7.1/10
25
2 user 2 critic

Tomorrow's Saturday (1962)

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Documentary | Short

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March 2007 (UK)  »

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A natural and flowing snapshot which stands as a brief salute to the communities of the working class of the late 1950's
19 April 2007 | by (United Kingdom) – See all my reviews

Buck up, tomorrow's Saturday. Funny how us working stiffs have said the same thing for decades – a colleague said more or less the same thing to me just the other day! This is where the title comes from as Grigsby starts in the mill but pulls away to focus on the weekend of the working class. Speaking as someone whose employer does four on, four off with 24 hour working, this world is perhaps no longer present in heavy industry but this film did a good job of capturing the way that the weekend is freedom and is a place of release from the working week.

It is very much a part of the Free Cinema school because it does move around the community capturing the real life in such a way that it doesn't feel like there is a camera there. The snapshot of the working classes remains to this day and it is effective as such following the close of work, the running children, the atmosphere of the pub. My favourite shot of the film has to be of the football ground; set up outside all we can see is a floodlight stand but the roar of the crowd is audible and is all the film needs to convey its point.

A good entry in the Free Cinema ideal which stands as a brief salute to the communities of the working class of the late 1950's.


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