Lost (2004–2010)
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The Man from Tallahassee 

Jack tells Kate that he has made a deal with The Others; Locke hinders Jack's plan to leave the island

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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
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Desmond Hume (credit only)
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Claire Littleton (credit only)
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Hugo 'Hurley' Reyes (credit only)
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James 'Sawyer' Ford (credit only)
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Jin-Soo Kwon (credit only)
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Sun-Hwa Kwon (credit only)
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Charlie Pace (credit only)
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Nikki Fernandez (credit only)
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Paulo (credit only)
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Storyline

Kate and Sayid are captured in the 'Others' village while trying to rescue Jack, but John Locke escapes and finds the recovering Ben trapped on his bed. John asks Alex to bring Sayid's backpack with the explosives, and then he goes to the submarine to destroy it. Meanwhile, John recalls how he became paraplegic after having another encounter with his con-artist father, Anthony Cooper, who John tried to thwart his latest con victim, and Mr. Cooper attempted to kill him. Written by Claudio Carvalho, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

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TV-14 | See all certifications »
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Release Date:

21 March 2007 (USA)  »

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1.78 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

On one table in Ben's home you can see a copy of Stephen Hawking's 'A Brief History of Time'. In Lost: Not in Portland (2007), an Other named Aldo was studying black holes from this very same book. See more »

Goofs

When Kate goes to confront Jack, she opens the door and we see it's bare on the other side except for a strip metal hinge at the top. In the very next shot when she's entering, there is a shirt hanging on the other side of the door and the strip is gone. Obviously, it's a different location altogether. See more »

Quotes

Ben Linus: Picture a box. You know something about boxes don't you John? What if I told you that somewhere on this island there's a very large box and whatever you imagined, whatever you wanted to be in it, when you opened that box there it would be. What would you say about that John?
Locke: I'd say, "I hope that box is big enough to imagine yourself up a new submarine."
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Crazy Credits

The producers gratefully acknowledge the cooperation of the people of Hawaii and their Aloha spirit. See more »

Soundtracks

End Title
(uncredited)
Written by Michael Giacchino
Performed by The Hollywood Studio Symphony
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User Reviews

A masterpiece of television writing
17 December 2008 | by (prejudicemadeplausible.wordpress.com) – See all my reviews

"The Man From Tallahassee" manages to beat "Walkabout" for the title of the best Locke episode, and that is no small feat. Overall it is one of the show's greatest accomplishments in every regard: it boasts some of Jack Bender's best direction, some of the best acting on the show, especially from Michael Emerson, who manages in this episode to eclipse every one of his other performances, perhaps because it is Ben's meatiest episode since season two, giving Emerson ample opportunity to shine, and some of the finest writing on the show.

There is a tendency among some internet fans to speak of 'characterLOST' and 'mysteryLOST' as two separate things, the 'mythology' and the 'characters' as two separate aspects of the show. This is far from the truth, and the show's weakest episodes come when the focus is on one or the other. What makes "Lost" special is the intriguing, mysterious story and specifically how it relates to the many great characters on the show. "The Man From Tallahassee" finds the perfect balance here. We get loads of intrigue on the island, John and Jack's conversations with Ben, the submarine being blown up, the final twist of the episode, but everything is written with the characters in mind. Drew Goddard and Jeff Pinkner did a superb job writing this episode.

The flashbacks are some of the absolute best, revealing the brutally sad truth behind how Locke ended up in a wheelchair. They are made even better by a perfect Terry O'Quinn performance, and the scene with Locke in the hospital after the fall is one of the most emotional and genuinely touching scenes on the show. "The Man from Tallahassee" is a real tour-de-force. Excuse the use of that term, usually reserved for hyperbole coming from morons, but it really does apply here. Everything about this episode is absolutely perfect from top to bottom.


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