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Green: The New Red, White and Blue (2007)

TV Movie  -   -  Documentary
6.3
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New York Times columnist Thomas L. Friedman looks at various "green" technologies--hydroelectric, solar, wind, and nuclear power, hybrid, electric, and hydrogen-fuel-cell cars, clean-coal, ... See full summary »

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Title: Green: The New Red, White and Blue (TV Movie 2007)

Green: The New Red, White and Blue (TV Movie 2007) on IMDb 6.3/10

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Thomas Friedman ...
Himself - Reporter and Writer (as Thomas L. Friedman)
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New York Times columnist Thomas L. Friedman looks at various "green" technologies--hydroelectric, solar, wind, and nuclear power, hybrid, electric, and hydrogen-fuel-cell cars, clean-coal, bio-fuels, and energy-conservation methods--being adopted by American businesses and families today, to reduce the output of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide and ultimately to reduce global warming and ensure political stability throughout the world. Written by yortsnave

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Respectable attempt to approach the subject objectively
17 September 2007 | by (Washington, DC) – See all my reviews

Although it is structured around the sort-of plot device of the fictional "Green" family (who is meant to represent a more-or-less average American suburban energy consumer) the film otherwise is made in a fairly straightforward, reporter-led, episodic, documentary style. Each "episode" (probably meant to accommodate commercial breaks) describes a different form of "green" energy, such as solar, wind, hybrid vehicles, etc, while also targeting the most egregious producers of hydrocarbons: conventional automobiles and coal-fired electric plants.

It is a very informative film, albeit a bit dry in places, with arguments that are, for the most part, developed in breadth rather than depth. Still, there are a few surprises, such as the sequence that supports nuclear energy as a "green" source. Indeed, while all of the other forms of energy (solar, wind, ethanol, etc) are applauded and encouraged as supplementary sources that can help to improve the overall situation, the film clearly takes the position that nuclear energy is the only known source of fuel that can realistically provide the quantity of energy necessary to reverse the global problem of hydrocarbon emissions. Unfortunately, the problems associated with the disposal of nuclear waste are only mentioned as an afterthought that almost casually trivializes the difficulty of that disposal when compared with the difficulty of containing hydrocarbon pollutants.

The film seems to make an attempt at being non-partisan, though the only political leader to appear in the film is Republican Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger, who appears to be very supportive of the "green" technologies.

Ultimately, the film is really about the economics of "green" and how that can affect the process of communicating the message of "green" to a capitalistic America. Up until recently, "green" was considered to be synonymous with "bad business." This film characterizes many "green" technologies as being highly profitable, wise potential investment opportunities for the future. It would make Ayn Rand pleased to know that, rather than gaining support for "green" via motives of altruism, the most effective way may be by stimulating the enthusiasm and technological innovation of our capitalistic, selfish (some may say "greedy") ideals.


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