Needs 5 Ratings

The Road to the Dawn (1913)

In a New England village lives Bill Hedrick, the town drunkard. Bill works only enough to procure the four dollars to pay for the jug of liquor which is expressed to him, C.O.D. in the city... See full summary »
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Mary Powers ...
The Child
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In a New England village lives Bill Hedrick, the town drunkard. Bill works only enough to procure the four dollars to pay for the jug of liquor which is expressed to him, C.O.D. in the city from which the liquor is shipped, Mary Lane, a widow, still young, but broken by privation, realizing that her end is near, takes her little girl, Daisy, to the express office, consigns her to a close relative and goes quickly away. In a little bag about the child's neck she has placed a little ring, hand-made from a gold coin, and has told the child to allow no one to touch it. At the railway station the tag hastily tied to Daisy's arm comes off, as does that on Bill's jug. The agent, in replacing the tags, switches them, so that in due time Daisy arrives at Bill's address, with $4 charges. Bill attempts to refuse the consignment, but the local agent, not knowing what else to do with the child, bullies Bill into paying the C.O.D. Bill takes the child to his shack and puts her to bed. He discovers ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Short | Drama

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4 September 1913 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

Fails to convince and is a bit too conventional
13 November 2017 | by See all my reviews

A two-part special picture that makes a fair offering. The situation has an appealing sentiment, but the story, although the climax is very good, fails to convince and is a bit too conventional. It was not really good enough for a two-part offering, but might have been a big picture in a thousand feet. It shows us how a child recalls old memories (a love story), to a drunken blacksmith and, without rubbing in his determination not to drink any more or making it sentimental, it clearly shows that he is trying to reform. Tempted beyond his strength, he is one night about to take the child's ring to buy liquor when he discovers that it is one he made for the sweetheart of his youth and so knows that it is her orphan child he has taken in and is caring for. This strengthens him and we have a happy ending. Arthur Johnson plays the blacksmith and Lottie Briscoe the mother of the child. The child was not a very happy choice for this picture; there wasn't enough life in her as an actress. - The Moving Picture World, September 20, 1913


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