Elegy (2008) - News Poster

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Nicholas Meyer To Appear At "Star Trek II: The Wrath Of Khan" 35Th Anniversary Screening In L.A., May 31

  • CinemaRetro
By Todd Garbarini

Arguably the best Star Trek film ever made, Nicholas Meyer’s Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (1982), which was originally subtitled The Vengeance of Khan but was changed so as not to interfere with Richard Marquand’s Revenge of the Jedi which itself was changed to Return of the Jedi, celebrates its 35th anniversary this year and is the subject of an exclusive screening at Laemmle’s Ahrya Fine Arts Theatre. The 113-minute film, which stars William Shatner and the crew of the Enterprise, will be screened on Wednesday, May 31, 2017 at 7:30 pm on Digital Cinema Projection (Dcp).

Please Note: Director Nicholas Meyer is scheduled to appear in person for a Q & A following the screening.

From the press release:

Star Trek II: The Wrath Of Khan

(35th Anniversary Screening)

Wednesday, May 31, at 7:30 Pm at the Ahrya Fine Arts Theatre

Followed by Q&A with
See full article at CinemaRetro »

The Rocky History of Philip Roth Novels Being Adapted to the Big Screen

Philip Roth (Courtesy: Eric Thayer/Reuters

By: Carson Blackwelder

Managing Editor

When it comes to acclaimed American authors, Philip Roth is right up there with the best of them—so it shouldn’t come as a surprise that his work has been translated from page to screen numerous times and to varying degrees of success.

Over the years, seven of the novelist’s books have been adapted to the big screen—with two of them coming out in 2016 alone: Indignation and American Pastoral. Before that, though, there was Goodbye, Columbus, Portnoy’s Complaint, The Human Stain, Elegy (based on The Dying Animal), and The Humbling.

Goodbye, Columbus (1969)—which starred Ali MacGraw and Richard Benjamin—earned Arnold Schulman a nomination for best adapted screenplay and was generally well-received by critics and did quite well at the box office.

Portnoy’s Complaint (1972)—which was adapted by Ernest Lehman—didn’t fare that
See full article at Scott Feinberg »

Ewan McGregor’s ‘American Pastoral’ Gets October Release

Ewan McGregor’s ‘American Pastoral’ Gets October Release
Lionsgate has set an awards-season date of Oct. 21 for a limited release of its drama “American Pastoral,” with Ewan McGregor starring and making his feature directorial debut.

The studio will expand the run a week later. The cast includes Uzo Aduba, David Strathairn, Jennifer Connelly, Rupert Evans, Peter Riegert and Dakota Fanning.

Lakeshore toppers Tom Rosenberg and Gary Lucchesi are producing along with Andre Lamal. John Romano adopted Philip Roth’s novel, which was published in 1997.

American Pastoral” follows Seymour “Swede” Levov, a legendary high school athlete, who grows up to marry a former beauty queen and inherits his father’s business. His seemingly perfect life shatters when his daughter rebels by committing a deadly act of terrorism during the Vietnam War.

The book, published in 1997, is the first novel in Roth’s American postwar trilogy, followed by “I Married a Communist” and “The Human Stain.” Lakeshore has produced two
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Review: Indignation (Sundance)

  • JoBlo
Plot: A Jewish boy (Logan Lerman) attending a Wasp-y university on a scholarship, falls for a beautiful, sexually provocative classmate (Sarah Gadon). Review: Novelist Philip Roth is generally considered to be the hardest author to adapt to films. While screenwriter Nicholas Mayer gave it his best shot with The Human Stain and Elegy, the books are probably too specific to their form to make for good movies.... Read More...
See full article at JoBlo »

Uzo Aduba, David Strathairn Join Ewan McGregor’s ‘American Pastoral’

Uzo Aduba, David Strathairn Join Ewan McGregor’s ‘American Pastoral’
Lakeshore Entertainment has added David Strathairn, Peter Riegert, “Orange Is the New Black” star Uzo Aduba and Valorie Curry to the cast of “American Pastoral,” with Ewan McGregor directing and starring.

Jennifer Connelly and Dakota Fanning have been previously announced as the female leads. McGregor will direct from John Romano’s adaptation of the Philip Roth novel, with filming scheduled for later this month in Pittsburgh, Pa.

Lakehore toppers Tom Rosenberg and Gary Lucchesi are producing.

The story follows Seymour “Swede” Levov, a legendary high school athlete who grows up to marry a former beauty queen and inherits his father’s business. His perfect life shatters when his daughter rebels by becoming a revolutionary and committing a deadly act of political terrorism during the Vietnam War.

Lakeshore first attempted to develop “Pastoral” in 2003, picking it up when Paramount’s option lapsed. In 2012, it attached Fisher Stevens to direct and had Sidney Kimmel co-financing.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Learning to Drive’ Offers Meaty Roles for Women In Front of and Behind the Camera

‘Learning to Drive’ Offers Meaty Roles for Women In Front of and Behind the Camera
Learning to Drive” is a women’s movie in the truest sense of the phrase.

Yes, the story of a middle-age divorcee’s unlikely bond with her driving instructor is firmly pitched at women of a certain age, but the term applies to more than its target audience. Both in front of and behind the camera, it is a picture made for women, by women and about women. In an industry that is still woefully behind the times when it comes to gender diversity, it’s a welcome corrective, but the decade-plus battle to make “Learning to Drive” also reveals the obstacles female filmmakers face.

“One of the biggest struggles we had was that most of the financing is male-oriented,” said producer Dana Friedman. “It was a drama, it wasn’t an action film, it wasn’t a thriller and it starred a woman. Getting a financier to understand the
See full article at Variety - Film News »

'Learning to Drive' – A Conversation with Director Isabel Coixet, and Actors Patricia Clarkson & Sarita Choudhury

I recently sat down with director Isabel Coixet, and actors Patricia Clarkson and Sarita Choudhury at the Crosby Hotel in New York City, to discuss their new film "Learning to Drive." The film, written by Sarah Kernochan, is based on the autobiographical New Yorker short story by Katha Pollit, a long-time political columnist for the Nation.

Wendy is a fiery Manhattan author whose husband has just left her for a younger woman; Darwan is a soft-spoken taxi driver from India on the verge of an arranged marriage. As Wendy sets out to reclaim her independence, she runs into a barrier common to many lifelong New Yorkers: she’s never learned to drive. When Wendy hires Darwan to teach her, her unraveling life and his calm restraint seem like an awkward fit. But as he shows her how to take control of the wheel, and she coaches him on how to impress a woman, their unlikely friendship awakens them to the joy, humor, and love in starting life anew.

My conversation began with Isabel Coixet and Sarita Choudhury

Isabel Coixet’s award-winning film credits include "Demaisiado viejo para morir joven," "Things I Never Told You,""My Life Without Me," "The Secret Life of Words," "Paris, je t’aime," "Elegy," "Map of the Sounds of Tokyo," "Yesterday Never Ends," "Another Me," "Nobody Wants the Night," as well as documentaries, including "Invisibles."

Currently, Sarita Choudhury can be seen on Showtime’s "Homeland." Her film credits include "Admission," "Gayby," "Midnight’s Children," "Generation Um…," "Entre Nos," "The Accidental Husband," "Lady in the Water," "The War Within," "Mississippi Masala," "Kama Sutra: A Tale of Love," "She Hate Me," "Just a Kiss," "Wild West," "High Art," "The House of the Spirits," "Gloria," and "A Perfect Murder."

Susan Kouguell: Tell me about the process of how "Learning to Drive" came about.

Isabel Coixet: We started talking about making this film with Patricia and Ben Kingsley when we were making "Elegy" (directed by Coixet, starring Clarkson and Kingsley) and we got along very well and we wanted to make another film together. Patricia discovered the short story by Katha Pollit, and she gave it to me and I thought it was wonderful. And then we got the screenwriter Sarah Kernocha involved. The film is a comedy but not a classical comedy. It was a very difficult film to pitch because you know financiers and producers want something they can put in one box and you can’t with this film. It was a long process. It took nine years.

Some Words Unspoken and the Intimacy of the Camera

Isabel Coixet: There is always this romantic feeling underneath [subtext], I think there is that possibility. You have to be true to your words. If they are true, you will have to stick to your words.

Sarita Choudhury: That’s what happens with people you meet. No you were my inspiration don’t make me your inspiration.

Isabel Coixet: I love Henry James. There is a possibility of romance in the air. My romantic side is always excited when I see something like this.

Sarita Choudhury: I had so few words in the film. In a way, I kept the words because I had to know not to say them. For us the script -- the situational was also in the script; the languidness. It was because Isabel holds the camera. There was a pace created to it. When you’re acting you can feel where the camera is, but when the camera is at the end of Isabel’s hand and she’s moving it, it almost creates an intimacy between you and the camera, and you and the actor. There’s a pace you normally don’t get in film. You didn’t know when she was on your face; you had to keep acting like acting in the theatre.

On The Lack of Women Directors

Isabel Coixet: There are so many articles about it. I’m always afraid to play the victim, to complain too much. I know there is an inequity with men and women directors. This is an issue in the world. I always say, (Coixet smiles) we have to ask for more salary to make up for all these years and maybe if we ask for more they’ll give us the same as a man.

I want to put my words where my mouth is by producing female directors; they are amazing talented people. I’m producing three short films and a feature documentary. That’s what I do.

Sarita Choudhury: I just did a young woman’s short film; there is something about her that’s brilliant. I’ve done two short films. I can’t change the caste system and I can’t do the voluntary work I need to be doing. Film is no different from the world, like Isabel said. That’s our work, to get every woman involved. And if a man is brilliant, let him in too.

I then asked Patricia Clarkson about her involvement with "Learning to Drive."

Academy Award® nominee and Emmy Award-winning actress, Patricia Clarkson, has worked extensively in independent films. The National Board of Review and the National Society of Film Critics named her Best Supporting Actress of the Year for "Pieces of April" and "The Station Agent." Her many film credits include "The Maze Runner," "Last Weekend," "Friends With Benefits," "One Day," "Easy A," "Shutter Island," "Vicky Christina Barcelona," "Elegy," "No Reservations," "All the Kings’ Men," "Lars and the Real Girl, and "Good Night, and Good Luck."

Susan Kouguell: What attracted you to the project?

Patricia Clarkson: I loved the Katha Pollit story in The New Yorker; it serendipitously came to me. I love Wendy, I love this character. I was nine years younger at the time, but I still felt I knew her. I was relentless trying to get this film made with producer Dana Friedman. I found it an equal dose of funny and tragic. I liked the almost commedia dell'arte aspect; this absurd situation and finding the tragic comedy. A woman who is brilliant who lives a great life -- she has everything, but “forgets to look up,” and then meets a man who has experienced tragic loss. They have disparate worlds. I found it a quintessential New York story, but it’s also universal. It’s an independent film, but it’s not independently-minded.

Some Final Words

The disparate worlds about which Clarkson refers to in regard to her character, Wendy’s relationship with Darwan [Ben Kingsley] -- the life of a financially successful New Yorker compared to the immigrant’s struggle, was a thematic element that I further discussed with Coixet and Choudhury. As Choudhury said to me, Coixet’s visual choices of her character, such as the moment when she watches feet walk by her basement apartment window, feeling trapped, underscore the poignancy of this fish-out-of-water situation. Coixet captures these elements with a delicate balance of both drama and comedy.

It was an inspiring morning to speak with these three powerful and talented women, who are committed to sharing their knowledge with the next generation of female filmmakers.

Award-winning screenwriter and filmmaker, Susan Kouguell teaches screenwriting at Purchase College Suny, and presents international seminars on screenwriting and film. Author of Savvy Characters Sell Screenplays! and The Savvy Screenwriter, she is chairperson of Su-City Pictures East, LLC, a consulting company founded in 1990 where she works with writers, filmmakers, and executives worldwide. www.su-city-pictures.com, http://su-city-pictures.com/wpblog
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

Watch Ben Kingsley teach Patricia Clarkson to drive in this exclusive featurette

  • Hitfix
Watch Ben Kingsley teach Patricia Clarkson to drive in this exclusive featurette
Sir Ben Kingsley is a master actor, and his co-stars know it. Patricia Clarkson and others in new film “Learning to Drive” describe the “sublime” experience of working with Kingsley in the HitFix exclusive featurette you can watch above. “Learning to Drive” premiered at last year’s Toronto International Film Festival, where it was the first runner-up for the Audience Award. Clarkson stars as Wendy, a woman whose husband has just left her for a younger woman. As a lifelong New Yorker, Wendy has never learned to drive, so to reclaim her independence, she takes driving lessons from Darwan (Kingsley), a taxi driver from India on the verge of an arranged marriage. An unlikely friendship forms between fiery Wendy and soft-spoken Darwan. The film reunites Clarkson, Kingsley and director Isabel Coixet — the three of them worked together on 2008’s “Elegy.” “Learning to Drive” opens in theaters today.
See full article at Hitfix »

Ben Kingsley teaches Patricia Clarkson to drive in ‘Learning to Drive’ trailer

Director Isabel Coixet’s (Elegy, Paris, je t’aime) latest film Learning to Drive brings the feel good vibes in its first trailer with Patricia Clarkson and Ben Kingsley (who worked with Coixet in Elegy). Clarkson stars as a writer going through marital issues who decides to finally take driving lessons from Ben Kingsley’s character. Set in Manhattan, the trailer suggests a feel-good story that has genuine heart and funny moments. Here’s the synopsis:

Wendy (Patrician Clarkson), a self-absorbed New York book critic, is shocked to reality by the sudden end of her marriage. Always dependent on her husband for driving, she must now learn to take the wheel on her own. Her instructor Darwan (Ben Kingsley) is a Sikh Indian who watches with alarm as his pupil falls apart at the seams. He himself is contemplating an arranged marriage with a woman he has never met. As these two lives intersect,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Watch: Ben Kingsley & Patricia Clarkson Hit The Road In The First Trailer For ‘Learning To Drive’

Sometimes it can be feast or famine in terms of a director’s presence, because Hollywood can be a cruel development mistress. But Spanish filmmaker Isabel Coixet’s work life is fecund at the moment. Earlier this year, she unveiled her Berlin Film Festival-opener “Nobody Wants The Night,” and later this summer she’s got film number two, “Learning To Drive.” The latter film reunites her with Ben Kingsley and Patricia Clarkson, two of the stars of her 2008 movie, “Elegy.” But where that film was a dark picture about adultery, love, and the complications of relationships, “Learning To Drive” has a decidedly more cheery bent. It’s a feel-good, coming-of-middle-age comedy about a mismatched pair who help each other overcome life's road blocks. Here’s the official synopsis: Read More: Meet Isabel Coixet - 'Learning to Drive' Wendy is a fiery Manhattan author whose husband has just left
See full article at The Playlist »

Ewan McGregor to Make Directorial Debut with ‘American Pastoral’

Ewan McGregor to Make Directorial Debut with ‘American Pastoral’
Ewan McGregor will make his directorial feature film debut with Lakeshore Entertainment’s “American Pastoral” in addition to starring with Jennifer Connelly and Dakota Fanning.

The long-in-development project is based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel written by Philip Roth. Phillip Noyce was previously attached to direct.

“Ewan’s talent goes far beyond his on-screen work, and we’re excited to be working with a director who is as passionate as we are about telling the story of ‘American Pastoral,’” Lakeshore CEO Tom Rosenberg said in a statement.

“It’s a great privilege to be working with Lakeshore on Phillip Roth’s astounding novel ‘American Pastoral,'” McGregor said. “I’ve wanted to direct for years and wanted to wait until I found a story that I ‘had’ to tell, and in this script I knew I had found that story.”

The screenplay was written by John Romano with filming scheduled for September in Pittsburgh.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

2015 Grammys winners: The complete list

  • Hitfix
2015 Grammys winners: The complete list
Complete list of winners and nominees of the 2014 Grammy Awards, held in Los Angeles at the Staples Center on Sunday February 8. Winners will be updated as they're announced during the telecast and pre-telecast. Record Of The Year “Fancy,” Iggy Azalea Featuring Charli Xcx “Chandelier,” Sia **Winner** “Stay With Me (Darkchild Version),” Sam Smith “Shake It Off,” Taylor Swift “All About That Bass,” Meghan Trainor Album Of The Year **Winner** “Morning Phase,” Beck “Beyoncé,” Beyoncé “X,” Ed Sheeran “In The Lonely Hour,” Sam Smith “Girl,” Pharrell Williams Song Of The Year “All About That Bass,” Kevin Kadish & Meghan Trainor, songwriters (Meghan Trainor) “Chandelier,” Sia Furler & Jesse Shatkin, songwriters (Sia) “Shake It Off,” Max Martin, Shellback & Taylor Swift, songwriters (Taylor Swift) **Winner** “Stay With Me (Darkchild Version),” James Napier, William Phillips & Sam Smith, songwriters (Sam Smith) “Take Me To Church,” Andrew Hozier-Byrne, songwriter (Hozier) Best New Artist Iggy Azalea Bastille Brandy Clark
See full article at Hitfix »

Ben Kingsley Added to Cast of Bruce Willis Film Wake

Oscar winner Ben Kingsley (The Boxtrolls, Iron Man 3) has joined the cast of John Pogue’s (The Quiet Ones) action thriller Wake starring Bruce Willis (Die Hard film franchise), and produced by Michael Benaroya (Lawless, Margin Call), Tobin Armbrust (A Walk Among The Tombstones, Begin Again), David Alpert (upcoming American Ultra, AMC’s ‘The Walking Dead’) and Chris Cowles (The Numbers Station, Autobahn).

International Film Trust (Ift) is handling foreign rights to the film, which they are actively selling at the European Film Market. CAA is representing the domestic sales rights.

“Sir Ben is a truly one of a kind talent, with a unique subtlety to his work. He brings characters to life and charges them with emotion and power at just the right moments. He’s a tremendous addition to this cast, I can’t wait to see what he does with Kole, this film’s powerful antagonist,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Berlinale 2015 Review: Nobody Wants The Night: A Beautiful But Flawed Epic

Spanish auteur Isabel Coixet (Elegy, My Life Without Me) opened Berlinale with her latest and most ambitious film to date, Nobody Wants the Night. Based on real life persons (though it was unclear whether the events actually occurred), it is a visually stunning film, a raw and anguishing story of love, betrayal and cultural conflict. And yet, it is perhaps this ambition that brings out some serious narrative problems that, while I didn't actively dislike them, made the film a bit less than the sum of its parts.Juliette Binoche (looking more than a little like an aged Julie Christie in Dr. Zhivago) plays Josephine Peary, wife of the Arctic Explorer Robert Peary. An arctic adventurer herself, she has come to Ellesmere Island in 1908 to...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Berlin: 'Nobody Wants the Night' Director Isabel Coixet Won't Ever Work With Your Studio

  • Indiewire
Berlin: 'Nobody Wants the Night' Director Isabel Coixet Won't Ever Work With Your Studio
Following the first screening of "Nobody Wants the Night," director Isabel Coixet and stars Juliette Binoche, Rinko Kikuchi and Gabriel Byrne led a memorable press conference that quickly put us Berlinale-goers in our places. From the start, the Spanish director, known for films such as "Elegy" and last year's "Learning To Drive," was no bullshit. "You want to know the truth," she'd say after each posed question. She then candidly delves into the problems she faced making her latest endeavor, problems with the rhetoric surrounding female directors and problems with the industry in general. "Nobody Wants the Night" may have opened the 65th Berlin International Film Festival, but Coixet in the flesh truly got things going.  Read More: Berlin: Elisabeth Moss on Going Mental for Alex Ross Perry in 'Queen of Earth' Following the film's world premiere, Indiewire had the opportunity to sit down with the filmmaker to further...
See full article at Indiewire »

Penelope Cruz and Diane Kruger In Final Negotiations to Star in This Man, This Woman

Oscar winner Penelope Cruz (Vicky Cristina Barcelona, Pirates Of The Caribbean: On Stranger Tides) and Diane Kruger (Inglorious Basterds, National Treasure) are in final negotiations to star in the romance feature film This Man, This Woman, to be directed by Isabel Coixet whose new film Nobody Wants The Night opens the 2015 Berlin International Film Festival, it was announced today by Fortitude International co-founders, Nadine de Barros and Robert Ogden Barnum, and producer Mike Lobell (The Freshman, Striptease).

Fortitude International is financing the film and will handle foreign sales on the project being introduced to buyers at the European Film Market in Berlin next month.

De Barros and Barnum serve as executive producers. Lobell is producing the film.

The romance is written by Oscar winner Frederic Raphael (Eyes Wide Shut, Darling, Two For The Road).

CAA is representing domestic rights.

An estranged man, Matt Heller, and a woman, Martha Parks (Cruz
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

The Humbling | Review

Or The Unexpected Convenience of Sexism: Levinson’s Perplexing but Deviously Funny Stab at Roth

Decades passed between initial adaptations of novelist Philip Roth’s novels (1969’s Goodbye Columbus; 1972’s Portnoy’s Complaint) before filmmakers like Robert Benton and Isabel Coixet mounted their own renditions to varied reception in the past decade or so with The Human Stain (2003) and Elegy (2008), respectively. After a decently received found footage horror film with 2012’s The Bay, seasoned director Barry Levinson adapts The Humbling, which, like Roth’s novel itself, initially received some of the same unfavorable notices from Venice and Toronto Int. Film Fests. But Roth’s novels are exactly the kind of difficult narratives that used to make for a tradition of daring cinema that’s been eclipsed by safety and sanitization in an effort to decrease offense and increase mass satisfaction. That’s not to say that Levinson is entirely successful
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Watch: First Trailer For Berlin Film Festival Opener 'Nobody Wants The Night' With Juliette Binoche & Rinko Kikuchi

We'll show up to watch Juliette Binoche in pretty much anything, but toss Rinko Kikuchi into the mix, in a film directed by Isabel Coixet ("My Life Without Me," "The Secret Life Of Words," "Elegy"), in a based-on-a-true-story tale set in the arctic? Yes, please. That film is "Nobody Wants The Night," and the first trailer has arrived. Slated to open the Berlin International Film Festival next month, the movie is based on a true story, and is set in 1908, in the wintry reaches of Greenland. Here's the official synopsis: Josephine Peary is a mature, proud, determined and naive woman, in love with celebrated Arctic adventurer Robert Peary, a man who prefers glory and ice to the comforts of an upper-class home. For him she will face all danger, even risk her own life. Another woman, young but wise, brave and humble – Allaka – is in love with the same man,
See full article at The Playlist »

Juliette Binoche Braves the Elements in First Trailer For Berlin Opener ‘Nobody Wants The Night’

Yes, there will be non-Terrence Malick-directed films at the Berlin Film Festival this year. The first one out of the gate at the prestigious festival will be the latest film from Elegy director Isabel Coixet, Nobody Wants the Night. Starring Juliette Binoche, Rinko Kikuchi, Gabriel Byrne, and Matt Salinger, there’s no word on a U.S. release yet, but […]
See full article at The Film Stage »

First Look: Juliette Binoche In Isabel Coixet's 'Nobody Wants The Night,' Opening The Berlin Film Festival

There should be a bigger spotlight on filmmaker Isabel Coixet. She makes small, unflashy but memorable films, like "Elegy," "My Life Without Me," "The Secret Life Of Words," and more recently, "Learning To Drive," all of which have culled the director a small but devoted following. But Coixet gets her biggest showcase yet at the upcoming Berlin International Film Festival. Coixet's "Nobody Wants The Night" has been selected as the opening night movie at the festival. Juliette Binoche, Rinko Kikuchi and Gabriel Byrne star in a movie taking place in the Arctic seclusion of Greenland in 1908. The adventure film focuses on courageous women and ambitious men who put anything at stake for love and glory. We like both the cast and premise, so sign us up. The Berlin Film Festival runs from February 5th to 15th.
See full article at The Playlist »
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