6.1/10
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77 user 95 critic

In the Electric Mist (2009)

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A detective in post-Katrina New Orleans has a series of surreal encounters with a troop of friendly Confederate soldiers while investigating serial killings of local prostitutes, a 1965 lynching, and corrupt local businessmen.

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(screenplay), (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
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2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Rosie Gomez
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Ben Hebert
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Lou Girard
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Cholo Manelli
Bernard Hocke ...
Murphy Doucet
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Michael Goldman
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Sheriff
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Storyline

Lt. Dave Robicheaux, a detective in New Iberia, Louisiana, is trying to link the murder of a local hooker to New Orleans mobster Julie (Baby Feet) Balboni, who is co-producer of a Civil War film. At the same time, after Elrod Sykes, the star of the film, reports finding another corpse in the Atchafalaya Swamp near the movie set, Robicheaux starts another investigation, believing the corpse to be the remains of a black man who he saw being murdered 35 years before. Written by anonymous

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

No one can escape the sins of the past.


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for violence, language and brief sexuality/nudity | See all certifications »

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Details

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Release Date:

15 April 2009 (France)  »

Also Known As:

In the Electric Mist with Confederate Dead  »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

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Sound Mix:

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Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

John Goodman jokes to Tommy Lee Jones, "I'm making a baseball movie next. Want a part in it?" Jones played Ty Cobb in 1994. See more »

Goofs

FBI agent Gomez uses a snub nose .38 caliber revolver on duty. FBI agents have a limited list of approved pistols. That list does not include any revolvers or .38 caliber weapons. See more »

Quotes

Dave Robicheaux: You don't want to go back out there. In fact, you don't want to go anywhere near this bus station again. From now on, you better treat this place like it is downtown Baghdad, because I will blow your god damned head off if you don't find a god damned line of honest god damned work.
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Connections

Follows Heaven's Prisoners (1996) See more »

Soundtracks

Mantras
Written by Eyez aka Jon Cedric Thomas
Performed by Eyez
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Good film
13 March 2009 | by See all my reviews

I can count on my fingers with half my hand cut away the number of times I've ever been disappointed by Tommy Lee Jones's performance in a film. This film here is no exception. John Goodman is another who always delivers a solid performance and they both give us a great show. The writing of the script is solid and the setting of the film is provoking. The entire film works well with support from veteran character actors like Ned Beatty, craggy faced James Gammon and ex-drummer Levon Helm, as well as younger performers like Mary Steenburgen, Justina Machado,Kelly Macdonald and the up and coming Peter Sargaard.

One might argue that this kind of a role is almost type casting for Tommy Lee Jones but I would argue otherwise. An actor works with what he has and TLJ has always been able to use his face to great advantage from a stone-cold glare to a sheepish grin. The story is told from his character's point of view, in this case, a person with an uncompromising sense of justice-- not a paragon of virtue, by any means, but one who refuses to sacrifice his principles of right and wrong, i.e., the hero with a decidedly human face. The tension does not let up as the hunt draws closer and closer to the conclusion. While I think the little coda at the end was unneeded, it still works to make a good story.


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