On the 4th of December 2005, David Fitzpatrick was a normal 25-year-old with family, friends and memories. That afternoon whilst traveling on a train David suffered on of the rarest forms ... See full summary »

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On the 4th of December 2005, David Fitzpatrick was a normal 25-year-old with family, friends and memories. That afternoon whilst traveling on a train David suffered on of the rarest forms of memory loss ever recorded. The condition, known as a Psychogenic Fugue, wiped his memory clean, leaving him with no identity. This films follows David as he tries to find the life he had before. His journey offers him an opportunity not only to start again, but also reveals a dark past he would rather forget... Written by Anonymous

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22 January 2007 (UK)  »

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Spoiler alert
25 January 2008 | by (Sydney, Australia) – See all my reviews

Why am I not surprised that no one else has commented on this documentary? This movie is a scam. It purports to tell the story of David Fitzpatrick in a "memory fugue".

This guy's last memory is of standing in front of the Emergency Dept of a hospital in England. I started to become suspicious when he could remember a friend's house on a map but no one in his family. When he is released from hospital he can play a very good game of football but can't remember anything about his high school.

There is not a single medical professional in this movie to substantiate David Fitzpatrick's story. There is a psychologist who comments about the nature of memory but never in direct relation to David Fitzpatrick, which makes me suspect he had no idea what he was being interviewed for.

David Fitzpatrick and his friends discuss at great lengths their theories of how this fugue state occurred without any benefit of medical evidence or support.

I think that Dave Fitzpatrick and his mates did this to either make money or to become famous. Neither of those outcomes have occurred. Thankfully, no-one has been gullible enough to accept this heap of crap.


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