Mad Men (2007–2015)
8.0/10
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New Amsterdam 

Pete Campbell oversteps the mark when he pitches an idea for ad campaign to the head of Bethlehem Steel without telling Don Draper. Draper wants him fired but learns a lesson in corporate ... See full summary »

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Joan Holloway (credit only)
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Storyline

Pete Campbell oversteps the mark when he pitches an idea for ad campaign to the head of Bethlehem Steel without telling Don Draper. Draper wants him fired but learns a lesson in corporate politics. Pete's wife wants to buy a Manhattan apartment but he has to approach his cold and distant parents for a loan. Pete's in-laws, however, are more forthcoming. Written by garykmcd

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Drama

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TV-14 | See all certifications »

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Release Date:

9 August 2007 (USA)  »

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1.78 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Early in the episode, it is suggested that a client go see the musical "Bye Bye Birdie". Later, Don and Roger grumble about how even in biblical times there were probably men complaining about kids. While not specifically mentioned, the musical features a song called "What's the Matter with Kids Today?" See more »

Goofs

Pete and Trudy's new apartment is at Park Ave. and 82nd. At the end, Pete looks out the apartment window on a view of Central Park that is impossible from that location. He's looking from the top of the Park, directly south, as though he's on 110th (or higher) between 5th Ave. and 8th Ave. (which encompass the width of the Park). With this impossible view, Pete takes in a nighttime skyline that includes the Chrysler Building and the Empire State Building; this is the New York equivalent of "all windows in Paris look out on the Eiffel Tower." See more »

Quotes

Don Draper: Listen, Pete, I need you to go get a cardboard box. Put your things in it. Okay?
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Connections

References Bonanza (1959) See more »

Soundtracks

Manhattan
(uncredited)
Lyrics by Lorenz Hart
Music by Richard Rodgers
Performed by Ella Fitzgerald
heard at the end of the story, through the closing credits
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User Reviews

 
"You don't know how to drink."
29 July 2010 | by (Italy) – See all my reviews

The fourth episode of Mad Men, titled New Amsterdam (that would be the original name of New York) takes a step back, temporarily abandoning lingering subplots - Dick Whitman, Pete and Peggy, Betty's troubling domestic situation - and offers a more character-driven piece instead, focusing in particular on the tense dynamic between Don Draper and his employees. The result remains as superb as ever.

The tension is caused by Pete's sudden decision to go "rogue": while Don and his team are busy coming up with ideas for a new ad campaign, he goes in and pitches his own idea - without telling his superiors. This leads to a serious confrontation with Don, who has every intention of firing the guy ("Pete, I want you to take a cardboard box, and out all your stuff in it."), but is forced to relent after a talk with Roger Sterling that teaches him a lot about corporate politics. On a side-note, Pete's wife wants to buy an apartment in Manhattan, and Pete's parents are quite cold when it comes to a loan. Fortunately, the in-laws are much more welcoming...

The episode's focus on Pete allows Vincent Kartheiser to go even further in showing his range after the events of the first two episodes, having successfully moved on from the peculiar "troubled teenager" type he played on Angel. In particular, his scenes with Jon Hamm are a great example of two acting generations brilliantly squaring off. The same is true for Hamm's amusing scene with Slattery, which provides a predictable but spot-on justification for the characters' excessive drinking: "We drink because it's what men do". A class act, indeed.


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