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Gomorrah (2008) More at IMDbPro »Gomorra (original title)


2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

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Giveaway – Win Gomorrah Season 2 on Blu-ray

20 July 2016 12:30 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

To celebrate the release of Gomorrah – Season 2 on both DVD & Blu-ray on the 25th July 2016 we have acopy to give away on Blu-ray thanks to Arrow Films.  Gomorrah is based on the international bestselling book by Roberto Saviano who exposed the Camorra, a coalition of crime families in and around the urban backstreets of Naples, and has been living under police protection for eight years. The Italian premiere of Series Two recently broke the record ratings of House of Cards and Game of Thrones. Additionally, the series has been sold in over 130 countries including America’s Sundance TV. 

Don Pietro Savastano (Fortunato Cerlino) and Genny Savastano (Salvatore Esposito) seem to have lost everything and find themselves opposed by their once loyal soldier Ciro Di Marzio (Marco D’Amore) who worked hard on ending their undisputedly reign over north Naples. 

Ciro is not the only one who wants to see the »

- Villordsutch

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Watch: ‘Eternity and History’ Trailer: First U.S. Retrospective of Theo Angelopoulos’ Films In 25 Years

6 July 2016 1:33 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Filmmaker Theo Angelopoulos was one of the most widely acclaimed international art film directors of the 20th century, specializing in poetic, political films about contemporary Greece. Now, the Museum of Moving Image in New York will run a complete retrospective of Angelopoulos’ career, the first of its kind in the United States in 25 years. See the trailer for the series below.

Read More: NYC: Sidney Poitier Retrospective at Museum of the Moving Image Kicks Off This Weekend (April 9-17)

Chief Curator David Schwartz says that “as a new generation of Greek filmmakers, including Yorgos Lanthimos and Athina Rachel Tsangari, have reached international prominence, the time is ripe to see Angelopoulos anew, as cinema that reflects on the past while foretelling the turbulent world we are now living in.”

Some of the film in the series include his 1986 breakthrough work “Landscape in the Mist,” about two siblings traveling on their own »

- Vikram Murthi

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Suburra Review

22 June 2016 6:00 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Couched in the sort of kinetic and pounding direction that has hallmarked director Stefano Sollima’s work on Gomorra – the now two series-strong television take on Roberto Saviano’s book of the same name (and itself adapted into a film in 2008) – the gruesome Suburra is a down n’ dirty, and thoroughly testy affair. In […]

The post Suburra Review appeared first on HeyUGuys. »

- Greg Wetherall

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Second Season of Mob Series ‘Gomorrah’ Scores Gangbuster Ratings on Sky in Italy (Exclusive)

22 June 2016 3:33 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Rome — The second series of “Gomorrah,” Italy’s naturalistic Neapolitan mob show, which is the country’s biggest all-time TV export, has ended its Italian run scoring gangbuster ratings on Sky Italia.

The show, set to make its U.S. debut on SundanceTV on Aug. 24 with season one, has become the Murdoch-owned pay-tv platform’s highest-rated scripted series, and its top non-sports content in Italy.

Italian ratings for “Gomorrah” have been far higher than the latest seasons of “House of Cards” or “Game of Thrones,” and of any Hollywood blockbuster.

The 12-episode “Gomorrah 2,” which started airing in Italy in May, scored an average of close to 2 million viewers per episode — out of Sky’s 4.7 million Italian subscriber base — during its first local linear TV run, which ended last week.

Sky Italy content chief Andrea Scrosati is boasting 93% Italian viewer loyalty, or the portion of its audience who chose to watch subsequent episodes after tuning in once.

He »

- Nick Vivarelli

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Interview: Matteo Garrone, Tale of Tales

20 June 2016 11:50 AM, PDT | CineVue | See recent CineVue news »

Matteo Garrone first came to prominence internationally upon the release of his striking mafia epic Gomorrah - it might be hard to imagine just a few short years later he's off into the woods for a lavish cavort in a land of fairy tales. That is the case in Tale of Tales, though, a deliciously macabre fantasy and the director's first film in the English language and starring famous names like Salma Hayek, Vincent Cassel and Toby Jones. Matteo sat down with CineVue's Ben Nicholson to discuss the origins of the project and his inspirations in bringing the world to life.

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- CineVue UK

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Tale of Tales review – Matteo Garrone's delightful descent into darkness

17 June 2016 2:40 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Salma Hayek, Vincent Cassel and Toby Jones star in the Gomorrah director’s wonderful carnival of black-comic bad taste based on 16th-century folk stories

Film fantasy usually comes in two separate servings: either from what The Lego Movie called “Middle Zealand”, a Tolkien/GoT world of exotic and deadly serious myth for adults, or from the Disney-Pixar castle: hyperactive, super-smart animation for children. Through the simple fact of having a sense of humour, Matteo Garrone’s wonderful Tale of Tales is closer to the second model, but where a Pixar film is fiercely focused on its younger audience with continuous flicks of discreet sophistication for older consumers, Tale of Tales is for adults, with a perpetual undercurrent of childlike reverence for the bizarre events unfolding on screen. It’s fabulous in every sense.

Related: Tale of Tales: ‘Don’t try to understand it - just feel it’

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- Peter Bradshaw

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Film Review: Tale of Tales

16 June 2016 1:11 AM, PDT | CineVue | See recent CineVue news »

★★★★☆ Once upon a time, fairytales were folk tales. Then they became children's stories, were made into Disney cartoons and now star Angelina Jolie or Charlize Theron. Into the woods strides Matteo Garrone's Tale of Tales, an anthology of 17th century folk tales by Giambattista Basile told with a verve and commitment to the strange. Best known for his neo-neo-realism with such films as the Naples based gangland drama Gomorrah (which showed in the Un Certain Regard sidebar in 2008) and Reality, which showed in competition in 2012, Tale of Tales is Garrone's first feature in English, but in a way the film is in an older language.

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- CineVue UK

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Gomorrah: is the Italian mafia show having its plot-shock cake and eating it?

15 June 2016 7:19 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

It’s still a violent, voyeuristic rollercoaster, but has the second outing of the gangster drama suffered sophomore syndrome?

There was a moment in season two of Italian mafia drama Gomorrah when it seemed the show was lost: when Genny Savastano threatened his mortal enemy (and the man who killed his mum) Ciro di Marzio with a 3D-printed gun he’d smuggled past both customs and the other mafioso guarding Ciro, but then didn’t kill him. The show – based on Roberto Saviano’s 2006 expose of the Camorra, which earned the writer lifelong police protection – was having its plot-shock-crazed cake and eating it.

It seemed as if having sprung 100 plot curveballs in the first run, the film-makers had to turn to people not dying as the biggest source of surprises.

Continue reading »

- Dan Kuper

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Shirley Henderson: ‘There’s a need to understand how to write for women at any age’

12 June 2016 2:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The actor on her new film, a fairytale for adults, her creepy character in Happy Valley and feeling lost in drama school

Shirley Henderson, 50, has starred in numerous television, film and theatre productions, including Wonderland, Topsy-Turvy, Happy Valley, Southcliffe and Hamish Macbeth. She plays Jude in the Bridget Jones films, and Moaning Myrtle in the Harry Potter franchise. She studied drama at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama and lives in Fife with her partner. Her new film, Tale of Tales, is directed by the Italian Matteo Garrone (Gomorrah, Reality) and also stars Salma Hayek, Vincent Cassel and Toby Jones. It’s based on a trio of Neapolitan poet Giambattista Basile’s ancient fantasy morality tales, which predate the Brothers Grimm and Hans Christian Andersen. Henderson plays Imma, an old woman who yearns to be like her sister, Dora, who has been transformed by magic into a beautiful young maiden, who has beguiled the king.

Tale of Tales is Matteo Garrone’s first English-speaking film. How did you find working with him?

Fascinating. Obviously there’s a language barrier, but he knows enough. He doesn’t tell you too much until you begin, then he’s very clear about what he wants. It was an Italian set, and you think everybody’s shouting at you, but they’re not – it’s just a hyped-up atmosphere. He’s very exciting to work with and I’d jump at the chance again.

Continue reading »

- Interview by Barbara Ellen

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Tale of Tales: ‘Don’t try to understand it - just feel it’

11 June 2016 1:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Italian director Matteo Garrone made his name with realist mob movie Gomorrah, but for his new film he turned to 17th century fairytales

An ogre snaps the necks of his victims and casts them aside like empty clam shells. A queen chomps messily on the scarlet heart of a sea monster. A sexually insatiable king finds an elderly woman in his bed and has her thrown out of the window and into the treetops without a second thought. As these vignettes suggest, the Italian phantasmagoria Tale of Tales is as different from a Hollywood fairy story like Snow White and the Huntsman as a snuff movie is from a perfume commercial. Fairytales in cinema have been earthy and sexual before, but they have never been rendered with quite the level of realism found in this sumptuous, grotesque adaptation of the 17th-century yarns of Neapolitan poet Giambattista Basile.

Admired by the Brothers Grimm and Hans Christian Andersen, but nastier than they ever dared to be, Basile is the godfather of the modern fairytale. Talking of godfathers, it is Matteo Garrone, director of the mould-breaking 2008 mafia thriller Gomorrah, who is responsible for bringing Basile’s world to the screen. It seems unlikely that the maker of a mob movie, which made audiences look at a familiar topic with fresh eyes thanks to its unflinching grittiness, should end up in this land of monsters, giants and enchanted forests.

Continue reading »

- Ryan Gilbey

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Tale Of Tales review

10 June 2016 7:09 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

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From the director of Gomorra comes the deliciously odd adult fairy tale, Tale Of Tales. Ryan reviews a cult gem in the making...

Like The Princess Bride directed by Ken Russell, Matteo Garrone’s Tale Of Tales is a full-blooded and decidedly adult fairy tale. Set in a quasi-medieval Europe of castles, four-poster beds, bulbous gowns, the movie relates a grimly comic set of interlocking fables.

It begins with a king and queen (respectively, John C Reilly and Salma Hayek) who turn to witchcraft in order to conceive a child, before lurching to the story of monarch (Vincent Cassell) who’s so sex-obsessed that he embarks on a romance with a peasant girl based purely on her angelic singing voice. You can probably guess the king’s reaction when he discovers that the peasant girl is actually far older and more leprous than he assumes. 

Weirdest of the lot is the story of yet another king (this one played by Toby Jones) who rears a giant flea and then, for reasons far too complicated and wonderful to relate here, unwillingly marries off his lily white young daughter Violet (Bebe Cave) to a hideous ogre. You might think from these brief descriptions that there isn’t very much linking these surreal, dark and sometimes violent stories, but the realisation gradually dawns that each carries echoes of the last. A pair of siblings are reunited in one story, while a pair of sisters are divided in the next; one character becomes a royal over here, while a luckless heir is cast into a filth and misery over there. To loosely quote George Lucas, “It’s like poetry. It rhymes”.

A deeper meaning behind Garrone’s mad fantasy is harder to pin down. At first, it’s enough to simply admire his often stunningly conceived images: a character dining on crimson offal in an ice-white room. Toby Jones befriending his pet flea. Tale Of Tales brings us universal stories of birth, death, marriage and desire, but viewed through a uniquely strange filter. Dramatic irony is everywhere,and there’s a recurring theme about divisions: between old and young, rich and poor, life and death.

Relying less on obvious splashes of CGI than most mainstream fantasies, Tale Of Tales’ use of real European locations and physical effects set it apart from the likes of, say, Duncan Jones' Warcraft or Peter Jackson’s Hobbit movies. There’s an earthiness to the creature designs and costumes that brings Tale Of Tales closer to the look and feel of Jean-Jacques Annaud’s underrated adaptation of Umberto Eco’s The Name Of The Rose, or maybe Paul Verhoeven’s American debut, Flesh + Blood. There’s also a hint of the matter-of-factness that made Garrone’s 2008 Mafia drama Gomorrah such compulsive viewing.

Where so many films leave us numbed by their swooping computerised vistas, Tale Of Tales keeps things at gut-level. There’s a wonderfully ominous funeral sequence which, thanks to some stunning competition and sound design, provides a captivating moment to pore over before Garrone suddenly shifts the action to a jarringly sordid moment elsewhere.

Cut to Alexandre Desplat’s lush score, Garrone’s film moves with between tones with ease. Some scenes have all the humour of a joke well told. Other moments in Tale Of Tales are gory on a level approaching Game Of Thrones. One sequence is genuinely terrifying. Inevitably, the film’s sheer weirdness won’t endear everybody - one or two people were checking their phones in the screening I attended. Those with a taste for the imaginative and the surreal will surely be bewitched by Garrone’s fairytale anthology, however, and there’s the strong possibility that Tale Of Tales will acquire cult status in years to come.

My advice? Cut to the chase and watch it in a cinema while you can.

Tale Of Tales is out in UK cinemas on the 17th June.

Movies Tale Of Tales Salma Hayek John C Reilly Vincent Cassell Toby Jones Tale Of Tales Matteo Garrone movie review Review Ryan Lambie 15 Jun 2016 - 06:17 »

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UK poster and trailer for Tale of Tales starring Salma Hayek

3 June 2016 3:30 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

With just three weeks to go before its UK release, a new trailer has arrived online along with a quad poster for Matteo Garrone’s upcoming fantasy horror Tale of Tales which stars Salma Hayek, John C. Reilly, Toby Jones and Vincent Cassel; take a look below…

Sea monsters, monarchs, ogres, and sorcerers: Salma Hayek and John C. Reilly star in this breathtaking Baroque fantasy from the visionary director of Gomorrah. Based on three spellbinding stories of magic and the macabre by 17th-century folklorist Giambattista Basile, Tale of Tales unleashes a barrage of mind-bogglingly gorgeous and fantastical imagery as it brings to life the (mis)adventures of three kings: in the kingdom of Darkwood, the King (Reilly) and his Queen (Hayek) attempt to conceive a child through very unusual means; meanwhile, in Highhills, the none-too-bright monarch (Toby Jones) marries off his daughter to brutal ogre while developing a strange obsession »

- Amie Cranswick

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‘Tale of Tales’ Review

2 June 2016 6:17 AM, PDT | Blogomatic3000 | See recent Blogomatic3000 news »

Stars: Salma Hayek, Christian Lees, Jonah Lees, Vincent Cassel, Hayley Carmichael, Shirley Henderson, Toby Jones, Bebe Cave, Guillaume Delaunay, John C. Reilly | Written by Edoardo Albinati, Ugo Chiti, Matteo Garrone, Massimo Gaudioso | Directed by Matteo Garrone

Tale of Tales is a peculiar film and it’s difficult to know where to start with it. It has been directed by Matteo Garrone, who is best known for the Italian gangster film Gomorrah, a film so naturalistic in its approach, it almost felt like a documentary. Which makes Tale of Tales, a retelling of three archetypal fairystories with a surreal dream-like approach, a surprise straight out of leftfield.

The three interwoven stories take place in separate kingdoms. In the first, Salma Hayek’s queen uses dark magic to finally give her a son (Christian Lees), but becomes violently jealous when her progeny prefers the company of his mysterious doppelganger (Jonah Lees) to her. »

- Jack Kirby

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Gomorrah season 2 coming to DVD and Blu-ray in July from Arrow Films

25 May 2016 10:30 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

For those of you that have been watching the excellent Italian mafia crime drama Gomorrah on Sky Atlantic you will be more than happy to read that in July, Arrow Films will be releasing the complete second season on both DVD & Blu-ray.

Gomorrah is based on the international bestselling book by Roberto Saviano who exposed the Camorra, a coalition of crime families in and around the urban backstreets of Naples, and has been living under police protection for eight years. The Italian premiere of Series Two recently broke the record ratings of House of Cards and Game of Thrones. Additionally, the series has been sold in over 130 countries including America’s Sundance TV. 

Don Pietro Savastano (Fortunato Cerlino) and Genny Savastano (Salvatore Esposito) seem to have lost everything and find themselves opposed by their once loyal soldier Ciro Di Marzio (Marco D’Amore) who worked hard on ending their undisputedly reign over north Naples. »

- Villordsutch

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Sergio Leone's "Colt" Becomes A Mini-Series

25 May 2016 1:03 PM, PDT | Dark Horizons | See recent Dark Horizons news »

The Leone Film Group has begun developing an English-language TV series titled "Colt," based on an idea developed by the late and great iconic spaghetti western filmmaker Sergio Leone.

The concept centers around the six-shooter gun packed by Clint Eastwood in "For a Fistful of Dollars." In 1987 Sergio Leone hooked up with his old writing partners Sergio Donati and Fulvio Morsella to work on an idea for a TV series about a Colt revolver that passes from owner to owner throughout the Old West.

Leone was said to be interested in a more naturalistic take on the Spaghetti Western genre than his earlier works, hoping to show the Old West "like it really was." Donati wrote a treatment draft, but then the project was abandoned.

Italian director Stefano Sollima (Sky's "Gomorra") will direct the first two episodes and act as showrunner along with writing the screenplay alongside Luca Infascelli and Massimo Gaudioso. »

- Garth Franklin

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Sergio Leone’s Heirs to Produce Spaghetti Western TV Series Titled ‘Colt’ (Exclusive)

25 May 2016 6:50 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Rome — Italy’s expanding Leone Film Group is venturing into the Spaghetti Western territory so dear to its late great founder with an English-language TV series titled “Colt,” based on an idea developed by Sergio Leone, master of the genre.

The concept is centered around the six-shooter packed by Clint Eastwood in “For a Fistful of Dollars.”

“It’s from my father’s idea in which the gun was the main character and the device through which the tale is told,” said Raffaella Leone, who now runs Leone Film Group with her brother Andrea.

“We are thinking of six episodes, each one connected to a single gun shot. But we could do more,” she added.

Italian director Stefano Sollima, who has made a name for himself helming Sky’s naturalistic Neapolitan mob drama “Gomorra,” which is Italy’s all time top TV export, will direct the first two episodes and act as showrunner. »

- Nick Vivarelli

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Sergio Leone’s Heirs to Produce Spaghetti Western TV Series Titled ‘Colt’ (Exclusive)

25 May 2016 6:50 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Rome — Italy’s expanding Leone Film Group is venturing into the Spaghetti Western territory so dear to its late great founder with an English-language TV series titled “Colt,” based on an idea developed by Sergio Leone, master of the genre.

The concept is centered around the six-shooter packed by Clint Eastwood in “For a Fistful of Dollars.”

“It’s from my father’s idea in which the gun was the main character and the device through which the tale is told,” said Raffaella Leone, who now runs Leone Film Group with her brother Andrea.

“We are thinking of six episodes, each one connected to a single gun shot. But we could do more,” she added.

Italian director Stefano Sollima, who has made a name for himself helming Sky’s naturalistic Neapolitan mob drama “Gomorra,” which is Italy’s all time top TV export, will direct the first two episodes and act as showrunner. »

- Nick Vivarelli

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Cannes: Italy’s Fandango Takes Sales on Victor Gaviria’s ‘The Animal’s Wife’

19 May 2016 6:30 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Cannes — Italian producer Domenico Procacci’s Fandango Sales has taken world sales on pluriprized Colombian director Victor Gaviria’s female empowerment drama “The Animal’s Wife.”

Gaviria, who has been in the Cannes competition twice – with his first feature “Rodrigo D: No Future” in 1990 and “The Rose Seller” in 1998 – is known for his signature cinema verite style.

His upcoming film, which is currently in post, is billed as an expose of the ways in which thousands of Colombian women are forced into submitting to violence on a daily basis.

World sales representation of “Wife” by Rome-based Fandango Sales underscores the fact they have been increasing the number of international titles on its slate lately, after focussing primarily on its own productions since they shuttered their larger London-based Fandango Portobello joint venture in 2013.

Besides being active in film, Procacci (pictured) is currently also increasingly operating on the TV front. He is among producers, »

- Nick Vivarelli

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'Pericle' Exclusive Clip: A First Look at Mob Enforcer Crime Drama Ahead of Its Cannes Premiere

12 May 2016 2:30 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

In the new crime drama "Pericle," a mafia hit man (Riccardo Scamarcio) living in Belgium accidentally kills a woman related to an enemy clan of his Don. When he's sentenced to death, Pericle goes on the run to hide in the shadows and live a new life. He finds safe harbor in France where he meets a woman who wishes to help him. Soon they start a relationship that provides Pericle the first chance at a different life, one that exists outside the confines of mafia culture. But when he discovers that his own Don sold his head, Pericle must takes revenge on those who wish to steal his life away. Check out an exclusive clip from the film above ahead of its Cannes premiere in the Un Certain Regard section. Read More: Cannes First Look: The Dardennes' 'The Unknown Girl,' Andrea Arnold's 'American Honey' And »

- Vikram Murthi

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There will be blood – the unmissable, ultimate mafia show Gomorrah is back

11 May 2016 7:27 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

The first season made The Godfather look like Gilbert and Sullivan. After two years of hard slog for fans, the crime drama finally returns tonight. But can the producers keep up the nerve-shredding pace – and will we be able to hack it?

There are moments you remember for your whole life: your first day at school; your child’s first steps; the climax of the first series of Gomorrah. The 2014 Italian crime drama, whose second season belatedly returns this week, capped off its first run with an adrenaline-charged crescendo of plot shocks and gratuitous killing that made The Godfather look like Gilbert and Sullivan.

Gomorrah is a fictional adaptation of Roberto Saviano’s 2006 real-life tell-all book about the Camorra, the Neapolitan crime syndicate. That book – followed by Matteo Garrone’s 2008 film – famously tore down the mythology of the mafia that had endured from The Godfather through to The Sopranos; that of a kind-hearted, »

- Dan Kuper

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

1-20 of 38 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


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