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This is the first time that Raging Bull (1980) (#4) and Vertigo (1958) (#9) have made the top 10 films. They were ranked #24 and #61 respectively when the original list was presented in 1997.
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The Graduate (1967) and On the Waterfront (1954) are both still on the list, but are dropped from their original positions in the top 10. They're now respectively positioned at #17 and #19.
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Out of the 43 new eligible films from 1996 to 2006, only The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001) (#50), Saving Private Ryan (1998) (#71), Titanic (1997) (#83), and The Sixth Sense (1999) (#89) made the list.
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The list includes 19 new additions from before 1996: The General (1926) (#18), Intolerance: Love's Struggle Throughout the Ages (1916) (#49), Nashville (1975) (#59), Sullivan's Travels (1941) (#61), Cabaret (1972) (#63), Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966) (#67), The Shawshank Redemption (1994) (#72), In the Heat of the Night (1967) (#75), All the President's Men (1976) (#77), Spartacus (1960) (#81), Sunrise (1927) (#82), A Night at the Opera (1935) (#85), 12 Angry Men (1957) (#87), Swing Time (1936) (#90), Sophie's Choice (1982) (#91), The Last Picture Show (1971) (#95), Do the Right Thing (1989) (#96), Blade Runner (1982) (#97) and Toy Story (1995) (#99).
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The Searchers (1956) moved up the list the most spots for any film - 84 from #96 to #12. City Lights (1931), Vertigo (1958) and Unforgiven (1992) also rose prominently, respectively moving from #76 to #11, #61 to #9 and #98 to #68.
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Steven Spielberg is the most represented director on the list with five films: Schindler's List (1993) (#8), E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial (1982) (#24), Jaws (1975) (#56), Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981) (#66) and Saving Private Ryan (1998) (#71). He was also the most represented director on the original list with the same number of films. ("Saving Private Ryan" replaced Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977) as the fifth entry.) Alfred Hitchcock, Stanley Kubrick and Billy Wilder each have four films on the list. Frank Capra, Charles Chaplin, Francis Ford Coppola, John Huston and Martin Scorsese each have three.
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Robert De Niro, Harrison Ford and James Stewart are the most represented actors with five films each on the list. Faye Dunaway, Katharine Hepburn and Diane Keaton are the most represented actresses with three each.
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Three years are tied for the most represented year with four films each: 1982, 1976 and 1969.
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The earliest film on the list is Intolerance: Love's Struggle Throughout the Ages (1916) (#49) and the most recent is The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001) (#50).
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The 1970s is the most represented decade with 20 films.
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Four silent films are on the list, three of which are new additions: The General (1926) (#18), Intolerance: Love's Struggle Throughout the Ages (1916) (#49) and Sunrise (1927) (#82). Modern Times (1936) is the fourth silent movie on the list, moving up three places from #81 to #78.
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Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937) (#34) and Toy Story (1995) (#99) are the only animated films on the list.
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Six musicals are on the list: Singin' in the Rain (1952) (#5), The Wizard of Oz (1939) (#10), The Sound of Music (1965) (#40), West Side Story (1961) (#51), Cabaret (1972) (#63) and Yankee Doodle Dandy (1942) (#99).
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Only three films on the list remain in their original positions: Citizen Kane (1941) (#1), The Godfather: Part II (1974) (#31) and The Best Years of Our Lives (1946) (#37).
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Twenty-three films were taken off the list: Doctor Zhivago (1965) (formerly #39), The Birth of a Nation (1915) (formerly #44), From Here to Eternity (1953) (formerly #52), Amadeus (1984) (formerly #53), All Quiet on the Western Front (1930) (formerly #54), The Third Man (1949) (formerly #57), Fantasia (1940) (formerly #58), Rebel Without a Cause (1955) (formerly #59), Stagecoach (1939) (formerly #63), Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977) (formerly #64), The Manchurian Candidate (1962) (formerly #67), An American in Paris (1951) (formerly #68), Wuthering Heights (1939) (formerly #73), Dances with Wolves (1990) (formerly #75), Giant (1956) (formerly #82), Fargo (1996) (formerly #84), Mutiny on the Bounty (1935) (formerly #86), Frankenstein (1931) (formerly #87), Patton (1970) (formerly #89), The Jazz Singer (1927) (formerly #90), My Fair Lady (1964) (formerly #91), A Place in the Sun (1951) (formerly #92) and Guess Who's Coming to Dinner (1967) (formerly #99).
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