A grandmother saves up her pennies and goes on a tour of TV studio, and her dream of interacting with show business personalities comes true!

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Cast

Credited cast:
Ben Blue ...
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Himself (as Rosey Grier)
Dora Hall ...
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Oliver ...
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A grandmother saves up her pennies and goes on a tour of TV studio, and her dream of interacting with show business personalities comes true!

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30 January 1972 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Trivia

This show and its companions, "The Toy Pony" (1974), "Rose on Broadway" (1978), and "Imagine That" (1979) were vanity projects financed by Dora Hall's husband Leo Hulseman, the founder and president of the disposable cup manufacturer, Solo Cup Co. The programs were syndicated as TV "specials" and designed to showcase Hall's virtuosity as an entertainer. In "Once Upon a Tour" and "Rose on Broadway," for example, Dora Hall - a grandmother in her 70's with limited show business experience - sings, dances, and swaps jokes with her celebrity guests. The specials were a spin-off from the vanity sound recordings waxed by Dora Hall in the 1960s and distributed free (through mail-in offers) along with the cups and paper plates Solo Cup manufactured. See more »

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So awful it might be worth watching
10 January 2010 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

This vanity project for the wife of the owner of Solo Cup was just screened in LA as part of a Frank Sinatra, Jr. tribute. Jr. is the only person in this who isn't completely embarrassing, though the songs he has to do are pretty bad.

The host, Dora Hall, is a 70 year old grandma with little entertainment experience, and she's not even the worst singer. No, that would be Oliver, an annoying nobody who mumbled through his songs. Phil Harris, in his late 60s, was also painful to listen to.

But worse than the bottom tier musicians and horrible song selections were the backup dancers. They almost never danced in sync, and sometimes appeared to be laughing at the show.

This is really, really bad, but it's worth watching if you're a big fan of Frank Sinatra Jr. or terrible TV specials.


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