Clara, the daughter of John Grey, is making her accustomed calls on the poor in the lower East Side of New York, finds the Fenilosi family, consisting of mother, Mona, aged nineteen, Ross, ... See full summary »

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(as Oscar C. Apfel)
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Cast

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Samuel Rice
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Clara Grey
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Storyline

Clara, the daughter of John Grey, is making her accustomed calls on the poor in the lower East Side of New York, finds the Fenilosi family, consisting of mother, Mona, aged nineteen, Ross, aged seven and Toni, aged eight, living in utmost poverty in one room, amid shockingly unsanitary conditions. The mother is ill and unable to work, and in order to earn bread for the family, Mona is making artificial flowers, assisted by the other two children. Clara, desirous of helping them, gives Mona an order for several hundred flowers which, she explains, she desires to use in making a large bell for her wedding, which is to take place in a short time. Clara, her fiancé, Samuel Rice, and their friends, Dr. Watts and Marian Linsey, are busily engaged decorating the wedding bell. During the process Clara has several slight fainting spells but as they pass away almost immediately, no importance is attached to them. Clara and Rice are married the next evening, but no sooner has the minister ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Genres:

Short | Drama

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Release Date:

17 March 1911 (USA)  »

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Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

A life touch which contributes to its interest
12 December 2015 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

An educational film in that it shows the horrible conditions which exist in many tenements in the large cities. It clearly represents where many serious cases of typhoid originate and while there is not attempt at drama in the narrative it is dramatic in the strength of its simple story. The menace is brought home to the owner of the tenement in such a graphic way that it cannot be misunderstood. Such an appeal is impossible in a majority of instances, but in this instance it helps the picture, giving a life touch which contributes to its interest. The picture will do quite as good work as the Red Cross and other similar films which have gone before. - The Moving Picture World, April 1, 1911


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