunnel in the Antarctica; I'd suggest they'd watch Encounters at the End of the World.

Was the above review useful to you?
See more (60 total) »

Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for Encounters at the End of the World (2007)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
Adventurous Penguin resistance_boy
Annoying Musical Interludes dlmiley
A Rambling movie without direction in need of editing, wait for DVD pezzhull
Human Extinction? rip_strike
Languages dying out clive-ihd
What happened to David Pacheco? stevsmit
See more »

Recommendations

If you enjoyed this title, our database also recommends:
- - - - -
King of the Rocket Men Religulous The Day After Tomorrow An Inconvenient Truth 2012
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
Show more recommendations

Related Links

Full cast and crew Company credits External reviews
News articles IMDb Documentary section IMDb USA section

You may report errors and omissions on this page to the IMDb database managers. They will be examined and if approved will be included in a future update. Clicking the 'Edit page' button will take you through a step-by-step process.