The widow was extremely fair to look upon. Harry and Jack were extremely in love with her, though their characters were widely different. Each tried to keep the other from getting an ... See full summary »
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Cast

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Jack
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Harry (as Harry C. Myers)
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Mary Lamson - a Settler's Daughter
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Storyline

The widow was extremely fair to look upon. Harry and Jack were extremely in love with her, though their characters were widely different. Each tried to keep the other from getting an advantage. One day, Harry slipped in from the range, and proposed to the widow. That fair lady promptly rejected him. A short time afterward, Jack called. Did the lady reject Jack? Not much. A couple of days later, at the post office, "Bright Eyes," a young Indian girl, was insulted by Harry. The widow interfered between Harry and the Indian girl. Harry then transferred his attentions to the widow, whereupon Jack knocked him down, and real live gun play was averted only by the appearance of several cowboys, who separated them. One day the widow and her little boy were out rowing on the river with Jack. They landed to take a walk through the woods, leaving the child sitting in the boat. Harry appeared at this point, and true to his nature, sought to get revenge by pushing the boat off and letting it drift ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Genres:

Short | Drama

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Release Date:

29 June 1911 (USA)  »

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Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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It is not very exciting
7 March 2016 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

In this western picture there is no typically western scenery; a beautiful but very quiet stream is the background of most of the story. The pretty widow has two lovers; the one who is the villain is rejected. The villain pushes away from the bank a rowboat in which the widow's little girl is sitting, but there is not much suggestion of danger in the boat's floating on that quiet stream. A woman, who has not appeared in the picture until then, jumps in and swims out to the boat, but there are no oars. Indians now get the boat and draw it to shore. At first we do not know whether they are friendly or not, and though, in other places, the mother is shown to be nervous, we can't see any particular danger. The woman who swam to the boat was so unaccountably helpless that we suspected that she was in league with the Indians, whether friendly or not, till we saw her bound. Word is carried to the widow and then cowboys chase the Indians through a not- very-wild country. There's a pistol fight and the child and woman are rescued. It is not very exciting. The acting is good. - The Moving Picture World, July 15, 1911


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