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Another Romance of Celluloid (1938)

 -  Documentary | Short  -  1938 (USA)
6.0
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Ratings: 6.0/10 from 30 users  
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This second entry in MGM's "Romance of Film" series documents how celluloid movie film is processed and features behind-the-scenes glimpses of current MGM productions.

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Title: Another Romance of Celluloid (1938)

Another Romance of Celluloid (1938) on IMDb 6/10

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Cast

Uncredited cast:
Freddie Bartholomew ...
Himself (uncredited)
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Himself (uncredited)
Betty Ross Clarke ...
Herself (uncredited)
William H. Daniels ...
Himself (uncredited)
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Himself (uncredited)
Fay Holden ...
Herself (uncredited)
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Herself (uncredited)
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Himself (uncredited)
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Himself (uncredited)
John M. Nickolaus ...
Himself (uncredited)
Cecilia Parker ...
Herself (uncredited)
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Herself (uncredited)
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Himself (uncredited)
George B. Seitz ...
Himself (uncredited)
...
Herself (uncredited)
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Storyline

A tour of the MGM lab shows how technicians process movie film and behind-the-scenes glimpses of currently shooting MGM productions: "Marie Antoinette," "Judge Hardy's Children," "Test Pilot," and "Toy Wife" are shown. Film from the Oscar ceremony showing MGM contractees Luise Ranier and Spencer Tracy receiving Oscars is also featured. Of great interest to film buffs are references to films that would not be made for over a decade, albeit with a different cast, including Freddy Bartholomew in "Kim" and Fernand Gravey in "Scaramouche." Written by Gabe Taverney (duke1029@aol.com)

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Documentary | Short

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Details

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Release Date:

1938 (USA)  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

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Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Although Freddie Bartholomew is shown training with elephants in preparation for "Kim," the Rudyard Kipling novel would not reach the screen until 1950 with Dean Stockwell starring. Fernand Gravey is announced for "Scaramouche", but the Rafael Sabatini swashbuckler would not be made until 1952 with Stewart Granger. While Robert Taylor is announced as Spencer Tracy's co-star in "Northwest Passage," it would be Robert Young who appeared in the 1940 release. See more »

Connections

Features Test Pilot (1938) See more »

Soundtracks

Fight, Leo, Fight!
Performed by studio orchestra
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User Reviews

 
What happens after film is delivered to the lab...
30 June 2009 | by (U.S.A.) – See all my reviews

This MGM promotional short starts out where the last "Celluloid" short stopped. Now the film is ready to be developed in the lab after a day's shooting of MARIE ANTOINETTE with Norma Shearer, Tyrone Power and Robert Morely. We see the celluloid strips (many, many of them) drying in the lab where they're polished, dried and given a timing treatment so that all the images will appear consistent in photographic images.

Then we spot a tram taking a tour of sound stages, covering six miles of studio streets.

And finally, a glimpse of current stars on films either being made or being readied. Some of these were never made.

Interesting that plans were for Spencer Tracy and Robert Taylor to do NORTHWEST PASSAGE. Never happened. Fernand Gravet was to do SCARAMOUCHE. He never did. A film called UNVANQUISHED was never made. And so it goes. We get glimpses of MGM's stable of "more stars than there are in heaven"--samples of CLARK GABLE, SPENCER TRACY, MYRNA LOY, LEWIS STONE, MICKEY ROONEY, LUISE RAINER and MILIKA KORJUS ("The Great Waltz").

Interesting for film buffs.


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