China's first manned mission to the Moon reveals the Apollo 11 cover-up that mankind has never been alone.

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Cast

Credited cast:
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Secretary of State Elisabeth Seward
Jeffrey Phillips ...
President Robert Anderson
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Lindy Nettleton ...
Prime Minister Allison Colby
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Steven Johnson
Marianne Phinney ...
Susan Anderson
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
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Secret Service Agent (as Michael Coppola)
Gregg Creeden ...
Chief of Staff
Steven Dennis ...
Secret Service Agent
Dan Fontaine ...
Secret Service Agent
Cynthia Grenier ...
Woman on Beach
Tara Groccia ...
Anchor
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Himself (archive footage)
Jeremy Lamprey ...
Secret Service Agent
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Aide to the Prime Minister (as Kristi Drake)
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Storyline

In the early 1960's NASA discovered a vast and advanced civilization on the Moon with their first space probes. While this civilization was able to shield itself from all Earth-based visual detection devices, President Kennedy's speech from 1961 that declared the intent to "Put a man on the Moon and return him safely to the Earth" was not designed as a space race with the Soviet Union, but to secretly establish contact with this newly discovered civilization. This discovery was classified and false images from the Moon were transmitted during all the Apollo missions. When the Earth mission of this new civilization was discovered, political forces demanded that President Nixon end manned missions to the Moon in 1972. First World commences in the year 2018 when the Chinese government announces it is making its first manned mission to the Moon within 24 hours. What does this civilization represent? Why was it covered up? Who knows about its existence? What is their mission? And what ... Written by Mark Lund

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

moon | space | soviet union | nasa | china | See All (51) »

Taglines:

The Revelation of Mankind

Genres:

Short | Action | Drama | Sci-Fi

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Release Date:

21 February 2009 (UK)  »

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$16,000 (estimated)
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Quotes

Cedric: Do you think they can do it?
Secretary of State Elisabeth Seward: If they don't, the Soviets probably will. But we have time.
Cedric: Time isn't the issue. Discovery is one thing, but our mission is quite another.
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Interesting concept, but fragmented and flawed
2 October 2009 | by (Estonia) – See all my reviews

I'm a true sci-fi buff. It's my favourite genre of film, literature, even music. So, I was quite excited when I stumbled upon this short film, which seemed quite promising.

Sadly, I was disappointed. There was nothing about this short film that would have made it memorable or exceptional -- the script came off paranoid and most of the actors were very stiff and didn't carry out the scenes. I also felt a bit let down. With this sort of a concept that would tickle every sci-fi fan's imagination, the story didn't offer any answers, dilemmas or explanations. It just sort of threw this half-baked and rather implausible idea out there and just let it sink.

Now don't get me wrong, I can fully understand this film had strict budgetary restraints, which naturally limits its story-telling abilities, but even story-wise it offered nothing original.

I do, however, sincerely hope the idea itself won't be lost. Meanwhile, I recommend everyone who have the same there-is-something-about-the-Moon thoughts rather read "Who Built the Moon" by Christopher Knight and Alan Butler. I can guarantee you it'll be more interesting and thought-provoking, and - most importantly - it doesn't use quotes by American presidents as its source of inspiration.


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