Baseball: Season 1, Episode 7

The Capital of Baseball (26 Sep. 1994)

TV Episode  -   -  Documentary | History | Sport
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The episode covers the 1950s and deals with several key events and issues: the dominance of the Yankees, the continuing integration of the game and the move to the West Coast of the Dodgers... See full summary »

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Title: The Capital of Baseball (26 Sep 1994)

The Capital of Baseball (26 Sep 1994) on IMDb 8.3/10

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Cast

Episode credited cast:
John Chancellor ...
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Mario Cuomo ...
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Alex Lewis ...
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Charles McDowell ...
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Jackie Robinson ...
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Paul Roebling ...
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Storyline

The episode covers the 1950s and deals with several key events and issues: the dominance of the Yankees, the continuing integration of the game and the move to the West Coast of the Dodgers and Giants. The Yankees dominate baseball in the 1950s, winning 9 American League pennants and the World Series 5 times. For their rivals, particularly the Brooklyn Dodgers, every season proved to be a case of 'wait until next year'. The Dodgers year finally came in 1955 but with dwindling attendance, both the Dodgers and the NY Giants announce a few years later that they are moving to the West Coast. Integration of the game continued throughout this period but as one observer notes, the democratization of the game meant the end of the Negro leagues, at one time the largest Black-owned business in America. Written by garykmcd

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Release Date:

26 September 1994 (USA)  »

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Quotes

Billy Crystal: [on baseball in New York in the 1950's] It was one of the greatest times, watching Mickey, Willie, and the Duke. And you go out to the corner bar and you would hear the arguements.
[in Harlem accent]
Billy Crystal: "Willie's the greatest! He can do anything!"
[in Brooklyn accent]
Billy Crystal: "You're nuts, it's the Duke! The Duke is a classic! You ever see him running with his elbows in like that?"
[in Bronx accent]
Billy Crystal: "Guys, you are both wrong. It's Mickey and that's it! He's strong, he's blond, he hits from both sides of the ...
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Crazy Credits

The end credits for this episode are replete with baseball nicknames, such as Ken "the Kid" Burns, Lynn "The Babe" Novick, and John "Iron Horse" Chancellor. See more »

Soundtracks

Brooklyn Dodger Jump
Written by George T. Simon and Joe Ricardel
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User Reviews

 
It's All About New York City
12 August 2007 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

This tape (DVD) is definitely for New York City area baseball fans, but the rest of us can enjoy a lot of this, too. The 130 minutes centers on the decade's dominance of the game by the New York Yankees, Brooklyn Dodgers and New York Giants. This was interesting and I don't dispute the New York City teams' dominance but they could have given more coverage to some of the great stars from the other teams: men like Stan Musial, Ernie Banks, Al Kaline, etc. Instead, it's almost all New York.

The highlights, of course, begin with Bobby Thompson's famous 1951 home run, "The Shot Heard 'Round The World." We also see the famous catch by Willie Mays in the '54 classic; Sandy Amoros' catch for Brooklyn the year "the Bums" finally beat the Yankees as Johnny Podres pitched two big wins, then Don Larsen's perfect game for the Yankees.

Speaking of the Yankees, we get a nice profile on Mickey Mantle. Who knows how good he might have been - maybe the best ever - if he had been healthy. Mays also is a candidate for one of the top three players of all time and Boston's Ted Williams, some still think, was baseball's greatest hitter and he starred in this decade, too.

With so many contributers to this series being New York City-based people, I expected and didn't mind all the New York teams coverage, but the bias went into the political realm here with enormous plus for New York governor Mario Cuomo. It looked like the Liberal Democrat's campaign team put out this tape! I couldn't believe the amount of time they gave him here, but it's not a shock considering it's Burns and PBS, too. Also, I didn't care for George Plimpton's blasphemous statements in this segment. His elitist views fit right in, I suppose.

Despite the incredible decade for the NYC teams, the decade ends on a real downer as the Dodgers and Giants move West to Los Angeles and San Francisco, respectively, in the late '50s.


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