Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps
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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

1-20 of 35 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


First Look: Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt swept away in romantic drama 'By the Sea'

15 September 2014 10:17 AM, PDT | EW - Inside Movies | See recent EW.com - Inside Movies news »

“But no man moved me till the tide / 
Went past my simple shoe /And past my apron and my belt /
And past my bodice too / And made as he would eat me up / 
As wholly as a dew…”

Whether or not this poem by Emily Dickinson, published under the title By the Sea, served as inspiration for Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt’s new film of the same name, the spirit seems to match up with its story of a woman caught in an undertow of passion and rejuvenation while visiting a seaside village with her husband.

By the Sea »

- Anthony Breznican

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10 Movie Sequels That Took Way Too Long

26 August 2014 8:31 AM, PDT | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

Generally when a movie enjoys astronomical success, movie studios will start prepping a sequel the second they realise they’re onto a winner, either when a confident producer sees some raw footage from the set, or most often once those first weekend box office tallies start coming in. Hollywood is in large part driven by sequels, and though we frequently complain about this indicating a lack of creativity in the industry, if they’re going to do it regardless, movie studios at least need to strike while the iron is hot.

These 10 movies, however, did the exact opposite, making us wait years, even numerous decades before we got our hands on a long-anticipated, much-discussed follow-up, by which point too much time had passed and the results (for one of many reasons) weren’t quite what we were hoping for. Perhaps audiences had just grown tired of waiting, or the original »

- Jack Pooley

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Stars who reprised Oscar winning roles

26 August 2014 3:05 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Michael Douglas. Anthony Hopkins. Just two actors who've returned to play the parts that won them Oscars...

When Oscar glory comes knocking for a successful Hollywood actor, it must be hugely tempting when the chance arrives for them to reprise that award-winning role. But while sequels and reboots are a common enough sight in the movie industry these days, examples of stars who've returned to their Oscar-winning roles are relatively few and far between.

The reason, perhaps, is because it's so difficult to recapture the creative lightning in a bottle that led to the Oscar win in the first place. Nevertheless, some actors do occasionally take up the offer and return to the filmmaking well. And as the list below proves, the results can sometimes be highly accomplished - though seldom quite as powerful and fresh as the films they're following...

Gene Hackman

Won for: The French Connection

Played the »

- ryanlambie

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'Search for Happiness' Director Heads 'Out of This World' for Sci-Fi

5 August 2014 8:46 AM, PDT | firstshowing.net | See recent FirstShowing.net news »

Relativity Media didn't have much success with their family sci-fi adventure Earth to Echo, but that doesn't mean they're giving up on the genre. Deadline has word that the studio is developing Out of This World, another sci-fi adventure about a kid named Gardner who leads a rather unique life because he's raised by scientists in secret on a Mars colony after his astronaut mother passes away. Flash forward 16 years and Gardner heads back to Earth in order to road trip across America with a young woman, in search of the father that he has never known. That's an interesting twist on an otherwise familiar coming-of-age tale. The script comes from Allan Loeb (Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps, Rock of Ages) and Hector and the Search for Happiness director Peter Chelsom will be at the helm of the film. Considering the charm that Chelsom brought to romantic comedies with Serendipity, »

- Ethan Anderton

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As You Shake Your Head at Shia Labeouf, Look Back on His Heyday of Hotness

27 June 2014 11:05 AM, PDT | Popsugar.com | See recent Popsugar news »

While a lot of us can't help but remember Shia Labeouf as a goofy teenager on Disney's Even Stevens, it's worth noting that he also had one hell of a heyday as an adult actor (please see: Transformers and Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps). Sure, his career may have taken a few weird turns over the past couple of years (and the past couple of days) but there's no denying that Shia is still one very attractive dude. We're looking back on Shia's hottest moments - before the plagiarism scandals, paper bag mask, performance art, and recent arrest - in order to make sense of all this craziness. Keep reading to see them all now, and don't hesitate to let yourself swoon. Source: Getty / James Coldrey »

- Brittney Stephens

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In praise of Eli Wallach, the man who was Tuco

25 June 2014 10:29 AM, PDT | EW.com - PopWatch | See recent EW.com - PopWatch news »

How many careers can one man have? Eli Wallach was a Tony award-winning Broadway actor and a soldier, a leading pioneer in the realm of Method acting and Mr. Freeze on the Batman TV show, a villainous live wire and an elderly person so intrinsically soulful that just his presence in a movie could make you happy and sad for no apparent reason.

Wallach was already over 50 when he got his most famous role, and he had almost 50 years left on this earth afterwards. There are a couple of generations that probably only know the older Wallach, stepping into movies »

- Darren Franich

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'The Good, the Bad and the Ugly' Star Eli Wallach Passes Away at Age 98

25 June 2014 9:28 AM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

Legendary actor Eli Wallach, best known for his role as the villainous Tuco in The Good the Bad and the Ugly, passed away in New York City yesterday at the age of 98. The actor's passing was confirmed by his daughter, Katherine.

Born in 1915 in the Red Hook neighborhood of Brooklyn, Eli Wallach began studying acting after receiving a B.A. and M.S. in education from the University of Texas and City College of New York. His acting ambitions were cut short when he was drafted to serve in World War II, but he began acting in several plays upon his return to New York in 1945. In 1948, he was one of the 20 core actors who helped found The Actor's Studio, where he honed his method acting craft.

He won a Tony Award in 1951 for his performance in Tennessee Williams' The Rose Tattoo, which was directed by Elia Kazan. Tennessee Williams »

- MovieWeb

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Eli Wallach: A Personal Remembrance

25 June 2014 8:38 AM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

Cinema Retro Editor-in-Chief Lee Pfeiffer with Eli Wallach at The Players in New York City.

 

By Lee Pfeiffer

Cinema Retro mourns the loss of Eli Wallach, the prolific actor of screen, stage and television, who passed away Tuesday in his New York City home. He was 98 years old. Wallach was one of the last of the Hollywood legends. He rarely enjoyed a leading role but was considered to be one of the most respected character actors of the post-wii era. He was as diversified as a thespian could be and would play heroes, villains and knaves with equal ease. For retro movie lovers, his two most iconic performances were as the Mexican bandit Calvera in John Sturges' classic 1960 film The Magnificent Seven and as Tuco, the charismatic rogue bandit in Sergio Leone's landmark 1966 production of The Good, the Bad and the Ugly. Although he never won or was »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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R.I.P. Eli Wallach: 1915 – 2014

25 June 2014 7:54 AM, PDT | Collider.com | See recent Collider.com news »

Oscar, Tony, and Emmy-winner Eli Wallach has passed away at the age of 98.  Wallach, a Method actor who was an original member of the Actor's Studio, was perhaps best known for his role as Tuco, aka 'The ugly', in The Good, the Bad and the Ugly.  Sergio Leone's 1966 spaghetti western is one of my all-time favorite films, and Wallach is unforgettable in it.  He's filthy, crass, unrefined, and absolutely charming.  His character has one of the best pieces of advice of any chatty killer: "When you have to shoot, shoot.  Don't talk."  It's a line that perfectly sums up his character in the span of less than ten seconds.  He's ruthless, unfair, and funny, and Wallach made the character feel real rather than contrived or exaggerated. Hit the jump for more. During his 65-year career, Wallach appeared in more than 80 films, numerous Broadway productions (he won a Tony for »

- Matt Goldberg

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Eli Wallach Has Died at the Age of 98

25 June 2014 7:16 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

The first time I probably saw Eli Wallach was in the 1960s "Batman" television show as Mr. Freeze, but I don't remember anything from those episodes other than how it looked. The first time I saw Wallach and remember him from a role in a movie is probably as Don Altobello in Francis Ford Coppola's The Godfather: Part III. But Wallach's most memorable role, for me at least, is undoubtedly as Tuco in Sergio Leone's iconic spaghetti western The Good, the Bad and the Ugly. Today we learn Wallach is as we will remember him as he died Tuesday, June 24, at the age of 98. His death was confirmed by his daughter Katherine. Wallach's career spanned more than 60 years and also included films such as Elia Kazan's Baby Doll, Clint Eastwood's Mystic River, John Sturgess' The Magnificent Seven, John Huston's The Misfits and the massive ensemble »

- Brad Brevet

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R.I.P. Eli Wallach

25 June 2014 6:20 AM, PDT | Dark Horizons | See recent Dark Horizons news »

Legendary multi-award winning actor Eli Wallach died on Tuesday from natural causes. He was 98.

Wallach has appeared in more than eighty films since his first starring role in 1956's "Baby Doll," though is perhaps best remembered for his key roles in two of the most famous westerns of all time - "The Good, The Bad and the Ugly" and "The Magnificent Seven".

Other films in which he often played a memorable role included his turns as Guido in "The Misfits, " The General in "Lord Jim," Napoleon in "The Adventures of Gerard", Don Altobello in "The Godfather Part III," Adam Coffin in "The Deep," Cotton Weinberger in "The Two Jakes," Donald Fallon in "The Associate," and small but key roles in more recent fare like "Mystique River," "The Ghost Writer," "The Holiday" and his final film "Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps".

He has also guest starred on countless TV shows from "ER, »

- Garth Franklin

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Rip Eli Wallach

25 June 2014 5:42 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Eli Wallach, the star of many a classic Old Hollywood Western, passed away Tuesday, The New York Times reported. He was 98.

Wallach was most notably known as Tuco from Sergio Leone’s masterpiece The Good, The Bad and the Ugly, but he also worked alongside Clark Gable and Marilyn Monroe in The Misfits, Yul Brynner in The Magnificent Seven, Al Pacino in The Godfather Part III and many more as one of the finest character actors of his day.

As an actor, he took up the “Method” school of thought and studied at the Actors Studio alongside Marlon Brando, Sidney Lumet and his eventual wife, actress Anne Jackson, with whom he leaves three children.

Wallach first came to stardom in Elia Kazan’s 1956 Baby Doll, earning him a BAFTA for Most Promising Newcomer to Film and a Golden Globe nomination for Best Supporting Actor. The Academy eventually awarded him with »

- Brian Welk

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In memoriam: Eli Wallach

25 June 2014 12:20 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Eli Wallach, star of The Good, The Bad And The Ugly, has sadly passed away at the age of 98.

News

We're sad to report that Eli Wallach, perhaps best known for his scintillating turn as the bandit Tuco in The Good, The Bad And The Ugly has sadly passed away.

A veteran of the stage as well as a master in front of the camera, Wallach amassed a fine collection of work that began all the way back in the 1940s when he made his Broadway debut. A lover of the stage, Wallach would star in a number of Broadway productions and was rewarded with a Tony Award in 1951 for his role in Tennessee Williams's play, The Rose Tattoo.

His versatility later saw Wallach move forward into film, making his debut in 1956 film Baby Doll, a role that would propel him to greater heights as he later starred in 1960's The Magnificent Seven, »

- ryanlambie

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R.I.P. Eli Wallach (1915-2014)

24 June 2014 11:56 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

American actor Eli Wallach has passed away aged 98, it has been announced. The character actor, whose credits includes The Magnificent Seven and The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, had enjoyed a career spanning more than six decades, and in 2010 he was the recipient of an Honorary Academy Award for his achievements in film, where he was described as “the quintessential chameleon, effortlessly inhabiting a wide range of characters, while putting his inimitable stamp on every role”

Born in Brooklyn in 1915, Wallach began his career on the stage in the 1940s, winning a Tony Award in 1951 for The Rose Tattoo. He made his feature film debut in 1956 with Baby Doll, receiving a Golden Globe nomination for Best Supporting Actor, and subsequently went on to appear in over 100 movies and TV shows including The Misfits, How the West Was Won, The Godfather: Part III, The Ghost and his final film, Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps. »

- Gary Collinson

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Eli Wallach dies aged 98

24 June 2014 11:54 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Eli Wallach, the veteran character actor whose film credits included The Magnificent Seven and The Good, The Bad And The Ugly, has died. He was 98.

Wallach was born in Brooklyn and studied acting at the Neighborhood Playhouse before service in the Army in the Second World War, when he advanced to the rank of captain in the Medical Corps.

He returned to acting swiftly after the War, making his Broadway debut in 1945 in Skydrift. Six years later he won a Tony for Tennessee WilliamsThe Rose Tattoo.

Theatre would remain his first love and he acted in such plays as The Typists, The Tiger, The Price, Rhinoceros and The Diary Of Anne Frank.

Big screen roles brought in the money, though, and Wallach made a name for himself in Hollywood in the likes of The Misfits opposite Marilyn Monroe, Lord Jim with Peter O’Toole and The Godfather: Part III.

More recently »

- jeremykay67@gmail.com (Jeremy Kay)

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Eli Wallach, 1915-2014

24 June 2014 11:54 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Eli Wallach, the veteran character actor whose film credits included The Magnificent Seven and The Good, The Bad And The Ugly, has died. He was 98.

Wallach was born in Brooklyn and studied acting at the Neighborhood Playhouse before service in the Army in WWII, when he advanced to the rank of captain in the Medical Corps.

He returned to acting swiftly after the War, making his Broadway debut in 1945 in Skydrift. Six years later he won a Tony for Tennessee WilliamsThe Rose Tattoo.

Theatre would remain his first love and he acted in such plays as The Typists, The Tiger, The Price, Rhinoceros and The Diary Of Anne Frank.

Big screen roles brought in the money, though, and Wallach made a name for himself in Hollywood in the likes of The Misfits opposite Marilyn Monroe, Lord Jim with Peter O’Toole and The Godfather: Part III.

More recently he appeared in Roman Polanski’s Ghost Writer »

- jeremykay67@gmail.com (Jeremy Kay)

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'The Good, The Bad And The Ugly' Star Eli Wallach Dead at 98

24 June 2014 10:15 PM, PDT | Entertainment Tonight | See recent Entertainment Tonight news »

The legendary character actor passed away after a career spanning six decades.

Eli Wallach, arguably one of the world's greatest character actors whose career spanned over 60 years, has passed away at the age of 98.

Wallach, best known for his iconic roles as the villainous gunslinger in The Good, The Bad and The Ugly and as the even-more villainous bandit in The Magnificent Seven, acted even in his final years, appearing most recently in Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps in 2010.

Related Pics: Stars We've Lost

Wallach was born in Brooklyn, New York in 1915, and went to the University Of Austin, Texas where he got his bachelor's degree in history in 1936. It was in college that Wallach began acting in plays. He made his Broadway debut in 1945 and six years later won a Tony Award for his role in The Rose Tattoo, a play by Tennessee Williams.

Wallach's feature film debut came in 1956 in the Elia Kazan-directed [link=tt »

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Eli Wallach, ‘The Good, the Bad and the Ugly’ Star, Dies at 98

24 June 2014 10:07 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Tony- and Emmy-winning actor Eli Wallach, a major proponent of “the Method” style of acting best known for his starring role in Elia Kazan’s film “Baby Doll” and for his role as villain Tuco in iconic spaghetti Western “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly,” died on Tuesday, according to the New York Times. He was 98.

On the bigscreen Wallach had few turns as a leading man, but none was as strong as his first starring role in 1956’s “Baby Doll,” in which he played a leering cotton gin owner intent on seducing the virgin bride (Carroll Baker) of his business rival (Karl Malden). But he appeared in more than 80 films, offering colorful turns in character roles in movies such as “The Magnificent Seven,” “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly,” “Nuts,” “Lord Jim,” “The Misfits” and “The Two Jakes.”

The actor, who appeared in a wide variety of stage, »

- Carmel Dagan

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Eli Wallach, ‘The Good, the Bad and the Ugly’ Star, Dies at 98

24 June 2014 10:07 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Tony- and Emmy-winning actor Eli Wallach, a major proponent of “the Method” style of acting best known for his starring role in Elia Kazan’s film “Baby Doll” and for his role as villain Tuco in iconic spaghetti Western “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly,” died on Tuesday, according to the New York Times. He was 98.

On the bigscreen Wallach had few turns as a leading man, but none was as strong as his first starring role in 1956’s “Baby Doll,” in which he played a leering cotton gin owner intent on seducing the virgin bride (Carroll Baker) of his business rival (Karl Malden). But he appeared in more than 80 films, offering colorful turns in character roles in movies such as “The Magnificent Seven,” “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly,” “Nuts,” “Lord Jim,” “The Misfits” and “The Two Jakes.”

The actor, who appeared in a wide variety of stage, »

- Carmel Dagan

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Eli Wallach, 'The Good, The Bad and The Ugly' Actor, Dies At 98

24 June 2014 9:00 PM, PDT | Uinterview | See recent Uinterview news »

Iconic stage and screen star Eli Wallach, known for performances in The Good, the Bad and the Ugly and The Magnificent Seven, died Tuesday. He was 98.

Eli Wallach Dies

Wallach’s death was confirmed by a family member to CNN.

Over the course of his storied career, Wallach accumulated more that 150 film credits. In addition to 60s Westerns The Magnificent Seven and The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, he starred in The Misfits, Lord Jim, Tour Guys, The Two Jakes, The Godfather: Part III and The Holiday. His last major motion picture was 2013’s Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps.

Among the Hollywood elite Wallach starred alongside were Clint Eastwood, Marilyn Monroe, Clark Gable, Kirk Douglas, Jack Nicholson and Kate Winslet.

Though film paid the bills, Wallach’s passion was the theatre. “For actors, movies are a means to an end," Wallach told The New York Times in 1973. "I go »

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

1-20 of 35 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


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