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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

1-20 of 44 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Composer Carter Burwell’s Goodbye Christopher Robin Original Motion Picture Soundtrack CD Drops on October 27

26 September 2017 6:50 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Sony Classical announces the release of Goodbye Christopher Robin (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack) with an original score by Academy Award®-nominated composer Carter Burwell.

The soundtrack will be released digitally on October 13 and on CD on October 27, 2017. The film will be released in the Us on October 13, 2017.

Pre-order here.

Goodbye Christopher Robin is directed by Simon Curtis (My Week with Marilyn, Woman in Gold) and will be released in Us theaters by Fox Searchlight Pictures on October 13, 2017.

Carter Burwell said about the score:

“One of the riskier decisions Simon Curtis and I made with the score was to withhold the main theme until the middle of the film, when A. A. Milne begins to write and his friend Ernest Shepard begins to illustrate “Winnie The Pooh”. We did this to make that moment especially noteworthy, to make it the turning point of the story. Before that point, the music plays »

- Michelle Hannett

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The state of the Oscars race: who's in the lead after the big film festivals?

19 September 2017 3:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

With Venice and Toronto out of the way, there’s an ultra-competitive best actress race shaping up – but a lack of major best picture contenders

By the end of September last year, after the annual onslaught of festival premieres, we’d already seen seven of the year’s nine best picture nominees. Again, we’re back at the informed speculation stage: the reviews are in, the first trophies have been handed out and we can start to assemble a loose, yet likely, list of potential candidates.

The race officially kicked off in January and although Sundance has become a less reliable starting point for awards-friendly films, this year did offer up three major contenders. The most ecstatic reviews were given to I Am Love director Luca Guadagnino’s heartfelt gay romance Call Me by Your Name, which also received special notices for leads Armie Hammer and breakout star Timothee Chalamet. »

- Benjamin Lee

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Venice Film Review: George Clooney’s ‘Suburbicon’

2 September 2017 5:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The names Joel and Ethan Coen pop up on a lot of screenplays these days (“Bridge of Spies,” “Unbroken”), now that they’re getting credit for the kind of script-polishing they used to do anonymously. But “Suburbicon” marks the first time a script that could have been a full-blown Coen brothers film has been brought to the screen by someone else. The movie, directed by George Clooney, who along with his partner Grant Heslov re-wrote an old unproduced Coen brothers script (all four are now credited), stars Matt Damon as a dour, weaselly, amateur family-man criminal in the U.S. suburbs of 1959, and it’s clearly a close cousin to “Fargo.”

There are moments when you can taste the heightened comic spin that the Coens, as filmmakers, would have brought to the material. They would surely have made a bigger fetish of the Atomic Age trappings and decor (the way they did with the mid-’60s Midwestern »

- Owen Gleiberman

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1941: A Great Comedy For Slim Pickens Day

27 August 2017 11:12 AM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

On Monday, August 28, 2017, Turner Classic Movies will devote an entire day of their “Summer Under the Stars” series to the late, great Louis Burton Lindley Jr. If that name doesn’t sound familiar, well, then just picture the fella riding the bomb like a buckin’ bronco at the end of Dr. Strangelove…, or the racist taskmaster heading up the railroad gang in Blazing Saddles, or the doomed Sheriff Baker, who gets one of the loveliest, most heartbreaking sendoffs in movie history in Sam Peckinpah’s Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid.

Lindley joined the rodeo circuit when he was 13 and soon picked up the name that would follow him throughout the length of his professional career, in rodeo and in movies & TV. One of the rodeo vets got a look at the lank newcomer and told him, “Slim pickin’s. That’s all you’re gonna get in this rodeo. »

- Dennis Cozzalio

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The 100 Greatest Comedies of All-Time, According to BBC’s Critics Poll

22 August 2017 5:43 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

After polling critics from around the world for the greatest American films of all-time, BBC has now forged ahead in the attempt to get a consensus on the best comedies of all-time. After polling 253 film critics, including 118 women and 135 men, from 52 countries and six continents a simple, the list of the 100 greatest is now here.

Featuring canonical classics such as Some Like It Hot, Dr. Strangelove, Annie Hall, Duck Soup, Playtime, and more in the top 10, there’s some interesting observations looking at the rest of the list. Toni Erdmann is the most recent inclusion, while the highest Wes Anderson pick is The Royal Tenenbaums. There’s also a healthy dose of Chaplin and Lubitsch with four films each, and the recently departed Jerry Lewis has a pair of inclusions.

Check out the list below (and my ballot) and see more on their official site.

100. (tie) The King of Comedy (Martin Scorsese, »

- Jordan Raup

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After Soderbergh: See the Top 10 Box Office Track Records of Classic Indie Filmmakers

19 August 2017 12:40 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

In a career that began with “sex lies and videotape” in 1989, “Logan Lucky” is Steven Soderbergh’s 26th theatrical release. It will extend his record as the top-grossing American director to come out of the independent scene in its formative years — a period we’ll define as 1975 (Joan Micklin Silver’s “Hester Street”) through 1992 (Quentin Tarantino’s debut, “Reservoir Dogs”).

To be clear, Soderbergh’s an outlier; his billion-dollar box office dwarfs every other indie filmmaker. However, looking at the performance of his contemporaries who got their start in that indie film movement, you may be surprised at who’s on the list. (Note: “Outside wide release” means less than 1,000 screens. Also, the list doesn’t include directors like Sam Raimi and Abel Ferrara, who have independent roots but were not discovered via the film festival/arthouse pathway, or Alan Rudolph, another significant ’80s figure; he started in horror films in the early ’70s. »

- Tom Brueggemann

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Why Working Title’s Tim Bevan and Eric Fellner Are the Best Indie Producers in the World Right Now

10 July 2017 9:36 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Welcome to Career Watch, a vocational checkup of top actors and directors, and those who hope to get there. In this edition we take on Working Title producers Tim Bevan and Eric Fellner, whose latest hit is Edgar Wright’s wheel-and-disc-spinning breakout “Baby Driver” (June 28, Sony), which has tracked $64 million worldwide to date.

Bottom Line: This brainy duo with plummy British accents have been turning out a consistent slate of smart global hits since the ’80s. The London-based co-chairmen of Working Title boast the best taste in the business. They chase mainstream quality fare. That’s their gig. But even so over the years, partnering with Universal Pictures, with freedom to greenlight movies up to $35 million, their films have grossed an impressive almost $7 billion dollars worldwide.

Career Peaks: From the start, Working Title founder Tim Bevan gravitated to local stories with global potential like “My Beautiful Laundrette,” Stephen Frears’ searing »

- Anne Thompson

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Why Working Title’s Tim Bevan and Eric Fellner Are the Best Indie Producers in the World Right Now

10 July 2017 9:36 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Welcome to Career Watch, a vocational checkup of top actors and directors, and those who hope to get there. In this edition we take on Working Title producers Tim Bevan and Eric Fellner, whose latest hit is Edgar Wright’s wheel-and-disc-spinning breakout “Baby Driver” (June 28, Sony), which has tracked $64 million worldwide to date.

Bottom Line: This brainy duo with plummy British accents have been turning out a consistent slate of smart global hits since the ’80s. The London-based co-chairmen of Working Title boast the best taste in the business. They chase mainstream quality fare. That’s their gig. But even so over the years, partnering with Universal Pictures, with freedom to greenlight movies up to $35 million, their films have grossed an impressive almost $7 billion dollars worldwide.

Career Peaks: From the start, Working Title founder Tim Bevan gravitated to local stories with global potential like “My Beautiful Laundrette,” Stephen Frears’ searing »

- Anne Thompson

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Michael Stuhlbarg on ‘Fargo,’ The Coen Brothers’ Connection, and a Final Goodbye for Sy Feltz

5 July 2017 12:30 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

It’s a presumptive moment of exposure. One man guesses what another man is too afraid to say, but he goes further than the first man could’ve expected.

“You think…maybe… I don’t even want to say it out loud.”

Slave girls?”

No, Emmit Stussey wasn’t talking about slave girls, but his exchange with Sy Feltz became one of the stand-out comedic moments of “Fargo” Season 3, if not the series to date, because of the miscommunication. Beyond that, it’s also a telling illustration of the duo’s relationship. Sy wants to protect Emmit; more than that, he wants to do what Emmit is incapable of doing, for the good of their company.

Read More: Noah Hawley on the ‘Fargo’ Finale and Why the Fate of Gloria Burgle Matters More Than You Think

“I think Sy really liked being the guy behind the scenes who never took his boots off, »

- Ben Travers

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Who are the contemporary Masters of Cinema?

3 July 2017 6:15 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Anghus Houvouras on the contemporary Masters of Cinema…

Sometimes a good movie conversation can lead you to interesting places. Take the discussion around the wildly overpraised Baby Driver; a good movie that’s being called a ‘masterpiece’ (it’s not). During the discussion my friend Simon Columb posted this on Twitter:

Edgar Wright ain't no "master". Bloomin' eck pic.twitter.com/4HJzn2sS8X

— Simon Columb (@screeninsight) July 2, 2017

I love Edgar Wright. I’ve watched the entire catalog of his work many, many times. Hell, I’ve watched the two series of Spaced At Least a dozen times. The man has an amazing sense of style and kinetic storytelling that feels uniquely his own. But even with a gun to my head I would not list him among the modern contemporary masters of cinema (even one that shoots cars). But, thanks to that hyperbolic burst of circle-jerk fandom, a thought came to mind? »

- Anghus Houvouras

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'Fargo' Season Finale Recap: Trump Cards

21 June 2017 7:30 PM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

For months now, Fargo has entertained us with bus crashes, air conditioner murders, Hollywood sleazeballs, bridge tournaments, fake sex tapes and interdepartmental police squabbles. All the while, creator Noah Hawley has dropped us into a place where bad dudes manipulate the culture via hacking, trolling and outright lies – nothing like the world you see outside your front door, in other words. But after all its spectacular violence, unapologetic wackiness and barbed satire, this season ultimately ends quietly and elliptically, just the way it began – with a scene where a government »

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‘Fargo’ at Atx: Noah Hawley Talks Future Seasons and More

9 June 2017 5:32 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Austin, Texas — It was the last question of the Atx Television Festival’s “Fargo” panel, but probably foremost in the minds of the FX drama’s fans: Will there be a fourth season of the program?

Executive producer and showrunner Noah Hawley said he didn’t currently have an idea for a fourth season, but he certainly sounded open to a return to the wintry, crime-ridden Midwestern landscapes the show has explored in its first three seasons (the current season wraps up June 21).

“Here’s the thing — I wasn’t sure there was going to be a second season” after the first, and after the second was in the can, he was similarly unsure that there would be a third. Each time around, he explained, it took him some time to come up with the core concepts for the next season. He noted that FX executives were patient with that process, and »

- Maureen Ryan

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The Best Movies About the End of the World, From ‘Melancholia’ to ‘Dr. Strangelove’

5 June 2017 11:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film and TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: Apropos of absolutely nothing (and definitely not in response to a certain world leader taking disastrous steps towards dooming the environment of the only inhabitable planet we have), what is the best film about the end of the world?

Erin Whitney (@Cinemabite), ScreenCrush

It’s a hard tie between “Melancholia” and “Take Shelter.” One is a devastating meditation on depression, isolation and death, and the other is a dramatic masterpiece that evokes the dread and anxiety of a looming end. They’re very different films (and coincidentally opened within months of each other), but both end on final shots that left me breathless. »

- David Ehrlich

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TV News Roundup: Nickelodeon Orders ‘SpongeBob SquarePants’ Season 12

23 May 2017 3:00 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

In today’s roundup, Nickelodeon has ordered a 12th season of “SpongeBob SqaurePants,” The History Channel has commissioned a one-hour Watergate special, Investigation Discovery is airing a documentary special about Bill Cosby’s downfall, and production has begun on Cartoon Network’s “DC Super Hero Girls.”

Renewals

Nickeloden has ordered Season 12 of “SpongeBob SquarePants,” the number-one animated series across all TV with kids. The 26-episode pick up will further the nautical adventures of SpongeBob and his Bikini Bottom friends Patrick, Sandy, Mr. Krabs, Plankton and Squidward, and is scheduled to premiere in 2019, the series’ 20th anniversary year. Season 11 debuts later this summer. Nickelodeon has also greenlit a third SpongeBob film for release in 2019 as well. “Spongebob Squarepants” is executive produced by creator Stephen Hillenburg.

Casting

Richard Kind has been cast in the guest starring role of Benny Konopka in Electric Entertainment’s series “The Librarians,” which will run for a fourth season on TNT this winter. “The »

- Erin Nyren

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Fargo Recap: A Real Hollywood Ending

3 May 2017 8:07 PM, PDT | TVLine.com | See recent TVLine.com news »

Need to catch up? Check out our previous Fargo recap here.

Ewan McGregor, take the week off! Wednesday’s Fargo was a Carrie Coon solo showcase, as Gloria traveled to sunny L.A. to dig into her stepdad Ennis’ murky Hollywood past.

First, a super ’70s flashback to the younger days of Ennis, aka sci-fi author Thaddeus Mobley: He’s approached by sleazy film producer Howard Zimmerman, who wants to put his latest book on the big screen. Soon, Thad is caught up in the Hollywood lifestyle, sniffing coke and hooking up with a young actress named Vivian — and handing »

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘I Am Not Your Negro,’ ‘The Salesman,’ ‘Right Now, Wrong Then’ & More

2 May 2017 4:47 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

The Age of Shadows (Kim Ji-woon)

Eyebrows were raised when it was announced that South Korea will submit the as-yet-unreleased espionage thriller The Age of Shadows for Oscar consideration instead of Cannes hits The Handmaiden and The Wailing. Premiering out of competition at the 73rd Venice Film Festival, writer/director Jee-woon Kim’s return to Korean-language cinema after a brief stint in Hollywood with the Schwarzenegger-starrer The Last Stand turns out to be a worthy choice that makes »

- The Film Stage

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‘American Gods,’ a ‘Batman’ Documentary Plus More TV You Must See This Week

30 April 2017 11:01 AM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

American Gods

It’s been a long time coming, but American Gods is finally here, closing out a month that’s been filled with exciting new shows. With May, though, comes the return of a science program that ought to interest movie fans (Breakthrough) and a new feature documentary that ought to interest comic book fans (Batman & Bill). Plus we’ve finally got a new season of Sense8 and new episodes of some of the greatest TV series, Better Call Saul and Fargo, plus the penultimate chapter of Riverdale’s first season.

To help you keep track of the most important programs over the next seven days, here’s our guide to everything worth watching, whether it’s on broadcast, cable, or streaming for April 30–May 1:

SUNDAYAmerican Gods (Starz, 9pm)

Neil Gaiman’s 2001 novel hits the small screen from the showrunning team of Bryan Fuller (Hannibal) and screenwriter Michael Green (Logan), and it’s “the adaptation »

- Christopher Campbell

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Rumble Fish,’ ‘Tampopo,’ ‘Kaili Blues,’ ‘La La Land,’ and More

25 April 2017 5:23 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Anatahan (Josef von Sternberg)

Josef von Sternberg called Anatahan his best film. Borne from more than a decade’s worth of frustration with the studio system, it was, as the last picture he completed, his stamp on his time as a director. Even then, when released in 1953, it was only released in a butchered format, and, as it often goes in such cases, was subsequently abandoned by popular consciousness. But a few times each year, cinephiles (at least »

- The Film Stage

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'Fargo': A Guide to the Show's Coen Brothers' References

20 April 2017 6:48 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

There's a moment early in the new season premiere of the FX crime drama Fargo when a parole officer recalls how he met his fiancée, a slick hustler named Nikki Swango (played by Mary Elizabeth Winstead). As the episode flashes back to Nikki at a police station, getting booked and photographed, fans of filmmakers Joel and Ethan Coen might experience some deja vu. The situation, the way it's shot, and even the way the crook gets yanked around by the authorities – it's all right out of the Coens' 1987 comedy Raising Arizona. »

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Fargo Season 3 Episode 1 Review – ‘The Law of Vacant Places’

20 April 2017 3:40 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Shaun Munro reviews the first episode of Fargo season 3…

The painful 16-month wait since Fargo‘s second season concluded is finally over, and while not returning to screens with quite the same surging electricity of the two prior premieres, “The Law of Vacant Places” is nevertheless a rock solid introduction to Minnesota’s latest batch of loveable low-lives.

The season may be set in 2010, but it opens in East Berlin some 22 years earlier, as a case of mistaken identity results in a beleaguered citizen being told by an officer of the law, “We are not here to tell stories.” It’s a marvelously sharp way to externalise the “this is a true story…the names have been changed” mantra that opens every episode, and couldn’t feel much more different from how previous seasons kicked off.

The subsequent switch to 2010, however, invites a great deal more familiarity. Ewan McGregor pulls »

- Shaun Munro

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

1-20 of 44 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


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