7.4/10
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Lovable (2007)

At some point, everyone has asked the question, why is it so hard to find love? In this final installment of the autobiographical trilogy that includes Vinyl and I, Curmudgeon, Alan Zweig ... See full summary »

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At some point, everyone has asked the question, why is it so hard to find love? In this final installment of the autobiographical trilogy that includes Vinyl and I, Curmudgeon, Alan Zweig reflects with disarming candour on why, if he longs for a partner and children, he is still single at mid-life. Through intimate, heartfelt and often hilarious interviews with a series of diverse, smart and attractive single women, Zweig explores yearnings for the romantic myths of our culture and the difficulty of finding and sustaining relationships. Some women have come to accept and prefer being alone, but many still dream of a future they can share. Rather than remaining the objective observer, Zweig approaches his female subjects as kindred spirits, sharing their vulnerability and openness. A perfect mixed tape of love songs provides the backdrop for this courageously candid look at love and longing. Written by Hot Docs

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23 April 2007 (Canada)  »

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These Things
Written by Jack Breakfast
Performed by Jack Breakfast
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I don't want to be in the sequel
25 June 2007 | by See all my reviews

The movie is a collection of interviews of women who are single at later stages of life. The interviews are intertwined with the filmmaker's own thoughts on his extended bachelorhood.

The movie has little fanfare, it lets the emotion come pouring out. Not in a bloodletting way, more of "let's look at this rationally" way. The style and tone of the movie really lets the depth of the concerns of single-too-long people really come to the forefront.

The movie feels long. At first it seemed funny - like that silliness one gets when they realize they are about to be emotionally exposed - but then the humor was overcome by the length. At 101 minutes, it isn't long by many standards. The tempo isn't tedious. It just seems long and endless.

But this is for good effect. It emphasizes the burden these people feel and the pointless emptiness of being alone. It's not like they are suffering a disease and the race is one for a cure, it's not like there is redemption for the missteps that led them to their state.

The most curious element of the film is that the filmmaker is always in a mirror because he's always behind the camera. There seems to be some kind of commentary there, nevertheless it seems like there's a wall between he and all of his female interviewees. (There isn't a lot of dialog in the movie - it's nearly all monologues.)

It's a documentary, not a drama. It is plain but not "raw." It states the obvious, there isn't a discovery. It's certainly not a first date movie, it isn't something you want to watch after a breakup.

I hope I don't wind up in a sequel but there's a woman or two in my past I'd nominate for a role in it. ;)


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