Watch Now

From $2.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

ON DISC
In Paris in 1931, an orphan named Hugo Cabret who lives in the walls of a train station is wrapped up in a mystery involving his late father and an automaton.

Director:

Writers:

(screenplay), (book)
Reviews
Popularity
1,464 ( 68)
Won 5 Oscars. Another 57 wins & 185 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
Monsieur Labisse
...
...
...
...
...
...
Policeman
...
Young Tabard
Shaun Aylward ...
Street Kid
Edit

Storyline

Hugo is an orphan boy living in the walls of a train station in 1930s Paris. He learned to fix clocks and other gadgets from his father and uncle which he puts to use keeping the train station clocks running. The only thing that he has left that connects him to his dead father is an automaton (mechanical man) that doesn't work without a special key. Hugo needs to find the key to unlock the secret he believes it contains. On his adventures, he meets George Melies, a shopkeeper, who works in the train station, and his adventure-seeking god-daughter. Hugo finds that they have a surprising connection to his father and the automaton, and he discovers it unlocks some memories the old man has buried inside regarding his past. Written by napierslogs

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Unlock the secret See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG for mild thematic material, some action/peril and smoking | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
Edit

Details

Official Sites:

| |  »

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

23 November 2011 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

The Invention of Hugo Cabret  »

Box Office

Budget:

$150,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$11,364,505 (USA) (18 November 2011)

Gross:

$73,820,094 (USA) (6 April 2012)
 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

| |

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

The cam mechanism in the automaton is heavily inspired by the machinery in the Jaquet-Droz automata, built between 1768 and 1774. Indeed these automata are still in working condition (they can be seen at the Musée d'Art et d'Histoire of Neuchâtel, in Switzerland) and are capable of drawing figures as complicated as the drawing depicted in the film. Many nuances such as the head following the pen as it was drawing and dipping the pen in ink were also present in the automata in real life. See more »

Goofs

After Tabard finishes showing A Trip to the Moon, the reel is still full. When Georges Méliès enters the room the reel is empty. See more »

Quotes

Hugo Cabret: [Angry and disappointed that the automaton hasn't written anything of sense] What an idiot! Thinking I could fix it!
Isabelle: Hugo...
[Hugo looses his composure and begins smashing various items in the room]
Hugo Cabret: It's broken! It's always been broken!
[Sits in chair, covers his face and begins to cry]
Isabelle: Hugo, it doesn't have to be like this. You can fix it.
Hugo Cabret: [crying] You don't... you don't understand. I thought... I thought if I could fix it... then I wouldn't be so alone.
[...]
See more »

Crazy Credits

There is only one opening credit, the film's title, which does not appear until nearly 15 minutes into the film. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Nostalgia Critic: Jack (2012) See more »

Soundtracks

Si Tu Veux Marguerite
Written by Albert Valensi and Joseph Vincentelli
Produced by Jean-Michel Bernard
Performed by Olivier Constantin and Jean-Michel Bernard
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more (Spoiler Alert!) »

User Reviews

 
Beautiful!!
23 November 2011 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

I just returned home after seeing Hugo on opening day and if I can describe this film in one word, it would be beautiful. This film has inspired me in ways that I can't even begin to explain. It's been a while since I've seen a film that spoke to me as personally as this film did. I'm a fan of Martin Scorsese and he's crafted a beautiful ode to not only cinema but also imagination and in a way, it celebrates all the things that help us escape. The world is a scary place and everyone goes through pain and suffering but if you just try and learn to dream, find your voice and not be afraid then you would be surprised what could happen.

I love how this film tells the amazing story of pioneer filmmaker Georges Melies who many of today's directors such as Steven Spielberg and James Cameron owe everything to. I love his films and I own a box set of his work, it's wonderful to see more people be introduced to him and the magic he created that continues to capture the imagination of many.

So if you love the cinema and magic then I highly recommend this masterpiece. Hugo is really something special I think.


200 of 335 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?