7.3/10
370
7 user 13 critic

Operation Homecoming: Writing the Wartime Experience (2007)

A unique documentary about troops' experiences in Iraq and Afghanistan, based on writings by soldiers, Marines, and air men. Some writings were published in the New Yorker in summer 2006. A... See full summary »

Director:

Writers:

(story "Men in Black"), (story "Camp Muckamungus") | 7 more credits »
Reviews

On Disc

at Amazon

Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 2 wins & 4 nominations. See more awards »
Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

War Dance (2007)
Documentary | Music | War
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.9/10 X  

Three children living in a displacement camp in northern Uganda compete in their country's national music and dance festival.

Directors: Sean Fine, Andrea Nix
Stars: Dominic, Nancy, Rose
Documentary | War
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.3/10 X  

Stories from modern day Iraq as told by Iraqis living in a time of war, occupation and ethnic tension.

Director: James Longley
Stars: Mohammed Haithem, Suleiman Mahmoud, Muqtada al-Sadr
Documentary
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8/10 X  

Documentary on the migratory patterns of birds, shot over the course of three years on all seven continents.

Directors: Jacques Perrin, Jacques Cluzaud, and 1 more credit »
Stars: Jacques Perrin, Philippe Labro
Documentary | War
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.3/10 X  

A comprehensive look at the Bush Administration's conduct of the Iraq war and its occupation of the country.

Director: Charles Ferguson
Stars: Campbell Scott, Gerald Burke, Ali Fadhil
Edit

Cast

Credited cast:
Sharon D. Allen ...
Herself
...
Voice 'Aftermath'
Colby Buzzell ...
Himself / Writer
Richard Currey ...
Himself
...
Taking Chance (voice)
...
Road Work (voice)
Paul Fussell ...
Himself
...
'Distant Thunder' (voice)
Edward Parker Gyokeres ...
Himself
Joe Haldeman ...
Himself
Sangjoon Han ...
Himself
...
Himself / Writer
...
Voice 'Men in Black, ' 'Aftermath' (voice)
Yusef Komunyakaa ...
Himself
...
Camp Muckamungus (voice)
Edit

Storyline

A unique documentary about troops' experiences in Iraq and Afghanistan, based on writings by soldiers, Marines, and air men. Some writings were published in the New Yorker in summer 2006. A larger assortment was published as a book by Random House last September. The film drew upon the submissions by soldiers for the book. It's a remarkable portrait of troops at war - the complexities, doubts, and fears - written with honesty. The 81-minute version of the film (which will be in theatres) includes 11 pieces of writing, with different visual strategies, along with interviews with the writers, and with more established American writers who are also veterans. In the latter group are Tim O'Brien, Yusef Komunyakaa, Tobias Wolff, Joe Haldeman, James Salter, Anthony Swofford, Richard Currey, and Paul Fussell. The visual approaches range from poet Brian Turner reading directly to camera, to archival footage, to an animated "graphic novel," to a still photo sequence shot by photographer Antonin... Written by Adam Hyman, co-producer

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Genres:

Documentary

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

9 February 2007 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Epiheirisi gyrismos  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Box Office

Budget:

$1,200,000 (estimated)
 »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Color:

| (HDCAM)

Aspect Ratio:

1.78 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Connections

Featured in The 80th Annual Academy Awards (2008) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Words From The Front Lines
6 February 2012 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

There are experiences that can never be truly traded away or passed along, no matter how hard we try. The amazement and beauty of childbirth, the crushing sorrow of losing a parent, or even the serenity of knowing a job is well done. Try as we might, these things exist inside us and everyone else will only feel a sliver of what it is like through how we describe it. One of the most profound and life altering experiences is war and no one is affected by it more than those on the front lines. There is always training, there is always a new method to try to prepare, but no one comes back from war the way they went in. Our country is now in the midst of welcoming home thousands upon thousands of soldiers from the fighting in Middle East and those brave warriors face not only the struggles of reintegrating into society (and finding a job), but figuring out rote answers to that all too common question, "What was it like?" Those can be extremely hard conversations to have, but this film documents a program trying to help those soldier find a path to communication.

Operation Homecoming: Writing the Wartime Experience is an essay/memoir writing program that teaches soldiers how to use creative and journal style writing to get their thoughts and experiences cohesively onto paper. These tales of horror, fright, bravery and solitude pull the curtains away from the glorified image of war and patriotism, humanizing the soldiers.

The film brings together not only some of the authors of the essays, but also fellow writers, professionals in telling stories, who happen to also have personal experiences with wartime and being soldiers themselves. Together they weave a painfully accurate and unflinching tapestry of what wartime is really like, not painted in the bright red, white and blue of the flag, but doused in the blackest of night and dripping with the deep red of dead enemies, comrades and innocents. Some of them show the confusion suffered at the other end of a motor attack, while others detail the adrenaline rush of being ambushed and making the split second decisions on whether the person your sights is a combatant or a bystander, and does it even matter.

One by one, you hear about the deconstruction of the basic human belief to protect life as it rages against the programmed need to defend your country, your fellow soldiers and yourself. The documentary does not play itself out as a case for pacifism by any means, but there lingers a certain belief when the screen finally goes black that philosophers have intoned for years: in war, there is no winner.

Politics and beliefs aside, the real effort and success of this is the program itself and how it helps those soldiers returning from a living hell on earth, find their way back into a society that will never be completely theirs. It allows them to find a method of communication, almost a new way of speaking to the uninitiated about the nightmares they have lived through and continue to struggle with. More and more soldiers are coming back with PTSD and a variety of psychological issues, leading to drinking, drugs and a silently suffering uptick in post-return suicides. This program is certainly not the only weapon needed in the fight for the mental health of our returning warriors, but every effort counts and they're are worth it.


0 of 0 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?