Doctor Who (2005– )
7.8/10
4,062
15 user 6 critic

The Shakespeare Code 

The Doctor takes Martha to London in 1599, where William Shakespeare's new play is being used by three witches in an evil plan.

Director:

(as Charles Palmer)

Writer:

Reviews

Watch Now

With Prime Video

WATCH NOW
ON TV
ON DISC
ALL

Photos

Edit

Cast

Episode complete credited cast:
...
...
...
...
Sam Marks ...
Wiggins
Amanda Lawrence ...
Doomfinger
...
Bloodtide
Jalaal Hartley ...
Dick
...
Kempe
...
Dolly Bailey
...
...
Jailer
...
Peter Streete
Robert Demeger ...
...
Edit

Storyline

As The Doctor and Martha travel for the first time together in the TARDIS, they land unexpectedly in 1599 Tudor London, where the world is under threat from the evil Carronites, and only history's most notorious playwright William Shakespeare can help to save the world Written by Anon

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis


Certificate:

TV-PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

7 April 2007 (UK)  »

Company Credits

Show more on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (50 episodes)

Sound Mix:

(Dolby 5.1)

Color:

See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Lilith was named after a storm demon in Mesopotamian mythology who is also mentioned in Judeo-Christian tradition. See more »

Goofs

When the Doctor witnesses Lynley die - of a psychic attack that causes him to drown on dry land, his lungs full of water - he declares that he has never seen anything like it. In fact, the Doctor has seen a death almost exactly like it in the 1971 serial "The Mind of Evil", in which the victim was, likewise, found dead in a dry room, his lungs full of water. (On a side note, this was the first time this version of the Doctor had seen anything like it.) See more »

Quotes

Martha Jones: So, magic and stuff? It's a surprise, it's all a bit Harry Potter.
The Doctor: Wait till you read book 7. Oh, I cried.
See more »


Soundtracks

Doctor Who Theme
(uncredited)
Written by Ron Grainer
Arranged by Murray Gold
Performed by BBC National Orchestra of Wales
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more (Spoiler Alert!) »

User Reviews

 
More than a bit childish and not well researched...
26 January 2014 | by See all my reviews

I'm certainly no Shakespeare snob, but you'd think that a bunch of British writers (as much as they like to shove The Bard in everyone's face) would be more well versed in his writings than this. How many times do we have to hear snippets of Shakespeare's lines spoken in everyday conversations, with Shakespeare suddenly saying, "Ooo...that's good. I think I'll use that" before it becomes hackneyed? Answer...once. As an example, The Doctor says, "The play's the thing!", then tells Shakespeare he can use it. Why? Without the surrounding context from Hamlet, it's not a pithy line, and makes no sense. The full line is, "The play's the thing, wherein I'll catch the conscience of the King!" It refers to Hamlet's sudden realization that he can use a troupe of actors to play out his uncle's assassination of his father (the King) in order to guilt the former into some sort of admission of guilt. The single line, "The play's the thing" has no value in poetry, and makes no sense without the rest of the scene and the characters. It's like saying, "I have a dream" to Martin Luther King, Jr., and then telling him he can use that line. Without the rest of the speech, it's not very impressive.

This happens over and over in the episode, making me think that none of these writers has ever actually seen (or understood) a Shakespeare play. Pretty embarrassing, and not worthy of a show with such a huge, devoted following.


3 of 10 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?
Review this title | See all 15 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

Watch the Latest Episode of "The IMDb Show"

Katee Sackhoff talks about her characters on "Battlestar Galactica," "Star Wars: Rebels," and "The Flash." Plus, "The IMDb Show" learns what it takes to wield a lightsaber.

Watch the show