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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

1-20 of 366 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children Review

16 hours ago | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children is a stuffy, supernatural period piece that fluctuates between “dull” and “exciting,” the latter description being lost in the former’s grasp. Tim Burton takes a more restrained route when adapting Ransom Riggs’ novel (screenplay by Jane Goldman), which is a breath of fresh air compared to previous endeavors like Alice In Wonderland and Dark Shadows (even Big Eyes to a degree) – but it’s still a tepid affair. What’s essentially X-Men: First Class meets The League Of Extraordinary Gentlemen (and women) takes entirely too long to uncover excitement, as the production opts for a dusty generational perspective instead of fantastical teen orphan adventure. Macabre fairy-tale-telling through strange character casting and minimal definition – certainly not the spectacle Burton hoped for.

Asa Butterfield stars as Jake Portman, an outcast Floridan whose best friend is his Grandfather, Abe (Terence Stamp). While at work one day, »

- Matt Donato

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‘Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children’ Review: X-Men Meets Harry Potter In Tim Burton’s Painfully Clichéd Ya Saga

25 September 2016 8:00 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

“Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children” is a movie intended to challenge the idea that everything has already been discovered, that the world has been completely strip-mined of its wonder. If the message comes across as canned and unconvincing, perhaps that’s because director Tim Burton has spent a large part of the last 15 years ghoulishly repackaging some of the most exhausted stories in Western culture — at this point, his involvement in this project is like John Lasseter making a film that lamented the decline of hand-drawn animation, or Zack Snyder making a film that lamented the loss of quality blockbuster entertainment.

Read More: ‘Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children’ Offers Up An Appropriately Strange New Trailer – Watch

Of course, the film — an adaptation of Ransom Riggs’ 2011 Ya novel of the same name — could have been a perfect fit. Burton, much like young protagonist Jake Portman, has been »

- David Ehrlich

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New trailer for Taboo starring Tom Hardy

25 September 2016 11:42 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

A brief new trailer has arrived online for Taboo, a new eight-episode drama from Steven Knight (Peaky Blinders) and Kristoffer Nyholm (The Killing), which sees Tom Hardy leading a cast that also includes Michael Kelly (Everest), Jonathan Pryce (Game of Thrones), Oona Chaplin (Black Mirror), David Hayman (The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas), Jessie Buckley (Shades of Love), Ashley Walters (Bullet Boy), Ed Hog (Anonymous), Leo Bill (Alice in Wonderland), Christopher Fairbank (Guardians of the Galaxy), Richard Dixon (The King’s Speech), and Nicholas Woodeson (The Living and the Dead). Check it out here…

Taboo follows James Keziah Delaney, a man who has been to the ends of the earth and come back irrevocably changed. Believed to be long dead, he returns home to London from Africa in 1814 to inherit what is left of his father’s shipping empire and rebuild a life for himself. But when his father’s »

- Gary Collinson

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The Disney Renaissance’s Little Woman: Katharine Hepburn’s Imprint on Belle

15 September 2016 4:36 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Few questions feel as stale as the following: Is the Disney Princess feminist? It's become profoundly boring to scavenge for an answer, so common is this refrain that arises each holiday season since Peggy Orenstein’s barnstorm of an essay. It will no doubt be a talking point upon the release of Moana later this year. The "Disney Princess" has congealed into a homogenous, lumpen unit of capitalist excess, so much that each character’s particular idiosyncrasies often become obscured in such discussions.Belle, the heroine of Kirk Wise and Gary Trousdale’s Beauty and the Beast (1991), is a headstrong bibliophile with a peripatetic mind; she spends the beginning of the film longing to be elsewhere. “There must be more than this provincial life,” she screams in the film’s opening number, which economically introduces us to the townspeople who fawn over her. Belle, voiced by Paige O’Hara, occupies »

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Danny Elfman Looks Back at Tim Burton’s Cinematic Adventures in Melody

8 September 2016 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

“I wouldn’t have a career were it not for Tim and ‘Pee-wee’s Big Adventure,’” says composer Danny Elfman of his 30-year collaboration with director Tim Burton, who will have his hands and feet immortalized in cement Sept. 8 at the Chinese Theatre. “I went from zero to 90 the day ‘Pee-wee’ was released.”

They have done 16 films together, including the mega-hits “Batman,” “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory” and “Alice in Wonderland,” and the cult favorites “Beetlejuice,” “Edward Scissorhands” and “The Nightmare Before Christmas.” Elfman earned a Grammy for “Batman” and an Oscar nomination for Burton’s “Big Fish.”

“From ‘Pee-wee’ through ‘Nightmare Before Christmas,’ every one of those first six films opened up a new door, artistically and commercially,” Elfman says. “I went from the comedy guy (‘Pee-wee’) to the oddball quirky guy (‘Beetlejuice’) to the big dark film guy (‘Batman’) to the melodic romantic guy (‘Scissorhands’). They were critical doors to walk through. »

- Jon Burlingame

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The 27 greatest stop motion movies of all time

8 September 2016 8:33 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Sean Wilson Sep 16, 2016

With Kubo & The Two Strings now playing, we salute some of our favourite stop motion animated movies...

With Laika's visually sumptuous and breathtaking stop motion masterpiece Kubo And The Two Strings dazzling audiences throughout the country, what better time to celebrate this singular and remarkable art form?

The effect is created when an on-screen character or object is carefully manipulated one frame at a time, leading to an illusion of movement during playback - and such fiendishly intricate work, which takes years of dedication, deserves to be honoured. Here are the greatest examples of stop motion movie mastery.

The Humpty Dumpty Circus (1898)

What defines the elusive appeal of stop motion? Surely a great deal of it is down to the blend of the recognisable and the uncanny: an simulation of recognisably human movement that still has a touch of the fantastical about it. These contradictions were put »

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Shannon Visits Lacma’s Guillermo Del Toro Exhibit!!

7 September 2016 1:24 PM, PDT | iconsoffright.com | See recent Icons of Fright news »

I remember the first time I watched Guillermo Del Toro’s visual masterpiece Pan’S Labyrinth. I sat there in complete awe and wonder at how beautiful the film was, and still is today.  Since then I have been a diehard fan of Del Toro’s work and have been inspired and moved by his creations.  A few months ago it was announced that the Lacma museum in Los Angeles would be hosting an exhibit showcasing not only Del Toro’s impressive horror collection, but also props used from his films along with personal diaries that show his creative process for creating his astonishing creations.

Two weekends ago, I was able to attend Guillermo Del Toro’s: At Home With Monsters exhibit and to say I was blown away would be an understatement.  All throughout the space were some of his most famous movie props which included the Pale Man & Fauno from Pan’S Labyrinth, »

- Shannon McGrew

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The Seven Greatest Director/Actor Combos

4 September 2016 5:47 PM, PDT | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

 Some actors and directors go together like spaghetti and meatballs. They just gel together in a rare way that makes their collaborations special. Here is a list of the seven best parings of director and actor in film history.

 

7: Tim Burton & Johnny Depp:

 Edward Scissorhands; Ed Wood; Sleepy Hollow; Charlie and the Chocolate Factory; Corpse Bride; Sweeney Todd; Alice in Wonderland; Dark Shadows

 Of all the parings on this list, these two make the oddest films. (In a good way.) Tim Burton is one of the most visually imaginative filmmakers of his generation and Johnny Depp was once the polymorphous master of playing a wide variety of eccentric characters. They were a natural combo. Depp made most of his best films with Burton, before his current ‘Jack Sparrow’ period began. The duo had the knack for telling stories about misfits and freaks, yet making them seem sympathetic and likable. »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Rob Young)

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Kubo And The Two Strings review

30 August 2016 6:21 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Ryan Lambie Published Date  Friday, September 2, 2016 - 07:07

When writing about stop motion animated movies, it’s probably customary to bash out a few words about the way CGI has pushed older techniques to the fringes; how the hand-crafted aesthetics of stop-motion no longer seem to reach mass audiences in the way enjoyed by movies like Finding Dory, Minions or Zootropolis, with all their colour and digital slickness.

What’s interesting about animation studio Laika, however, is that it doesn’t stick slavishly to the traditions of stop motion filmmaking. In movies like Coraline, Paranorman and Box Trolls, it’s continually used cutting-edge technology like 3D printing and, yes, CGI to bring its stories to life. This is particularly true in Kubo And The Two Strings, an effervescent action fantasy which reads like an unexpectedly eccentric fusion of Alice In Wonderland and Japanese chanbara movie.

Here, CGI waves splash onto »

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Gene Wilder, ‘Willy Wonka’ Star and Comedic Icon, Dies at 83

29 August 2016 12:22 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Gene Wilder, who regularly stole the show in such comedic gems as “The Producers,” “Blazing Saddles,” “Young Frankenstein,” “Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory” and “Stir Crazy,” died Monday at his home in Stamford, Conn. His nephew Jordan Walker-Pearlman said he died of complications from Alzheimer’s disease. He was 83.

His nephew said in a statement, “We understand for all the emotional and physical challenges this situation presented we have been among the lucky ones — this illness-pirate, unlike in so many cases, never stole his ability to recognize those that were closest to him, nor took command of his central-gentle-life affirming core personality. The decision to wait until this time to disclose his condition wasn’t vanity, but more so that the countless young children that would smile or call out to him “there’s Willy Wonka,” would not have to be then exposed to an adult referencing illness or »

- Richard Natale

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Gene Wilder, ‘Willy Wonka’ Star and Comedic Icon, Dies at 83

29 August 2016 12:22 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Gene Wilder, who regularly stole the show in such comedic gems as “The Producers,” “Blazing Saddles,” “Young Frankenstein,” “Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory” and “Stir Crazy,” died Monday at his home in Stamford, Conn. His nephew Jordan Walker-Pearlman said he died of complications from Alzheimer’s disease. He was 83.

His nephew said in a statement, “We understand for all the emotional and physical challenges this situation presented we have been among the lucky ones — this illness-pirate, unlike in so many cases, never stole his ability to recognize those that were closest to him, nor took command of his central-gentle-life affirming core personality. The decision to wait until this time to disclose his condition wasn’t vanity, but more so that the countless young children that would smile or call out to him “there’s Willy Wonka,” would not have to be then exposed to an adult referencing illness or trouble and causing delight to travel to »

- Richard Natale

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Why ‘Kubo,’ ‘Jungle Book’ and Other Great Kids’ Movies Prove Hollywood Should Treat Adults Like Children

29 August 2016 7:12 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

While the last few months have been pretty dire for moviegoers seeking the large-scale satisfactions that blockbusters can provide, my seven-year-old has had a nearly perfect summer at the movies. From “The Jungle Book” to “Kubo and the Two Strings,” it’s been a great summer to be a kid — or a chaperone.

The summer hasn’t been a total wasteland. As Vulture’s Mark Harris pointed out, movies aimed at older audiences, particularly older women, have been reliable arthouse hits, and audiences who see past the glare of studio marketing campaigns have had plenty to choose from: “Swiss Army Man,” “The Fits,” Don’t Think Twice,” “Love & Friendship” and “Hunt for the Wilderpeople,” to name a few. But there’s a particular itch that only a sweeping spectacle can scratch, and movies like “Suicide Squad,” “X-Men: Apocalypse” and “Ghostbusters” went after that itch with steel wool and a blowtorch. »

- Sam Adams

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Live-Action James And The Giant Peach Movie Eyeing Sam Mendes

26 August 2016 8:58 AM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Now that his tenure overseeing the James Bond franchise is all but over – barring a radical change of heart, of course – writer-director Sam Mendes is beginning to seek pastures anew.

He’ll remain in the realm of high-profile tentpoles, it seems, as Deadline is reporting that the Oscar-winner has entered early talks to direct and develop a new, live-action spin on James and the Giant Peach for Disney.

It’s the latest redo of a previously animated movie to tumble off the conveyor belt over at the House of Mouse, which has found marked success through such crowd-pleasing hits as Alice in Wonderland and Jon Favreau’s The Jungle Book. That streak looks set to continue long into 2017 with the release of Beauty and the Beast, indicating that Disney is likely prepping this James and the Giant Peach overhaul for release in late 2018 or, potentially, 2019.

Whatever the case, should Mendes »

- Michael Briers

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2016 Fall Movie Preview: 17 Blockbusters and Popcorn Offerings To Check Out This Season

18 August 2016 7:30 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

All this week, IndieWire will be rolling out our annual Fall Preview, including offerings that span genres, a close examination of some of the year’s biggest breakouts, all the awards contenders you need to know about now and special attention to all the new movies you need to get through a jam-packed fall movie-going season. Check back every day for a new look at the best the season has to offer, and clear your schedule, because we’re going to fill it right up.

Morgan,” September 2

Stepping out of your father’s shadow is never easy when said father is beloved and successful, but it’s got to be especially difficult when it’s Ridley Scott. Sitting in the director’s chair for his very first feature, Luke Scott looks to bring the kind of white-knuckle tension and mysterious head games to the sci-fi genre as his father has done time and time again. »

- Kate Erbland, Zack Sharf, Steve Greene, David Ehrlich, Graham Winfrey and William Earl

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Pete's Dragon review

16 August 2016 2:59 PM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Mark Harrison Published Date  Wednesday, August 17, 2016 - 05:54

Disney is on a roll this year - following the billion dollar box office success of Jon Favreau's The Jungle Book, their second dip into their back catalogue this year is another belter. Loosely based on the 1977 film of the same name, Pete's Dragon is more independent from its inspiration than any remake for many a year.

There are those who look back fondly on the original, a live action/cel animation hybrid in which Mickey Rooney and Jim Dale gurned at a delightful cartoon dragon, but it's hard to say that it stands up to the likes of similarly designed films like Mary Poppins and Bedknobs & Broomsticks. Nearly four decades on, the most unlikely of directors, David Lowery (Ain't Them Bodies Saints) has taken a trifle and stirred up a moving and majestic remake, transplanting the action from the 1900s »

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Great Job, Internet!: Celebrate Bambi’s 74th anniversary with this look back at its creation

15 August 2016 8:30 AM, PDT | avclub.com | See recent The AV Club news »

Bambi—the iconic Disney animated film responsible for destroying childhood innocence everywhere—celebrated its 74th anniversary on Saturday. Drew Taylor of the website Oh My Disney dug into the production history of the 1942 classic. The film was the fifth feature released by Disney, and Taylor calls it the “synthesis” of the films that came before it: “[It utilizes] the formalism of Pinocchio and Snow White And The Seven Dwarfs, the naturalism of Dumbo, and the gentle experimentalism of Fantasia.”

Based on a 1923 book by Viennese author Felix Salten called Bambi: A Life In The Woods, the Disney animators struggled to figure out how to tell a more amorphous story without a traditional fairy tale structure. The Bambi team wound up sequestered in another building while animators worked on Fantasia, Alice In Wonderland, and Peter Pan in the main studio. And a lengthy production period gave the team time ...

»

- Caroline Siede

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Trends and the Lack of Originality in Hollywood

13 August 2016 7:30 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Eric Bay-Andersen on trends and the lack of originality in Hollywood…

At the beginning of this year I went to the cinema and saw a preview of all the big films coming out in 2016, and it really depressed me because almost every upcoming ‘event’ film was a sequel, a re-boot, or a prequel to the re-imagined spin-off of a TV show adaptation! It’s gotten to the point where I even get disheartened by book adaptations, which is silly I know because there are so many great published stories out there that are worthy of being adapted for the big-screen. I guess I just find it sad that most film-makers these days seem to look to the best-sellers list for their inspiration, rather than their own imagination. I mean, if a new book comes out and is a big success, then of course someone will make it into a film at some point, »

- Amie Cranswick

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Movie Review: Pete’s Dragon

12 August 2016 9:43 PM, PDT | CinemaNerdz | See recent CinemaNerdz news »

Disney has been on a hot streak lately with live adaptations of their classic animated films. Even though it was divisive, Alice in Wonderland can be seen as the one that started this whole trend as it went on to gross over a billion dollars at the worldwide box office. Since then we have gotten last year’s charming (see what I did there) Cinderella, this year’s breathtaking Jungle Book, and next year we’ll get Beauty and the Beast. What makes those films so good (or in Beauty in the Beast’s case, look so good) is that they are able to take a story we are all familiar with and make it feel new and refreshing by making it live action. Neither Cinderella or Jungle Book deviated too far from the source material, but those classic tales receive a breath of fresh air with truly stunning visuals, »

- Scott Davis

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It's lights out for Main Street Electrical Parade at Disney World

12 August 2016 10:57 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

The lights are going out for the Main Street Electrical Parade at Walt Disney World. Disney announced that the nighttime festivity, which has been a mainstay at the Orlando theme park, will draw to a close on October 9, wrapping up a six-year run. After shuttering at the Magic Kingdom, it will head cross country, to Disneyland for what the company is calling a “limited-time encore engagement.” This actually marks the third time the theme park has ended the parade. It first ran from 1977 to 1991. After a nearly eight-year break, it resumed from 1999 to 2001. Its most recent run began in June 2010 (which, at the time, it called a “limited engagement”). The parade itself is a lightbulb filled extravaganza with floats from Alice in Wonderland, Cinderella, and other Disney properties, incorporating a half million lights. The Main Street Electrical Parade ran at Disneyland for 24 years, from 1972 to 1996. »

- David Eckstein

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Not All Sequels Suck

12 August 2016 10:30 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Helen Murdoch with ten sequels that are actually decent…

2016 has been hit and miss for sequels and reboots. So far we’ve had the dull Independence Day: Resurgence, the reboot of Ghostbusters, as well as the forgettable Now You See Me 2 and Bad Neighbours 2. Sitting through the latest Alice in Wonderland film was physically painful and a complete misfire. Whilst it seems that we’re dying for more original material, I thought it was worth reminding everyone that not all sequels are bad. In face some can argue that some sequels are better than the originals.

For the sake of this list and to keep it to a top 10, I’ve excluded the superhero genre so no Marvel or DC love here. I’ve also taken out planned adaptations i.e. Harry Potter, Lord of the Rings, and Jason Bourne.

Comment at the bottom of this article with your favourite sequels. »

- Helen Murdoch

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

1-20 of 366 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


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