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Miles Teller Reveals Why Nicole Kidman Wouldn’t Speak To Him On Set Of ‘Rabbit Hole’

  • ET Canada
Nicole Kidman refused to speak to Miles Teller on the set of their 2010 movie “Rabbit Hole”, the actor has revealed. Teller, 30, spoke about working with the Oscar-winning actress, 50, on the set of his very first movie. However, things didn’t go exactly as expected, as he admitted Kidman failed to talk to him […]
See full article at ET Canada »

The 20 Saddest Movies of the 21st Century, From ‘Amour’ to ‘Million Dollar Baby’

  • Indiewire
The 20 Saddest Movies of the 21st Century, From ‘Amour’ to ‘Million Dollar Baby’
As much as we all love a stunning tracking shot or an impeccably stylized thriller, even the most discerning cinephiles have to admit: Sometimes, you just want a good cry. Often it’s the most gut-wrenching movies that remain in our collective cultural memory the longest; “Sophie’s Choice,” “Terms of Endearment,” and “Schindler’s List,” to name just a few. Even in an age when auteur-driven driven sci-fi and superhero franchises reign supreme, Hollywood will always love a good old-fashioned tearjerker. Which is why we thought it necessary to single out some of the saddest movies of the century — so far.

Read More:The 20 Scariest Movie Scenes of the 21st Century

Though it might sound trite, one doesn’t have to give up gorgeous cinematography or a tightly-wound script in order to be moved. Not only do the films on this list find beauty in the most heartbreaking of human experiences,
See full article at Indiewire »

Quote of the Day: Nicole Kidman Says Being an Advocate Means Putting Things Into Action

Kidman in “Big Little Lies

2017 saw Nicole Kidman working with two renowned women directors: Jane Campion for “Top of the Lake: China Girl” and Sofia Coppola for “The Beguiled.” Her upcoming projects include Rebecca Miller’s “She Came to Me,” a comedic drama following intertwined love stories, and Karyn Kusama’s “Destroyer,” a crime drama where she’ll play an Lapd detective. It’s no coincidence that the Oscar winner is starring in so many women-helmed projects. The actress has pledged to work with a female director every 18 months, a decision she discussed with Miller in a recent Glamour feature.

“As an actor you’re only as good as the things you’re offered. And there just weren’t any women offering me things. So when you dissect that, you realize there aren’t women offering you things because they don’t have the opportunities,” Kidman explained. “I work to raise money for women’s cancers; I use my voice for violence against women. And so I was like, ‘I need to be part of the movement that will, hopefully, change the statistics in my field.’”

The “Big Little Lies” actress emphasized that talking about the issue isn’t enough. “Because, to be an advocate, you have to actually put things into action,” she observed. “It’s like, ‘Ok, Rebecca. You’re making a movie? Let’s go.’ ‘Ok, Karyn Kusama’ — I’m working with her next — ‘we may not have an enormous budget, but let’s go do it. I’ll get down in the trenches with you.’ My nine-year-old daughter wants to be a director right now. Her whole attitude is ‘The world’s my oyster.’ She doesn’t realize that it’s actually not.”

Kidman won an Oscar for her performance in “The Hours” and earned nods for “Lion,” “Rabbit Hole,” and “Moulin Rouge!” She just picked up Emmy Awards for starring in and producing “Big Little Lies,” HBO’s adaptation of Liane Moriarity’s bestselling novel of the same name. She played a talented lawyer who sacrifices her career to be a stay-at-home mom under pressure from her abusive husband. A second season has yet to be confirmed.

“The idea that women and men are equal is a part of my DNA,” Kidman recently wrote in Net-a-Porter’s Porter Magazine. In an open letter addressed to her “3.5 billion strong and beautiful sisters,” she said that she prides herself on portraying “strong, independent women that went against the expectations of society,” and it’s been her “driving force to make it in an industry that is still largely run by men.”

Quote of the Day: Nicole Kidman Says Being an Advocate Means Putting Things Into Action was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

The Top Five Miles Teller Roles of His Young Career

Miles Teller is a young actor who was born on February 20, 1987, in Downington, Pennsylvania. He started acting in 2004 and appeared in both television series and short films. His feature film debut was in ‘Rabbit Hole’ in 2010. He also had supporting roles in ‘Project X’ and ‘Footloose’. He has since gone on to play many leading roles in feature films and is establishing a successful career in the film industry. Here are our picks for five of Miles Teller’s best movie roles in his career so far: 1. That Awkward Moment Zac Efron starred in the lead

The Top Five Miles Teller Roles of His Young Career
See full article at TVovermind.com »

Interview, Audio: Miles Teller on ‘Thank You for Your Service’

Chicago – When Johnny comes marching home again, as the old song goes, we’ll give him a hearty welcome then. Most Americans truncate that to the phrase, “Thank You for Your Service,” which is the title of a new film featuring Miles Teller, who portrays Iraq War veteran Adam Schumann, and is the directorial debut of Jason Hall.

The film is about the lingering effects of being on a battlefield, and the lack of care given to the soldiers who have Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (Ptsd). Adam Schumann (Teller) comes home from the Iraq War to his wife and kids, along with a couple other buddies from his unit, Will and Solo (Joe Cole and Beulah Koale). As they try to assimilate back to normalcy, Will takes his own life. This triggers buried war traumas in Adam and Solo, and they lash out in different ways against the battle fatigue and families.
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Nicole Kidman’s Best Performances — IndieWire Critics Survey

Nicole Kidman’s Best Performances — IndieWire Critics Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: In honor of “The Killing of a Sacred Deer,” what is Nicole Kidman’s greatest performance?

Vadim Rizov (@VRizov), Filmmaker Magazine

I don’t know about “best” — I haven’t seen an embarrassing chunk of what are considered her most significant roles, and I’m weak on understanding acting — but the performance that sticks most in my mind (quite possibly because I saw it at impressionable high school age) is “Dogville.” Kidman is spookily withdrawn, like an observer alien in a human body dropped into a moral wasteland which she attempts to navigate with understanding and decorum until finally it’s just too much. As in “Birth,
See full article at Indiewire »

Miles Teller talks playing the hero in Only the Brave and Thank You for Your Service

  • Cineplex
Miles Teller talks playing the hero in Only the Brave and Thank You for Your ServiceMiles Teller talks playing the hero in Only the Brave and Thank You for Your ServiceJim Slotek, Cineplex Magazine10/18/2017 9:52:00 Am

Even before he starred in last year’s boxing movie actually called Bleed for This, Miles Teller proved he was willing to bleed for his craft — all over his drum kit in his breakthrough, Oscar-nominated film Whiplash, for example.

Teller, whose acting has been defined by extreme choices of late, is back on screen testing his limits in two movies this month, playing a firefighter battling a killer blaze in Only the Brave and an Iraq War veteran in Thank You for Your Service. Both films are based on true stories.

Written and directed by American Sniper author Jason Hill, based on David Finkel’s 2013 non-fiction book, Thank You for Your Service tells
See full article at Cineplex »

Gotham Awards: John Cameron Mitchell to Host

John Cameron Mitchell will host this year's Gotham Awards, it was announced Wednesday.

Mitchell wrote and starred in the original off-Broadway production of Hedwig and the Angry Inch. He adapted the musical into a movie in 2001, which earned him a Gotham Award for best directorial debut. And he reprised his role as Hedwig when the musical opened on Broadway in 2014, winning a special Tony Award in 2015 for his return to the role.

Mitchell also directed the 2011 film version of Rabbit Hole, produced by and starring Nicole Kidman, who is set to receive the...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Gotham Awards: John Cameron Mitchell to Host

Gotham Awards: John Cameron Mitchell to Host
John Cameron Mitchell will host this year's Gotham Awards, it was announced Wednesday.

Mitchell wrote and starred in the original off-Broadway production of Hedwig and the Angry Inch. He adapted the musical into a movie in 2001, which earned him a Gotham Award for best directorial debut. And he reprised his role as Hedwig when the musical opened on Broadway in 2014, winning a special Tony Award in 2015 for his return to the role.

Mitchell also directed the 2011 film version of Rabbit Hole, produced by and starring Nicole Kidman, who is set to receive the...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Trailer Watch: Alien Elle Fanning Discovers Punk Music in “How to Talk to Girls at Parties”

How to Talk to Girls at Parties

The trailer for the 1977 London-set “How to Talk to Girls at Parties” begins with Enn (Alex Sharp, Marti Noxon’s “To the Bone”) and his friends attending a concert’s after-party. Hoping to meet some girls, the three punk music lovers encounter Zan (Elle Fanning) and her cohort of orange leather-clad, six-fingered, monotone friends. “They must be from California,” Enn’s buddy guesses. He’s not that off: Zan and company are actually aliens from outer space.

Zan and her fellow extraterrestrials, including Stella (Ruth Wilson, “The Affair”), are visiting Earth a rite of passage — but Zan is bored and ready to break away. In frustration, she cuts up her futuristic dress with a pair of scissors. “Do more punk to me,” she says as she hands the scissors to Enn.

Enn is happy to introduce Zan to London’s punk scene, as is its leader, Boadicea (Nicole Kidman). In punk music you have to “smash the oppressor, tell the truth, be an original, blah blah blah,” Boadicea explains to Zan. And as she falls more in love with punk culture and Enn, Zan realizes she’ll eventually have to speak her truth and choose between Earth and her own planet.

How to Talk to Girls at Parties” is directed by John Cameron Mitchell (“Hedwig and the Angry Inch”), who penned the script with Philippa Goslett (“Little Ashes”) from a Neil Gaiman short story. Mitchell previously directed Kidman in the 2010 drama “Rabbit Hole.” “How to Talk to Girls” made its world premiere earlier this year at the Cannes Film Festival. It opens theatrically in Japan on December 1, but doesn’t have a U.S. release date yet.

https://medium.com/media/aeeae634ed80d4e39a6617e3b9ea600b/href

Trailer Watch: Alien Elle Fanning Discovers Punk Music in “How to Talk to Girls at Parties” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Hugh Hefner: The Ups and Downs of a Spectacular Life

Hugh Hefner: The Ups and Downs of a Spectacular Life
While Hugh Hefner had seen his reputation somewhat tarnished by Playmate Holly Madison‘s tell-all about life in the Playboy Mansion, Down the Rabbit Hole and the subsequent sale of the Playboy Mansion, but his life was about far more than what people tuning into The Girls Next Door or readers of Madison’s book might suspected.

Hefner’s death of natural causes throws the Playboy empire into a state of flux. For one thing, in a 2011 interview with The Hollywood Reporter Scott Flanders, CEO of Playboy, admitted there was no succession plan for leadership of the company. And for another,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Gotham Awards to Honor Nicole Kidman, Cinematographer Ed Lachman

Gotham Awards to Honor Nicole Kidman, Cinematographer Ed Lachman
Nicole Kidman and cinematographer Edward Lachman have joined the roster of industry figures to be honored with tributes at the 2017 Gotham Awards, Independent Filmmaker Project’s annual ceremony focused on indie film.

Kidman will receive the evening’s actress tribute for a career that launched with Philip Noyce’s 1989 thriller “Dead Calm” and has included films “The Others,” “Moulin Rouge!,” “The Hours” (which won her an Oscar) and “Rabbit Hole.” She’s currently up for an Emmy for her performance in HBO’s “Big Little Lies” and is currently appearing in the new season of “Top of the Lake”; her upcoming bigscreen work includes Sofia Coppola’s “The Beguiled,” Yorgos Lanthimos’ “The Killing of a Sacred Deer,” and Neil Burger’s “The Upside” (which recently premiered at the Toronto Film Festival).

Related

Al Gore, Jason Blum to Be Honored at 2017 Gotham Awards

Lachman wins the cinematography tribute for a long list of credits that includes films with
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘How To Talk To Girls At Parties’ Trailer: Elle Fanning Rocks ‘n Rolls

There were few movies at the Cannes Film Festival so perfectly overlapping our movie/music Venn diagram as “How To Talk To Girls At Parties.” And while it didn’t quite explode off the Croisette, we’re still eager to discover the picture that our critic called “gloriously bananas.”

Read More: The 25 Best Movie Soundtracks Of The 21st Century So Far

Directed by John Cameron Mitchell (“Shortbus,” “Rabbit Hole“), based on the short story by Neil Gaiman, and starring Elle Fanning, Nicole Kidman, Ruth Wilson, and Alex Sharp, the story follows an alien who comes to Earth and discovers punk rock.

Continue reading ‘How To Talk To Girls At Parties’ Trailer: Elle Fanning Rocks ‘n Rolls at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

How ‘Big Little Lies’ Broke the Rules to Lead Its Emmy Rivals

How ‘Big Little Lies’ Broke the Rules to Lead Its Emmy Rivals
Many elements elevated HBO’s “Big Little Lies” into the top Emmy contender for Best Limited Series. Yes, the saga about an unlikely trio of women who defeat a dangerous predator is hugely popular, and topical — but the main reason it’s a hit with critics, TV fans, and Emmy voters (16 Emmy nominations) is the seven-episode drama broke through the clutter by breaking the rules.

Here’s how the series broke from conventional TV:

Actress-producers: Nicole Kidman (Blossom Films) and Reese Witherspoon (Pacific Standard) — who are rivals for the mini-series Best Actress Emmy and both executive produced the series — partnered to nail down the rights to the 2014 novel, with Kidman personally approaching writer Liane Moriarty to meet at a coffee shop when she was visiting family in Sydney, Australia. “Let us option it with the promise that we’ll get it made,” she told her.

Witherspoon’s then-partner Bruna Papandrea,
See full article at Indiewire »

How ‘Big Little Lies’ Broke the Rules to Lead Its Emmy Rivals

How ‘Big Little Lies’ Broke the Rules to Lead Its Emmy Rivals
Many elements elevated HBO’s “Big Little Lies” into the top Emmy contender for Best Limited Series. Yes, the saga about an unlikely trio of women who defeat a dangerous predator is hugely popular, and topical — but the main reason it’s a hit with critics, TV fans, and Emmy voters (16 Emmy nominations) is the seven-episode drama broke through the clutter by breaking the rules.

Here’s how the series broke from conventional TV:

Actress-producers: Nicole Kidman (Blossom Films) and Reese Witherspoon (Pacific Standard) — who are rivals for the mini-series Best Actress Emmy and both executive produced the series — partnered to nail down the rights to the 2014 novel, with Kidman personally approaching writer Liane Moriarty to meet at a coffee shop when she was visiting family in Sydney, Australia. “Let us option it with the promise that we’ll get it made,” she told her.

Witherspoon’s then-partner Bruna Papandrea,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Cannes Review: ‘How to Talk to Girls at Parties’ is an Alienating Misfire

John Cameron Mitchell is a more-than-talented writer-director whose first three features (Hedwig and the Angry Inch, Shortbus, and Rabbit Hole) have all contributed to making him a distinct voice in American cinema. Perhaps it can be attributed to a slimming movie market, or maybe that there just wasn’t anything developing creatively for him, but he hasn’t directed a feature in seven years. If How to Talk to Girls at Parties is what he perceived as a comeback vehicle, Mitchell made an ill-suited choice, as his latest film offers a thinly-sketched culture clash that misses the romanticism of its source material.

Based on the 2006 short story by novelist Neil Gaiman, How to Talk to Girls at Parties is both an ode to punk rock and to 1970s sci-fi, especially 1976’s The Man Who Fell to Earth. The film tells the story of Enn (Alex Sharp), a punk enthusiast who
See full article at The Film Stage »

Cannes 2017: How to Talk to Girls at Parties Review

  • HeyUGuys
Author: Jo-Ann Titmarsh

There’s been a lot of anticipation for this film by John Cameron Mitchell, who brought us the entertaining Hedwig and the Angry Inch and the sombre and moving Rabbit Hole. Mitchell returns to the punk territory of the former, but unfortunately with less success.

We’re in Croydon in 1977. Punk is at its height and Queen Elizabeth II is celebrating her silver jubilee. This choice of 1977 gives the director plenty of Union Jacks and street parties to set against the iconic Sex Pistols song and record cover, which he uses consistently throughout the film. Our hero is Enn (Alex Sharp): he’s being raised by his single mum, his jazz musician dad having abandoned the family ship years earlier. With his two best mates, the chubby and cerebral John (Ethan Lawrence) and the Billy Idol lookalike Vic (Abraham Lewis), the three schoolboys have embraced punk.
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Cannes, Day 6: Punk Rock Aliens Party at Grand Palais; Sean Baker’s ‘Florida Project’ Shines

Cannes, Day 6: Punk Rock Aliens Party at Grand Palais; Sean Baker’s ‘Florida Project’ Shines
Didn’t you miss John Cameron Mitchell? The loud and proud auteur has been dabbling here and there with short films, producing, script and story polishing — but the “Hedwig and the Angry Inch” filmmaker hasn’t given us a significant feature since 2010’s stark “Rabbit Hole.” He’s back with an army of ambiguous millennials, and a much more joyous reteam with Nicole Kidman. More good news? Sean Baker has successfully captured the joy and abject poverty of Florida as he did for the trans sex workers of East Hollywood, to meaningful effect. Let’s do this, Lundi. How to Disrupt Cannes?
See full article at The Wrap »

Cannes Film Review: ‘How to Talk to Girls at Parties’

Cannes Film Review: ‘How to Talk to Girls at Parties’
There are a few crucial things to know about “How to Talk to Girls at Parties.” It’s the first feature John Cameron Mitchell has directed in seven years, as well as his fourth overall — after “Hedwig and the Angry Inch” (2001), “Shortbus” (2006), and the uncharacteristically gloomy “Rabbit Hole” (2010). It’s based on a 2006 short story by the author and graphic novelist Neil Gaiman. It’s a punked-out sci-fi period-piece romance set in the London suburb of Croydon during the run-up to Queen Elizabeth II’s 1977 Silver Jubilee celebration (the one the Sex Pistols crashed by sailing up the Thames playing “God Save the Queen”). It tells the story of Enn (Alex Sharp), a pogo-ing punk who’s really a sweet kid next door, and how he falls for Zan (Elle Fanning), who belongs to a mysterious alien cult. The other thing to say about “How to Talk to Girls at Parties
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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