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10 items from 2017


Dear Hollywood: 9 Top Women Cinematographers Who Are Ready to Direct

10 May 2017 7:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Here’s how studios say they see it: Sure, we really want to hire women directors. But there’s almost no studio movie that isn’t big budget, and we can’t find women who have the experience necessary to handle the really big movies. (Never mind Colin Trevorrow. Or Marc Webb. Or Gareth Edwards. Or Jon Watts.)

Of course, that logic is a vicious cycle at best, but here’s a chance to break it. Director Reed Morano’s dazzling execution of the first three episodes of Hulu’s “The Handmaid’s Tale” suggests another excellent source for future women directors: top cinematographers.

Read More: 7 Female Genre Filmmakers You Should Get to Know Right Now

Women cinematographers work harder, longer, and have to be gifted and tough in order to keep landing jobs. As a cinematographer, make one mistake and you’re through. Any working cinematographer has more than »

- Anne Thompson

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Dear Hollywood: 9 Top Women Cinematographers Who Are Ready to Direct

10 May 2017 7:00 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Here’s how studios say they see it: Sure, we really want to hire women directors. But there’s almost no studio movie that isn’t big budget, and we can’t find women who have the experience necessary to handle the really big movies. (Never mind Colin Trevorrow. Or Marc Webb. Or Gareth Edwards. Or Jon Watts.)

Of course, that logic is a vicious cycle at best, but here’s a chance to break it. Director Reed Morano’s dazzling execution of the first three episodes of Hulu’s “The Handmaid’s Tale” suggests another excellent source for future women directors: top cinematographers.

Read More: 7 Female Genre Filmmakers You Should Get to Know Right Now

Women cinematographers work harder, longer, and have to be gifted and tough in order to keep landing jobs. As a cinematographer, make one mistake and you’re through. Any working cinematographer has more than »

- Anne Thompson

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Diane Lane to Star in Reed Morano’s Next Film

9 May 2017 12:01 PM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Diane Lane in “Paris Can Wait

Hot off rave reviews for directing the first three episodes of Hulu’s “The Handmaid’s Tale,” Reed Morano has announced her next project. A press release revealed that the Indie Spirit Award nominee will helm an untitled drama starring Diane Lane and Jeff Bridges. The project is being developed by Bankside Films.

Scheduled to shoot in Boston this October, the film centers on a narcissistic virtuoso violinist (Bridges) who is forced to move back in with his estranged wife (Lane) after he’s diagnosed with a life-threatening illness. “As they attempt to learn how to live with each other again, he experiences a profound change in his behavior which compels him to learn to connect with the music and the people that surround him in astonishing and unexpected ways,” the press release summarizes. The project, penned by Stuart Blumberg (“The Kids Are All Right”), will be presented to buyers at Cannes later this month.

Emjag ProductionsAlexandra Milchan (“The Wolf of Wall Street”) is among the film’s producers.

“The project has brought together some of Hollywood’s most exciting talent to tell an intensely moving story in a unique, refreshing, and dynamic way,” said Bankside FilmsStephen Kelliher. “We could not be more excited to be working with such a prestigious team and to be working with our co-producers Emjag Productions to bring this very special story to the world.”

Lane added, “This is a wonderful story. I’m thrilled to have Reed behind the camera as our director and appreciate her keen eye and talent thanks to her previous work as a cinematographer.”

Morano is an acclaimed cinematographer whose credits include “Beyoncé: Lemonade” and “Frozen River.” She was nominated for an Independent Spirit Award for her cinematography in “Meadowland,” her 2015 directorial debut starring Olivia Wilde. Morano is currently filming “I Think We’re Alone Now,” a post-apocalyptic movie toplined by Elle Fanning. She’s also signed on to direct the Ellen Page-starrer “Lioness,” a drama about a Lance Corporal Leslie Martz, the Marine who led the first Female Engagement Team in Afghanistan.

You can catch Lane in Eleanor Coppola’s “Paris Can Wait” later this week. The romantic comedy hits theaters May 12.

Diane Lane to Star in Reed Morano’s Next Film was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Laura Berger

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Why Billionaire Charles Cohen Believes He Can Save the Riskiest Indie Films

11 April 2017 11:06 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

In the annals of rich men who look to Hollywood to build a secondary empire, real estate billionaire Charles S. Cohen (Forbes net worth: $2.2 billion) is their Don Quixote. His Cohen Media Group is staking its claim in spaces renowned for their allergies to profit: He’s restoring classic films, releasing foreign-language titles, and moving into specialty exhibition.

One Oscar campaigner calls Cohen’s taste “older middle-of-the-road arthouse,” and that’s exactly the audience he wants. Three of Cohen’s French imports — “Outside the Law” (2010), “Timbuktu” (2014) and “Mustang” (2015) — received foreign-language Academy Award nominations. This year, Cohen (with partner Amazon Studios) took Iranian Cannes-prize-winner Asghar Farhadi’s “The Salesman” all the way to the Oscar, much to the chagrin of established competitors Sony Pictures Classics (“Toni Erdmann”) and Music Box (“A Man Called Ove”).

However, where other billionaire businessmen have wanted to be studio moguls, or Harvey Weinstein, what Cohen really »

- Anne Thompson

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Why Billionaire Charles Cohen Believes He Can Save the Riskiest Indie Films

11 April 2017 11:06 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

In the annals of rich men who look to Hollywood to build a secondary empire, real estate billionaire Charles S. Cohen (Forbes net worth: $2.2 billion) is their Don Quixote. His Cohen Media Group is staking its claim in spaces renowned for their allergies to profit: He’s restoring classic films, releasing foreign-language titles, and moving into specialty exhibition.

One Oscar campaigner calls Cohen’s taste “older middle-of-the-road arthouse,” and that’s exactly the audience he wants. Three of Cohen’s French imports — “Outside the Law” (2010), “Timbuktu” (2014) and “Mustang” (2015) — received foreign-language Academy Award nominations. This year, Cohen (with partner Amazon Studios) took Iranian Cannes-prize-winner Asghar Farhadi’s “The Salesman” all the way to the Oscar, much to the chagrin of established competitors Sony Pictures Classics (“Toni Erdmann”) and Music Box (“A Man Called Ove”).

However, where other billionaire businessmen have wanted to be studio moguls, or Harvey Weinstein, what Cohen really »

- Anne Thompson

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Interview: Melissa Leo on Playing 'The Most Hated Woman in America'

22 March 2017 12:54 PM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

By Jose Solís 

Few actors can command the screen like Melissa Leo. She has cemented her status as a true scene stealing chameleon in films like The Fighter, Frozen River, Mildred Pierce, and The Big Short. And while she’s mostly regarded as a character, read supporting, actor, she gets a chance to show off her leading lady chops in The Most Hated Woman in America which debuts this week on Netflix. She plays atheist activist Madalyn Murray O’Hair who led a campaign that banned Bible readings in public schools.

Leo infuses the part with heart and courage, so that she becomes a perfect embodiment of the notion that the personal should be political. Director Tommy O’Haver uses Madalyn’s kidnapping and horrific murder, to frame a film that aims to reach everyone’s humanity, regardless of their religious beliefs. Anchored by Leo’s majestic performance, it becomes »

- Jose

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Trailer Watch: Melissa Leo Is an Atheist with a Cause in “Most Hated Woman in America”

16 March 2017 1:02 PM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

“Most Hated Woman in America”

Christopher Hitchens, Sam Harris, Richard Dawkins — these are the names most closely associated with atheism in the United States. But this wasn’t always the case. It was in fact a woman who founded “American Atheists,” an influential organization dedicated to defending the civil liberties of atheists and the separation of church and state. Described as “the most hated woman in America” by Life magazine, Madalyn Murray O’Hair’s story is brought to life by Melissa Leo in a new Netflix film, for which a trailer has just been released.

“What the hell is going on in here?” Murray O’Hair (Leo) asks as she bursts into her son’s classroom after hearing the children and their teacher recite The Lord’s Prayer. “In the constitution, there’s something called the First Amendment. The school board cannot force my son to pray — or anyone else,” she tells the class. When the teacher glibly suggests that Murray O’Hair sue the school board, she decides to do just that.

Rather than focus on the landmark court cast that followed, the true-crime biopic depicts Murray O’Hair’s disappearance, which occurred in 1995, more than 20 years after a Supreme Court ruling put an official end to Bible-reading in American public schools.

“Most Hated Woman in America’ captures the rise and fall of a complex character who was a controversial villain to some and an unlikely hero to others,” Netflix’s summary reads. The film co-stars Juno Temple (“Vinyl”), Adam Scott (“Parks and Recreation”), Vincent Kartheiser (“Mad Men”), and Josh Lucas (“The Mysteries of Laura”).

Leo won an Oscar in 2011 for her supporting role in David O. Russell’s “The Fighter,” and received a nod in 2009 for her leading role in Courtney Hunt’s “Frozen River.” Her recent credits include Oliver Stone’s “Snowden,” “Wayward Pines,” and Margaret Betts’ “Novitiate,” which premiered at Sundance in January.

Directed by Tommy O’Haver (“United States of Tara,” “Ella Enchanted”) and written by O’Haver and Irene Turner (“An American Crime”), “Most Hated Woman in America” hits Netflix March 24.

https://medium.com/media/4216a4c527de2ce3aa230168d33750a6/href

Trailer Watch: Melissa Leo Is an Atheist with a Cause in “Most Hated Woman in America” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Laura Berger

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Sun Valley Film Festival Slides Into Its Sixth Year

15 March 2017 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Heading into its sixth year, the Sun Valley Film Festival is a perfect confluence of everything one could possibly want in a celebration of cinema: compelling, thought-provoking movies, a snowy resort town filled with pristine ski runs, and whiskey-soaked saloons redolent of the Wild West. Add to that a relaxed crowd of Hollywood players, Idaho locals, and an eclectic batch of writers, directors, and cineastes.

The five-day fest will screen more than 30 films, including 14 narrative features and 16 documentaries, Rory Kennedy’s “Take Every Wave: The Life of Laird Hamilton” among them. Also unspooling are several films that bowed at this year’s Sundance fest, including Michelle Morgan’s comedy “L.A. Times” starring Dree Hemingway.

The world premiere of “Blood Road,” a documentary starring Sun Valley-based endurance athlete Rebecca Rusch, will open the fest. Charles Randolph (“The Big Short”) will host this year’s Screenwriters Lab. The winner of the High Scribe screenwriting contest, »

- Malina Saval

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Sundance ’17 and on to Rotterdam ‘17: Interview with Kirsten Tan, Writer and Director of ‘Pop Aye’

7 February 2017 10:35 AM, PST | Sydney's Buzz | See recent Sydney's Buzz news »

This first feature of Kirsten Tan premiered in Sundance ‘17 World Cinema Dramatic Competition. Its provenance is Singapore but it takes place in Thailand. It continued onward to the Hivos Tiger Competition at Iffr (R’dam).

The thrill of interviewing here in Sundance is that you see a film; you have an impression and while it is still fresh you meet the filmmakers without having much time for any research or reflection. And then you get to see them again as “old friends” when you meet again in Rotterdam.

As Kirsten, her producer Weijie Lai and I sat down at the Sundance Co-op on Main Street here in Park City, I really had little idea of where the interview would take us, somewhat analogously to her film in which an architect, disenchanted with life in general, being put aside as “old” in his own highly successful architectural firm and in a stale relationship with his wife, »

- Sydney Levine

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Sundance 2017: Al Gore’s Documentary Officially Titled ‘An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power’

11 January 2017 10:24 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Al Gore’s follow-up to 2006’s “An Inconvenient Truth” now has an official title: “An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power.” Participant Media had yet to settle on a final title upon announcing the movie’s inclusion in the Sundance Film Festival line up last month.

Read More: Sundance 2017: Check Out the Full Lineup, Including Competition Titles, Premieres and Shorts

An Inconvenient Sequel” is one of the very first screenings at Sundance this year, showing at 5:30 on Thursday, January 19 with the former Vice President scheduled to attend.

Like the original film, which won the Oscar for Best Documentary and was directed by Davis Guggenhiem, the documentary will focus on the climate crisis, but instead of relying heavily on Gore’s slide presentation, the film follows Gore as he travels the world to discuss climate change. Paramount Pictures is distributing the film.

The sequel is directed by Bonni Cohen and Jon Shenk, »

- Graham Winfrey

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

10 items from 2017


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