It all started when the transcontinental railroad decided to run a branch line up through the wild country right to the Mexican border. Phil Scott had charge of the survey and he met and ... See full summary »
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It all started when the transcontinental railroad decided to run a branch line up through the wild country right to the Mexican border. Phil Scott had charge of the survey and he met and fell in love with Bessie Davis whose father was a small rancher. Bessie and her sister, Nell, often came to the survey line to watch the young engineer and they came under the notice of Pedro Ramairez, a Mexican whose reputation was decidedly evil. To Ramairez's admiration for Bessie was added a desire to be revenged upon Phil who has resented the Mexican's insolence on more than one occasion. By abducting Bessie a double purpose would be served and Pedro sent his sister to tell Bessie that her sweetheart had been hurt and was calling for her. All unsuspecting, Bessie follows the girl and unhesitatingly enters the abandoned shack where Pedro is waiting for her. Bound, gagged and lashed to a beam Bessie is left alone to break her spirit while the plotters take themselves off. Meanwhile she had been ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Short | Drama

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Release Date:

5 December 1910 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Pictures representing girls carried away by ruffians should be kept out of every program
8 October 2015 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

What may be termed a typical border drama, with the jealousy of a Mexican as the cause for a good deal of disturbance. A girl is carried away and tied to a post in a shanty, while her kidnapper goes out, expecting to come back and work his pleasure with her. She manages to tear a piece from her white skirt and waves it through the stove- pipe opening. She is rescued and her kidnapper is captured and would have been lynched but for the timely arrival of the sheriff. As has been pointed out before, the pictures representing girls carried away by ruffians should be kept out of every program. Such scenes are much too suggestive. Girls struggling with ruffians or carried away to their lairs smacks too much of the former methods of carrying away women whenever they chose. The restraint which led the producers to turn the villain over to the sheriff instead of showing a lynching is to be commended. So much, at least, of the old type of bloodthirsty ruffianism has practically disappeared from the screen, to the great improvement of the pictures. If the carrying away of women and girls is suggested instead of shown producers will take another forward step. - The Moving Picture World, December 17, 1910


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