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Hugo (2011)

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In Paris in 1931, an orphan named Hugo Cabret who lives in the walls of a train station is wrapped up in a mystery involving his late father and an automaton.

Director:

Writers:

(screenplay), (book)
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Popularity
1,422 ( 127)
Won 5 Oscars. Another 57 wins & 186 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Uncle Claude
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Rene Tabard
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Madame Emilie
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Monsieur Frick
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Policeman
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Young Tabard
Shaun Aylward ...
Street Kid
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Storyline

Hugo is an orphan boy living in the walls of a train station in 1930s Paris. He learned to fix clocks and other gadgets from his father and uncle which he puts to use keeping the train station clocks running. The only thing that he has left that connects him to his dead father is an automaton (mechanical man) that doesn't work without a special key. Hugo needs to find the key to unlock the secret he believes it contains. On his adventures, he meets George Melies, a shopkeeper, who works in the train station, and his adventure-seeking god-daughter. Hugo finds that they have a surprising connection to his father and the automaton, and he discovers it unlocks some memories the old man has buried inside regarding his past. Written by napierslogs

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Discover the Key to the Mystery. See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG for mild thematic material, some action/peril and smoking | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Official Sites:

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Country:

Language:

Release Date:

23 November 2011 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

The Invention of Hugo Cabret  »

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Box Office

Budget:

$150,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$11,364,505, 18 November 2011, Wide Release

Gross USA:

$73,864,507, 12 April 2012

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$185,770,160, 12 April 2012
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

When Brian Selznick heard that Martin Scorsese wanted to adapt his book The Invention of Hugo Cabret into a movie, Brian Selznick said, of course it has to be directed by Martin Scorsese. See more »

Goofs

The concealed compartment in the armoire catches Hugo's eye because the right hand side of the bottom of the board covering it projects out rather than being flush with the rest of the front (0:59:19 to 0:59:20). In a close-up while Isabelle investigates it (0:59:51 to 0:59:52), it is the left hand side of the bottom of the board projecting out. She presses on it (0:59:53) and it slides into a flush fit, but, after a brief cut to Hugo, the left side is shown projecting out again. See more »

Quotes

Hugo Cabret: [Angry and disappointed that the automaton hasn't written anything of sense] What an idiot! Thinking I could fix it!
Isabelle: Hugo...
[Hugo looses his composure and begins smashing various items in the room]
Hugo Cabret: It's broken! It's always been broken!
[Sits in chair, covers his face and begins to cry]
Isabelle: Hugo, it doesn't have to be like this. You can fix it.
Hugo Cabret: [crying] You don't... you don't understand. I thought... I thought if I could fix it... then I wouldn't be so alone.
[...]
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Crazy Credits

There is only one opening credit, the film's title, which does not appear until nearly 15 minutes into the film. See more »

Connections

Features Dickson Experimental Sound Film (1894) See more »

Soundtracks

Carinosa
Written by Alberto Larena and Auguste Pesenti
Produced by Jean-Michel Bernard
Performed by Les Primitifs du Futur: Dominique Cravic, Hervé Legeay, Romane, Jean-Philippe Viret, Mathilde Febrer and Daniel Colin
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Beautiful film for cinema fans
25 November 2011 | by See all my reviews

Someone compared this movie to a Hans Christian Andersen tale and I think this is about as good a comparison as it gets. Some people find it boring and painful, others are mesmerized and inspired by the story it tells and the way it does so. In short, if you prefer Disney's version of the little mermaid story, you will likely be disappointed by Hugo.

On the other hand, if you like the attention to detail and the not entirely happy endings of Andersen's classic short stories, you will probably find that Hugo is a captivating film that is hard to describe in a few words. It really lives in a lot more than three dimensions.

If you also happen to be a cinema fan, you will love it even more. What is a cinema fan? It's person that appreciates films for more than just their entertainment value. The way movies are made, the different layers of audio, visuals, emotions, symbols, the photography, the standout supporting casts, the way you can predict the cliché moves sometimes, but love it anyway. We love the good movies, like the bad ones, and films like Hugo make our hearts sing.

One last note on the use of 3D. I usually avoid 3D versions of movies because that feature has not yet proved itself to be more than just a gimmick. In Hugo's case, it is still partially true. I watched it in 3D and the opening sequence in the train station as well as a couple other select shots were exceptionally staged for 3D. Aside from that though, you get used to the effect and thankfully, it's the story that stays in the center of attention, followed by beautiful cinematography, characters, and 3D is trailing humbly behind. If you have the opportunity, watch the 3D version, but you will not really love it in 2D any less.


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