Lil and Wally should have seen enough of lazy brother, Benny by now. But Benny and his busty, girlfriend, Molly, con both Wally and Lil to go to a Spanish holiday with them. Wally ends up footing the bill for the holiday as usual of course.

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Cast

Episode credited cast:
Arthur Mullard ...
Queenie Watts ...
Mike Reid ...
Valerie Walsh ...
Molly
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Georgina Melville ...
Nurse
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Courier
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Lil and Wally should have seen enough of lazy brother, Benny by now. But Benny and his busty, girlfriend, Molly, con both Wally and Lil to go to a Spanish holiday with them. Wally ends up footing the bill for the holiday as usual of course.

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Comedy

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Release Date:

28 November 1976 (UK)  »

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Spanish tummy!
27 May 2011 | by (Ambrosia) – See all my reviews

According to Francis Wheen, confusion exists as to when the Seventies really began. I'd always assumed it was 1st January 1970. Big Frank thinks not. On page 6 of 'Strange Days Indeed' - his would-be hatchet job on the past - he recounts leaving home in December 1973 to join the '60's counter-culture, only to be told to forget it as 'it was all over'. I was only ten then and at school and even I knew that the hippie dream of an alternative society based on peace and love was a busted flush. If the Seventies began late in 1973, does this mean its safe for us to like the movie of 'On The Buses' because its really a product of the Sixties? If the Seventies ended in 1983, should we hate 'The Young Ones' for being part of the decade of lava lamps and tank-tops? Wheen does not say. One wonders if his unreasonable hatred stems from bitterness caused not only by his failure to change the world for the better but also to have it off with Cherry Gillespie of 'Pan's People'.

Wheen's views on 'Yus My Dear' are not on record, but its fair to assume he is no admirer of the unique comic talents of Arthur Mullard and Queenie Watts ( he even takes a pop at 'Fawlty Towers' in his book ). In 2006, I wrote a negative review based on my memories of the show ( it was not out on D.V.D. then ). Watching it again recently, I stand by a lot of what I said, but must admit several of the Season 2 episodes are quite funny. 'Dear' somehow managed to turn itself into a reasonable approximation of 'On The Buses', particularly the plots about the new bed and Wally's 'tryst' with blowsy Pat Ashton. Mike Reid's 'Benny' still gets on my nerves, but some of his scenes with Mullard - such as them finding the food in the deep freezer ruined - were undeniably hilarious.

'The Holiday' rounded off Season 2 and indeed the show itself. It did not do as well the second time round ( possibly because it was not networked ) and did not get renewed, much to the pleasure of its critics. Benny sweet-talks his 'fick' brother into paying for a package holiday to Spain. But the plane is diverted to Istanbul and they are left stranded in the airport. After eating a manky pork pie from an out-of-order dispenser, Wally gets 'guts ache' and has to go home with Lil, leaving Benny and girlfriend Molly ( the gorgeous Valerie Walsh ) to go to Spain without them.

John Quayle ( 'the courier' ) was 'Malcolm' in 'Terry & June', while Georgina Melville ( 'the nurse' ) played Dick Stuart-Clark's wife in the ill-fated 'Doctor At The Top'.

Funniest moment - packing a suitcase in a tearing hurry, Benny gets tomato sauce from a sandwich on Wally's shirts. Wally is furious, until Benny says: "the way you eat, its probably where it would have ended up!". You can easily imagine Reg Varney's Stan Butler saying that line, can't you?


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