Elizabeth Logan along with Hart volunteers to take part in a prison legal assistance program. They soon get more than they expected, from activist/prisoner Eric Ryerson.

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(based on the novel by), (developed for television by) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
...
James Stephens ...
Tom Fitzsimmons ...
Franklin Ford III (credit only)
...
...
Jonathan Segal ...
Jonathan Brooks (credit only)
Francine Tacker ...
Elizabeth Logan
...
Asheley Brooks (credit only)
David Ackroyd ...
Eric Ryerson
Len Birman ...
Prof. Dudley Rolfe
...
Luis Sanchez
Donald Hotton ...
Clement Corcoran
Art Lund ...
Capt. Arnold Olsson
...
Tonyo Meléndez ...
Raul Sanchez (as Tonyo Melendez)
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Storyline

Elizabeth Logan along with Hart volunteers to take part in a prison legal assistance program. They soon get more than they expected, from activist/prisoner Eric Ryerson.

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Drama

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10 October 1978 (USA)  »

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(RCA Photophone Sound Recording)

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1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

 
While the episode seemed a tad too obvious, the theme was exciting and well worth seeing.
1 February 2012 | by (Bradenton, Florida) – See all my reviews

Seen today, "Voices of Silence" might make a lot less sense. But, coming in the 1970s when terrorist groups like the Symbianese Liberation Army, Fuerzas Armadas de Liberación Nacional Puertorriqueña, and the Weathermen were in full swing, the context does make sense if you think about it. However, I do think while I loved this topic being included in the show, I do wish it had been done with a bit more subtlety. Still, despite this, it's well worth seeing.

Logan (Francine Tacker) gets her first episode which emphasizes her character. Since she is big on the notions of social justice and believes that civil liberties are often violated by governments, she decides to volunteer to help a program that gives legal assistance to folks in prison. While she and the rest are only first-year law students, they can at least assist with some advice or help filling out legal papers. Logan goes into this expecting to fight the system and seems to genuinely feel that many folks in prison are there because of government repression. The problem is that with all her preconceptions, she goes into the volunteer position with lots of enthusiasm and energy--but also LOTS of naiveté! So much, in fact, that she is completely adversarial towards the prison and blindly believes anything her new client tells her. As a result, she is used by this supposedly misunderstood victim--and it's up to Hart to come to the rescue.

I think having her be a little less naive and stupid would have made for a better episode--and perhaps the writer was trying to make their point too easily by making Logan so dumb. Lenin would have called such a woman a 'useful idiot'! However, despite this, it was an exciting show and made you think. I especially enjoyed hearing James Stevens (Hart) speaking Spanish. It wasn't great but was nice to hear someone using the language when working with their client--something you don't generally see in TV or films.


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