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Toronto: Disney Takes Constanza Novick’s ‘The Future Ahead’ in Argentina, Latin America (Exclusive)

Toronto: Disney Takes Constanza Novick’s ‘The Future Ahead’ in Argentina, Latin America (Exclusive)
Disney, one of Argentina’s most decisive movie players, has acquired rights to Argentina and the rest of Latin America to Constanza Novick’s “El futuro que viene” (The Future Ahead), produced by preeminent Argentine director Lisandro Alonso (“Jauja,” “Liverpool”).

Novick’s feature debut, “The Future Ahead” has just had its world premiere at the Toronto Festival, screening in its Discovery section. The Disney deal adds to an international sales agent’s pick-up of world sales rights to “The Future Ahead” by Paris-based Loco Films, announced over the weekend.

The distributor in Argentina of not only its own movies but much of the cream of Argentine titles, many sourced from local production house Patagonik, a Disney joint venture with Argentina’s Artear, Disney will release “The Future Ahead” in Argentina on Oct. 12.

Written by Novick, “The Future Ahead” stars Dolores Fonzi, now firmly established as one of Argentina’s most-reputed actresses after toplining Santiago Mitre’s “Paulina
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Antonio Campos’ Top 10 Films

With his three features — Aftershool, Simon Killer, and, most recently, Christine — director Antonio Campos has crafted a trilogy of tightly controlled character studies that put us in the scarred minds of our protagonists like few other emerging directors. To get a sense of the formative films in his life, as part of his submission to the latest Sight & Sound poll, the director revealed his 10 favorite films.

Including his “favorite film” A Clockwork Orange (as well as another Kubrick feature), there’s also classics from Francis Ford Coppola, Ingmar Bergman, and François Truffaut. Also popping up are films from Michael Haneke and Bruno Dumont, which should be no surprise if you’ve seen one of Campos’ films, and the oldest selection is King Vidor‘s The Crowd, a technically marvelous achievement from the silent era.

Check out this picks below, following a primer quote from his interview with Slant:

I grew up on narrative cinema.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Mar del Plata: LaboLab Unveils Projects From Biazzi, Sotomayor, Alonso

Mar Del Plata — Argentine d.p. Gustavo Biazzi (pictured), the cinematographer on Santiago Mitre’s Cannes Critics’ Week winner “Paulina” as well as Mitre’s debut “The Student” and Rodrigo Moreno’s “Reimon” is aiming to turns his talents to direction with “The Bums,” a coming-of-ager set in the Argentinean exuberant region of Misiones.

Meanwhile, Chilean writer-director-producer Dominga Sotomayor, director of 2014 Rotterdam Tiger winner “Thursday Through Sunday” is set to produce Chilean Felipe Galvez’s “The Settlers,” a historical extinction drama, while in another example of directors-turning-producers multi-awarded Argentine helmer Lisandro Alonso (“Liverpool”) and Ignacio Sarchi will produce “The Future Ahead,” the debut feature of Argentina’s Constanza Novick – the lead screenwriter on Mexican TV show “Soy tu fan,” scribe of Diego Kaplan’s “Sabes nadar?” and art director on Alejandro Agresti’s “Buenos Aires Viceversa.” “Future” is set up at Alonso’s 4L and Sarchi’s 188 Cine production companies.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Jauja | Blu-ray Review

Like each of Lisandro Alonso‘s cinematic offerings that came before – La Libertad, Los Muertos, Fantasma and Liverpool – the Un Certain Regard debuted, Fipresci Prize winning Jauja regards the solitary man facing the exactings of life, nature and the human spirit. But something is quite different here. There seems to be some kind of scripted narrative, lavish costuming and even what many would call a proper movie star in the robustly mustachioed Viggo Mortensen. Yet by embracing these glacial shifts in the filmmaking process itself, Alonso has elevated his art from contemplatively ethnographic to something much more strange, exciting, illusive and illuminating.

For the first time in his career, Alonso parsed out something resembling a working feature length script in partnership with the Argentinian poet Fabián Casas whom he’d worked with previously on untitled Albert Serra addressed short and took on Mortensen as both his leading man producer on the project,
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Interview: Lisandro Alonso On Why Viggo Mortensen Was the Ideal Partner for 'Jauja'

Interview: Lisandro Alonso On Why Viggo Mortensen Was the Ideal Partner for 'Jauja'
In Lisandro Alonso's "Jauja," a Danish explorer (Viggo Mortensen) wanders into mysterious region of the Argentinean desert in search of the eponymous mythical land. In the process, he loses track of his teenage daughter (Viibjork Mallin Agger) as she runs off with one of the officers who has joined them on their journey. Set during some non-specific time in the 19th century, "Jauja" assumes a dreamlike logic as it follows Mortensen on an increasingly expressionistic quest that finds him trapped by the mysteries of his own mind. Read More: 'Jauja' on Criticwire When "Jauja" premiered at the Cannes Film Festival last year, the Argentine director was hardly a fresh name on the circuit, having garnered acclaim for slow-burn narratives including "Liverpool" and "Los Muertos." Nevertheless, "Jauja" marked a new stage of his career, finding him collaborating with a name actor for the first time as well as a co-writer,
See full article at Indiewire »

Notebook Reviews: Lisandro Alonso's "Jauja"

  • MUBI
Now, out in cinema's theatres, and certainly back in the Cannes Film Festival where the Argentine film Jauja premiered, there is a distinct, complacent absence of adventuresome cinema. After a six year wait for director Lisandro Alonso to follow-up his masterpiece 2008 Liverpool, we finally have a new adventure.A fan of Alonso's work knows that his films are literally adventures, travels that are physical, bodily travails pushing through landscape. Jauja, his 19th century tale of a Danish military engineer who sets off into barren Patagonia to search for his runaway daughter, is more of the same, but still radical.Radical for getting Viggo Mortensen to play that engineer, to speak good Danish and stilted Spanish, and to become a body to press upon Alonso's prehistoric landscapes. Radical for its old fashionedness, shot in curved-edge 1.33 on film with sky and ground in frame, with that frame bisected by the horizon, like John Ford compositions.
See full article at MUBI »

Video Interview: Lisandro Alonso & Viggo Mortensen (Jauja)

Lisandro Alonso and Viggo Mortensen are oddly like magnets – figures that on one side might resist one another, yet on the opposite sides naturally embrace one another, working perfectly in tandem toward one common goal in which creation and collaboration naturally flourish. Alonso, being an Argentinian director whose oeuvre almost almost solely constructed of mysterious works (even to the director himself), such as Los Muertos or Liverpool, that follow solitary men along near silent journeys into the harsh wilderness, and Mortensen, a multilingual Danish-American movie star whose reserved every-man persona has been marched on screen from Mordor to Millbrook to great acclaim, yet they share both a deep respect for transcendental cinema and a strikingly admirable lack of pretensions when it comes to their own investment in the medium. Their first collaboration, and Alonso’s first project working with not only a professional actor, but with an actual script (written
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Review: Beautiful, Philosophical, Episodic 'Jauja' Starring Viggo Mortensen

A strikingly shot odyssey that makes extensive use of the dramatic, varied landscapes of rural South America and moves at a pace that would see it quickly outflanked by the average glacier, “Jauja” may involve the talents of the biggest star he’s ever worked with in Viggo Mortensen, but it’s resolutely a Lisandro Alonso film, for better, or if you like watching things happen, largely for worse. We can’t say we’re massive fans of the director’s previous features (2008’s “Liverpool” and 2004’s “Los Muertos” feel like the closest siblings to "Jauja," and both frustrated the hell out of us), but the director has gained a fairly worshipful critical following elsewhere, especially among the “narrative”-is-a-dirty-word brigade. Still, we were hopeful that his tendency for tedium might be mitigated this time out, as the film not only stars an actor we admire, but has a relatively
See full article at The Playlist »

The Noteworthy: 18 March 2015

  • MUBI
We're proud to be partnering up with the Human Rights Watch Film Festival again this year. It opens tonight in London and to celebrate we're currently showing Sara Ishaq's The Mulberry House (pictured above) in the UK—watch it now! the 74th issue of Senses of Cinema is online now, and will keep you busy with a dozen feature articles, not counting festival reports. Start with the Editor's Note and work your way to their focus on Michelangelo Antonioni and Paul Thomas Anderson.Another online journal we're very fond of, desistfilm, has a new issue as well. Among the highlights, Adrian Martin writes on "The Post-Photographic in 1951: A Secret History." The lineup for Hot Docs, the Canadian documentary film festival taking place between April 23rd and May 5th, has been announced and the details can be found here, and trailers for the films (over 80!) can be found here.
See full article at MUBI »

Ten Films to Look For in 2015

Ten Films to Look For in 2015
As the year in moviegoing draws to a close — and as critics busy themselves drawing up lists and handing out awards — it seems time at last to look ahead. Here are the 10 films to get excited about over the year to come. 1. Jauja (Dir. Lisandro Alonso) Revered Argentine filmmaker Lisandro Alonso returns after 2008’s exquisite Liverpool with Jauja, his most astonishing film yet. While no less oblique than its predecessors, Jauja finds Alonso working for the first time with an international star: Viggo Mortensen, an intriguing wrinkle in Alonso’s minimalist approach. Mortensen plays a Danish general adrift in the badlands of 19th-century Patagonia, and his wearying travails form the bulk of the action. A cryptic and f...
See full article at Village Voice »

Nyff: Lisandro Alonso's Jauja Sends Viggo Mortensen to an Earthly Paradise

Nyff:  Lisandro Alonso's Jauja Sends Viggo Mortensen to an Earthly Paradise
Generally speaking, all a viewer needs to do while watching a Lisandro Alonso film is look and listen. Starting with La Libertad (2001), the Argentine director’s features -- the rest of which are Los Muertos (2004), Fantasma (2006), Liverpool (2008), and now Jauja -- have foregone anything resembling conventional, narrative-based filmmaking. Alonso’s recurring subject -- the relationship between people and the landscapes that surround them -- is disarmingly primal, showing non-actors conduct their daily business (La Libertad’s subject is a woodcutter, for instance) in something resembling real-time. Alonso is not interested in backstory or psychology, at least not in the ways these are usually broached and exploited in mainstre...
See full article at Village Voice »

Viggo Mortensen’s Cannes Winner ‘Jauja’ Gets U.S. Distribution

Viggo Mortensen’s Cannes Winner ‘Jauja’ Gets U.S. Distribution
Cinema Guild has bought all U.S. distribution rights to writer-director Lisandro Alonso’s “Jauja,” which is produced by and stars Viggo Mortensen.

Jauja” premiered in Un Certain Regard at the Cannes Film Festival, where it won the Fipresci Award. It’s also an official selection of the Toronto and New York Film Festivals.

Jauja” will open theatrically in early 2015.

The story is set in 1882 at a remote Patagonian military outpost during the a genocidal campaign against the aboriginal population. Mortensen portrays a captain who has come from Denmark with his 15-year-old daughter to take an engineering job with the Argentine army. The daughter falls for a young soldier and they run away together.

All five of Alonso’s films — “Liverpool” (2008), “Fantasma” (2006), “Los Muertos” (2004) and “La Libertad” (2001) — have premiered at Cannes. He has been named this year’s Filmmaker in Residence of the New York Film Festival.

Variety’s Scott Foundas
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Nyff 2014. Main Slate

  • MUBI
Opening Night – World Premiere

Gone Girl

David Fincher, USA, 2014, Dcp, 150m

David Fincher’s film version of Gillian Flynn’s phenomenally successful best seller (adapted by the author) is one wild cinematic ride, a perfectly cast and intensely compressed portrait of a recession-era marriage contained within a devastating depiction of celebrity/media culture, shifting gears as smoothly as a Maserati 250F. Ben Affleck is Nick Dunne, whose wife Amy (Rosamund Pike) goes missing on the day of their fifth anniversary. Neil Patrick Harris is Amy’s old boyfriend Desi, Carrie Coon (who played Honey in Tracy Letts’s acclaimed production of Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?) is Nick’s sister Margo, Kim Dickens (Treme, Friday Night Lights) is Detective Rhonda Boney, and Tyler Perry is Nick’s superstar lawyer Tanner Bolt. At once a grand panoramic vision of middle America, a uniquely disturbing exploration of the fault lines in a marriage,
See full article at MUBI »

Toronto Film Festival Adds Sandler’s ‘Cobbler,’ Wiig’s ‘Welcome to Me,’ Schwarzenegger’s ‘Maggie’ and More

The Toronto International Film Festival added more than 100 features to its 2014 slate today, with pics starring Dustin Hoffman, Kristen Wiig, Benicio del Toro, Diane Keaton, John Travolta, Keira Knightley, Adam Sandler, Jennifer Connelly and Arnold Schwarzenegger among the two-dozen titles joining the Gala and Special Presentations programs.

Contemporary World Cinema adds 51 (22 world preems), City to City shines the spotlight on Seoul with eight pics (two world preems), and Wavelengths delivers 46 titles, including 13 features.

Gala world preems “Boychoir,” which marks the return of Quebec helmer Francois Girard (“Silk”) to the big screen and stars Hoffman as the tough conductor of a world-class music school, as well as Italian multi-hyphenate Andrea Di Stefano’s feature bow “Escobar: Paradise Lost,” starring del Toro as the notorious Colombian drug lord.

Philip Martin’s “The Forger,” starring Travolta and Christopher Plummer in a tale of an artistically gifted petty thief who must aid his ailing father in one last job,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Lima Film Festival 2014 Comes Of Age And Releases Its Full Lineup

Another year, and another edition of the Lima Film Festival is upon us. Just in time for its milestone 18th birthday, the Fest has released their full slate of films, both in the Fiction and Documentary competitions and other sections.Argentina, the biggest film industry in South America, has a couple of highlights. If you've been wondering where Viggo Mortensen has been hiding for the last few years, he can be found in Jauja, a drama from renowned director Lisandro Alonso (Los MuertosLiverpool). There's also the eagerly anticipated Wild Tales, Damián Szifron's dark humoured anthology film.With more and more movies being made here, it's no surprise that Peru has four films in the Fiction Competition. Álvaro Velarde (Destiny Has No Favorites) returns to local screens with...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

The Film Society of Lincoln Center Name Lisandro Alonso as Their Filmmaker in Residence

The Film Society of Lincoln Center Name Lisandro Alonso as Their Filmmaker in Residence
The Film Society of Lincoln Center and Jaeger-LeCoultre revealed award-winning Argentine filmmaker Lisandro Alonso as their 2014 Filmmaker in Residence. The announcement took place last night at a dinner in New York co-hosted by Charles Finch, Lesli Klainberg, Bennett Miller, Todd Solondz, and Lisa Cortes. Last year the role was held by director Andrea Arnold ("Fish Tank," "Wuthering Heights"), who utilized the post to develop her next film "American Honey" and work within the local community, speaking at New York Film Festival panels and nearby high schools. Read More: Here's Why This Was the Best Cannes Film Festival in Years Alonso's work had been described as minimalist comparable to Tarkovsky blending documentary and film. Alonso has directed five features, including "La Libertad" (2001), "Los Muertos" (2004), "Fantasma" (2006), and "Liverpool" (2008). This year he debuted his most recent,...
See full article at Indiewire »

Lisandro Alonso Named Lincoln Center Filmmaker in Residence

Lisandro Alonso Named Lincoln Center Filmmaker in Residence
Argentine director Lisandro Alonso will be the Film Society of Lincoln Center and Jaeger-LeCoultre’s 2014 Filmmaker in Residence.

A minimalist filmmaker whose narrative work has a documentary-like aesthetic, Alonso’s most recent film was “Jauja” with Viggo Mortensen, which was nominated for the Un Certain Regard Award at this year’s Cannes Film Festival.

“Many times I think less is more,” Alonso told Variety. “It makes for a nice contrast to many big U.S. films.”

His other films include “La Libertad,” “Los Muertos,” “Fantasma,” and “Liverpool” — all of which premiered at the Cannes Film Festival.

Alonso told Variety that he plans to use his residency to develop his next project, an exploration of people who live (and search for gold) in the Amazon jungle environment.

“I’m thinking about what kind of film can I make [in Brazil] about people who live outside of civilization and society and all these kinds of structures that we have,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Review: Viggo Mortensen is lost in the wilderness of the impenetrable 'Jauja'

  • Hitfix
Review: Viggo Mortensen is lost in the wilderness of the impenetrable 'Jauja'
Cannes - "Did you see the Lisandro Alonso?!" came the eager text from a friend not in Cannes, mere minutes after I had, indeed, seen Alonso's "Jauja" -- an Argentine western turned existential comedy turned, well, any number of alternate-dimension subgenres. I  envied him his excitement. Alonso has built up a fiercely devoted band of admirers with his opaque brand of slow-cinema puzzle picture, as demonstrated in the likes of "Liverpool" and "Los Muertos"; for those of us who have never gained access to that club, "Jauja" is unlikely to bring us much closer. Intermittently playful, consistently confounding, finally petrified, it's a film of fussy, cultivated austerity; Alonsolytes will debate what it's hiding, while others will suggest "an actual movie" as the answer. Initially, improbably, it seems that we're in for more hand-holding than usual from Alonso, as proceedings open with a lengthy block of text that helpfully gives context
See full article at Hitfix »

Cannes Review: Lisandro Alonso’s Beautiful But Belabored ‘Jauja’ Starring Viggo Mortensen

A strikingly shot odyssey story that makes extensive use of the dramatic, varied landscapes of rural South America and moves at a pace that would see it quickly outflanked by the average glacier, “Jauja” may involve the talents of the biggest star he’s ever worked with in Viggo Mortensen, but it’s resolutely a Lisandro Alonso film, for better, or if you like watching things happen, largely for worse. We can’t say we’re massive fans of the director’s previous features (2008’s “Liverpool” and 2004’s “Los Muertos” feel like the closest siblings to "Jauja," and both frustrated the hell out of us), but the director has gained a fairly worshipful critical following elsewhere, especially among the “narrative”-is-a-dirty-word brigade. Still, we were hopeful that his tendency for tedium might be mitigated this time out, as the film not only stars an actor we admire, but has a relatively rich logline,
See full article at The Playlist »

Match Factory unveils Cannes slate

  • ScreenDaily
Match Factory unveils Cannes slate
Exclusive: Leading art house sales outfit The Match Factory has revealed details of its packed Cannes slate.

Among the titles the Cologne-based company is presenting on the Croisette are three films in Official Selection.

Alice Rohrwacher ́s second feature, Le Meraviglie is screening in Competition.The film’s cast includes Monica Bellucci.

Rohrwacher, whose Corpo Celeste screened in the Directors’ Fortnight in 2011, worked on the new feature with her regular producer, Carlo Cresto-Dina (Tempesta) in co-production with Switzerland (Amka Films Productions) and Germany (Pola Pandora).

The Match Factory is also handling Snow in Paradise, the first feature film by renowned UK editor, Andrew Hulme. The film is screening in Un Certain Regard.

The film is based on the true story of Martin Askew who grew up in a crime-riddled east end of London in a culture of violence.

The sales outfit is also representing Cannes regular Kornél Mundruczó’s White God, which will play
See full article at ScreenDaily »
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