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Alice (1988)

A quiet young English girl named Alice finds herself in an alternate version of her own reality after chasing a white rabbit. She becomes surrounded by living inanimate objects and stuffed ... See full summary »

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Credited cast:
Alain Fromager
Denis Manuel
Martin Provost
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A quiet young English girl named Alice finds herself in an alternate version of her own reality after chasing a white rabbit. She becomes surrounded by living inanimate objects and stuffed dead animals, and must find a way out of this nightmare- no matter how twisted or odd that way must be. Written by Derpy Hooves

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1.85 : 1
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Version of Meruhen Meizu (1988) See more »

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An amazing and creepy slice of surrealism.
12 June 2017 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

There were no reviews yet for this film, so I feel obliged to post one. I caught Jan Svankmajer's "Alice" on Netflix recently, and had no idea what to expect. Let me just say: This interpretation of "Alice In Wonderland" is an amazing and dreamlike experience. It is perhaps a bit too creepy for the youngsters, but they won't have the patience for it anyway. For adventurous adults, it's a rewarding and fun slice of surrealism.

This dark Czechoslovakian fantasy-film casts a strange spell. Largely free of dialogue, it loosely follows the familiar outlines of the Lewis Carroll story, depicting Alice's journey through Wonderland as a feast of bizarre perspective-tricks, charmingly creepy stop-motion, and intricate set-design.

The film assumes the viewer's familiarity with Carroll's story, and it uses that familiarity to its advantage as it re-interprets many of the story's most iconic gambits. For instance, rather than crossing paths with a chatty white rabbit in a waistcoat, this film's Alice is stunned to discover a taxidermied rabbit in her room suddenly come to life, pulling the nails from its paws and "bleeding" sawdust as it frees itself from its glass enclosure.

The rabbit then climbs a mountain of rocks, which has somehow appeared in the place of one wall of Alice's room, and it disappears into the drawer of a drawing-table which has appeared there. Alice follows, and after she discovers how to open the drawer, we watch as she -- impossibly -- squeezes inside. The drawer becomes a tunnel, which leads into a dungeon-like stone chamber, where the rabbit is preparing himself a meal in a tiny kitchen.

One sequence leads to the next in exactly the same dreamlike way that Carroll's book proceeds -- but this film's version of events seems considerably more bizarre, if only perhaps because many of the stop- motion creatures have a creepy, threatening look about them.

The film bears some resemblance to the works of the Brothers Quay, whose short films (such as "Street of Crocodiles") famously influenced the look of the music videos made by the band "Tool."

"Alice" is definitely a little on the slow side, but its relentlessly inventive surrealism kept me watching for the duration. I strongly recommend it to anyone who's interested in such dreamlike experiences.


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